Online, you are guilty even after being proven innocent

Once you’re arrested, your name is tarnished forever.

More and more people are having “Google problems.” They usually look like this:

  1. someone got arrested;
  2. the local newspaper wrote about it;
  3. prosecutors dropped the charges completely;
  4. the person’s record was expunged (in other words, the slate was wiped clean);
  5. the original arrest article, however, is still online.

Now whenever anyone searches that person’s name, the arrest is one of the top Google results even though they’re weren’t guilty.

Google: Your new permanent record

You can imagine the trouble this causes for the individual seeking the article’s takedown: difficulty getting a job, a promotion, or even a date. It seems unfair that even though the judicial system saw fit to remove all traces of the arrest from the person’s record, there’s no corresponding requirement that the local newspaper do the same. What’s the point of expunging a record when anyone with internet access can bring up an old, bogus arrest? Even if a court of law drops the matter, the court of public opinion has condemned that person for life.

The free speech rights of publishers trump those of individuals

In the battle of the newspapers versus the individual’s reputation, the law is on the newspapers’ side. They have a First Amendment right to report true information and are under no legal obligation to remove—“unpublish,” as it’s referred to lately—content, even when significant updates have occurred. In our experience, publishers are generally unwilling to remove articles that were factually accurate when written. Their reasoning ranges from lofty (saying they don’t want to “rewrite the historical record”) to lazy (they have a policy of never changing anything).

Some publications will remove an article, but only if the stars align and several factors exist: the publication doesn’t have a strict policy against unpublishing, we reach an actual human being, we reach an actual human being who’s in a good mood that day, we’re able to provide documentation of the dropped charges or expunged record, and the person to whom we speak decides that the facts of the particular situation warrant removal. It takes hard work, persistence, and luck. Does it happen? Yes, but you can see why it’s pretty rare

2 thoughts on “Online, you are guilty even after being proven innocent”

  1. Alan, I have something you need to see, give me about 20 minutes to post it, ALL OF WORDPRESS NEEDS TO SEE THIS, it’s JUST a video with LITTLE children, DISNEY, ANDY GRIFFITH, and SOME OF THE ANIMATED “CHILDRENS” shows that has already came out, and some that are SOON TO BE RELEASED….

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