Children must be watched and protected

Child dies from poisoning
It is a Parent’s responsibility to teach and protect their Children

N.Y. Toddler Dies From Liquid Nicotine Poisoning

Dec. 15, 2014 — A 1-year-old child in New York State is believed to be the first youngster in the United States to die of poisoning from liquid nicotine, the substance used in electronic cigarettes.

Police said the toddler was found unresponsive last Tuesday after ingesting liquid nicotine at a home in Fort Plain, N.Y., and later died in hospital, ABC News reported.

The death is believed to be a “tragic accident,” according to a statement released by Fort Plain police. They did not say whether the liquid nicotine was associated with an e-cigarette.

With the growing popularity of e-cigarettes, health officials are concerned there could be more fatal incidents like this one if steps aren’t taken to protect children, ABC News reported.

Brightly-colored liquid nicotine comes in flavors such as gummy bear or cotton candy, which is appealing to youngsters, health officials warn.

“One teaspoon of liquid nicotine could be lethal to a child, and smaller amounts can cause severe illness, often requiring trips to the emergency department,” the American Association of Poison Control centers in a statement, ABC News reported. “Despite the dangers these products pose to children, there are currently no standards set in place that require child-proof packaging.”

In recent years, there’s been a sharp rise in the number of liquid nicotine-related calls to U.S. poison control centers.

Just a small amount of nicotine can cause seizures and other dangerous symptoms in children, Dr. Donna Seger, director of the poison control center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told ABC News.

AM I MISSING SOMETHING HERE????

Ohio delays execution of child killer

Man that killed 3-year-old
Ronald Phillips

COLUMBUS – Ohio said Thursday that it’s dropping the two-drug combination administered to an inmate who repeatedly gasped and snorted during a troubling 26-minute execution.

The state prisons agency also said it will again allow the use of an anesthetic that it used from 1999 through 2011.

The announcement that it’s adding thiopental sodium back to the execution policy immediately raised questions of where the state would obtain such a drug.

In 2011, the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction switched to pentobarbital when the manufacturer restricted thiopental sodium’s distribution, making it impossible to obtain for executions.
As part of Thursday’s announcement, the state said the Feb. 11 execution of a condemned child killer is being delayed as the agency secures supplies of the new drug.

The state said in addition to delaying the execution of Ronald Phillips, set to die for the 1993 rape and killing of his girlfriend’s 3-year-old daughter, other executions might also be delayed.

Kasich signed a bill into law last month that would shield the names of companies providing lethal drugs to Ohio. The goal of the bill is to make it easier to obtain compounded pentobarbital, the state’s first choice for executions but which it hasn’t been able to find.

Four death row inmates have sued over the new law, saying it restricts information that helps inform the public debate over capital punishment.