NC Woman Charged With Felony Child Abuse

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Brandy Bell Thomas, 36

YADKIN COUNTY, N.C. —A Yadkin County woman was charged with felony child abuse after red marks were found on her child, deputies said.

Brandy Bell Thomas, 36, of Yadkinville, was arrested following an investigation that began May 25.

Yadkin County deputies said the child’s father called law enforcement after noticing red marks on the child’s lower back.

The father had picked up the child from Thomas, the child’s mother, prior to noticing the marks, deputies said.

Following an investigation, deputies charged Thomas with one felony count of child abuse with serious physical injury. Thomas was held in the Yadkin County jail under a $10,000 secured bond pending a Wednesday court appearance.

No other information was released.

CRONYISM VS WE THE PEOPLE

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Corrupt LawMakers sell-out Our Elders

Corrupt LawMakers show their true colors again. They not only don’t care that Children are SEX OBJECTS FOR ADULTS, they have now shown that THEY CARE NOTHING FOR OUR ELDERS AND ELDER ABUSE.

Through obvious UNDER-THE-TABLE deals, CORRUPT CRONY LAWMAKERS SOLD OUR ELDERS FOR 30 PIECES OF SILVER to bottom feeders like Teddy Lichtschein and Eliezer Scheiner, operators of some of the most poorly rated nursing homes in Texas. Their small empire has amassed more than $800,000 in federal fines over the past three years.

From their headquarters in Brooklyn, N.Y., Teddy Lichtschein and Eliezer Scheiner operate some of the most poorly rated nursing homes in Texas. Their small empire has amassed more than $800,000 in federal fines over the past three years.

Regulators reported numerous problems.  One patient who fractured his leg waited four days to have his broken bone treated.  Another resident, given food he could not chew, choked to death in his wheelchair.  An 80-year-old woman with rectal cancer screamed in agony for two weeks before attendants phoned her doctor.

Despite this record, Lichtschein and Scheiner have new partners in the nursing home trade: seven public agencies, which could position the Brooklyn duo for a taxpayer-funded windfall.

A special state program to attract additional federal Medicaid money will bring an extra $69 million to Texas nursing homes this year, with more to come next year.  It was supposed to be for government-owned homes.

Much of it, however, will go to a multitude of private operators — such as Lichtschein and Scheiner who were savvy enough to craft unusual licensing arrangements with governmental bodies.

In a development wholly unforeseen by state officials, the licenses of more than 300 privately owned nursing homes have changed hands within the past year. They are now held by public hospital districts and hospital authorities.

Some of these homes are hundreds of miles from the districts themselves. Many of them have been repeatedly cited for serious deficiencies.