Two NC Daycare Workers Charged with Child Abuse

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Mary Neal Winchester, 55

Another Daycare Worker Charged With
Child Abuse in Rockingham Co.

WENTWORTH, NC  –  A second daycare worker is facing child abuse charges in Rockingham County.

The Rockingham County Sheriff’s Office confirms Mary Neal Winchester, 55, has been arrested and charged with two counts of misdemeanor Child Abuse.

The charges stem from an ongoing investigation into abuse at Lil’ Daydreamers Child Development Center in Reidsville.

The warrant for her arrest accuses her of “grabbing the child by one of the child’s arms and slinging her up against a cabinet and then picking her up and dropping her violently on the floor.”

Winchester was placed in the Rockingham County Detention Facility under a $10,000 secured bond.

Earlier this month (Feb. 15) detectives charged Nekeisha Latwanna Walton, 39, with two counts of misdemeanor Child Abuse.

The warrant for Walton’s arrest accuse her of “forcefully grabbing the child by the arm, jerking her, and then pushing her over.”

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services has also been involved in this investigation.  A spokesperson says it is aware of the allegations and is considering next steps.

Winchester and Walton were both employees of the Lil’ Daydreamers Child Development Center at the time the alleged abuse occurred.  Attempts to reach the daycare’s owner for unsuccessful.

WFMY News 2 reached out to the Pastor of Noah’s Ark Full Gospel Baptist Church, where the daycare is located, but our call wasn’t returned.

No Demonstrations No Angry Voices To End Child Abuse

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Lisa Eck, the Child’s mother, spoke out about the crime saying she never saw it coming.

When to get help:  A Specialist’s advice on
spotting signs of Child Abuse

TOLEDO, OH  –  Twenty five-year-old Zach Shadix , the man accused of killing 8-month-old Gabrielle Walker, appeared in court Thursday.  Walker’s mother Lisa Eck spoke out about the crime saying she never saw it coming.

“I had woke up and went and made the baby a bottle like I do every morning.  I went to her bassinet to get her and she was black and blue all over the right side of her face,” said Eck.

Eck told NBC 24 Shadix lived with her, the infant, and her 9 year-old son for 6 months without any problems.  Child behavior experts at the Family and Childhood Abuse Prevention Center in Toledo say the one’s closest to you often commit crimes.

“A child is more likely to be hurt and killed by someone they trust,” said Dr. Christie Jenkins CEO of the center.

She deals with victims and their families, warning them of red flags.

“They’re scared, they cry they can be very clingy to the caregiver that’s not abusing them,” said Jenkins of the behavior of abused children.

While children might show a change in behavior there’s also the physical signs with odd-shaped bruises.

“When it’s abuse there’s typically circular motions there’s indentations of actual pieces of objects,” said Jenkins.

Even if an abuser isn’t harming a child psychically, there are often signs in the way they treat adults including getting easily frustrated along with being emotionally and physically abusive.

In addition to short tempers abusers will often have a rocky past.  Court documents show Shadix had prior charges in Lucas County for violent behavior.

“If they’re going to do that with you when you’re gone and that baby is completely helpless, they’re going to do that with that child,” said Jenkins.

Right now Shadix is in custody, while Eck says she’s still processing what happened to her child.

If the above signs sound familiar or you have questions about child abuse the center offers free counseling and one-on-one sessions.  You can visit their website to find more information.

Memphis CAC Teaches About Child Abuse

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Kris Crim with the Memphis Child Advocacy Center.

Child Abuse prevention: One in five children
sexually assaulted in Shelby County

SHELBY COUNTY, TN  –  There have been three child rape cases reported within days in Shelby County, and thousands within the past few months.

“90 percent of the time the abuser is someone that the child knows.  60 percent, it’s someone within the family’s circle,” said Kris Crim with the Memphis Child Advocacy Center.

Crim said many kids will keep the abuse a secret, because they feel confused or scared.

It’s why he’s been teaching adults about abuse through Stewards of Children program.

The course talks about what to look for.

“Often physical signs are not present.  Sometimes they are.  Often times they are not.  We have to be in tune with emotional behavior.  Things that may be happening like too perfect behavior or children acting out in certain ways,” he said.

Also, the program addresses conversations to have with children.

“Teaching children that no can be an appropriate response to adults if there’s an uncomfortable touch or something that makes them feel uncomfortable,” said Crim.

He said studies show one in five children in Shelby County are sexually abused by their 18th birthday.  That’s double the national average.

“We know that over 80 percent of sexual abuse occurs in isolated one-on-one situations,” he said.

Child advocates said predators may not have a prior record or be listed on a sex offender registry.

They can come off as warm and loving to the outside world.  It’s why they get away with the horrific acts.

It’s important to listen to your gut and talk to your child if something just doesn’t feel right.

If you suspect abuse, call the Tennessee Child Abuse hotline at 1-877-237-0004.  You can remain anonymous, and you don’t have to know all the facts.

If you don’t report abuse, you can face criminal charges in Mississippi and Tennessee.

For more information about the Stewards for Children program, check out the Child Advocacy Center’s open enrollment sessions:

  • March 7, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation office, 1900 Union Ave.
  • March 17, 9-11:30 a.m., Memphis Child Advocacy Center, 1085 Poplar Ave,
  • April 4, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation
  • April 21, 9-11:30 a.m., Memphis Child Advocacy Center
  • April 30, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation

Pre-registration is required.  Contact Keita Cooley at 888-4362 or kcooley@memphiscac.org.

Our Protectors Come In One Size – Heroes

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Thank You All!!!!

The impacts of Child Abuse, through the
eyes of an officer

SPOKANE, WA  –  As the first ones to arrive on the scene of a crime, law enforcement officers see the impacts of child abuse firsthand.

“It’s something that you don’t get over quickly – it may never leave you,” said Spokane Police Officer John O’Brien.  “It doesn’t get easier to deal with.  It’s really hard to understand what’s going on in the minds of a parent or guardian that would do that to a child,” he said.

He says child abuse can affect anyone, in any situation.  It’s not limited to a certain neighborhood or demographic.  That’s part of what makes it difficult to address.

“A crime against an adult is horrible as it is, but when you have an innocent, defenseless child who doesn’t know they’re going to be victimized it’s devastating.  There’s no way for that child to fight back or protect themselves,” O’Brien said.

Especially when a child’s life ends because of abuse.

“Officers, you know we have this uniform and we have a tough exterior at times but we are human and we have those same emotions it’s hard to see a child killed at the hands of another person,” O’Brien said.

When law enforcement responds to a child abuse call, they have a chance to break the cycle of abuse.  That’s something that sticks with them.

“You often wonder did that make a difference?  Did that turn the tide for them, that they’ve got clean, done any of the programs that have learned how to be a parent?  Because parenting is not easy at times,” O’Brien said.

That’s why — police say— the community’s help is so critical.

“We can do our part, but we also want the community to help us do that part to say something to partner with us so that we can stop or do our best to at least reduce or eliminate child abuse,” O’Brien said.

Anger Management Pt-3 of 3

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Violence is out-of-control, and Domestic Violence can not be justified.

When To Seek Help

When to seek help for anger management and control

If your anger is still spiraling out of control, despite putting the previous anger management techniques into practice, or if you’re getting into trouble with the law or hurting others  –  you need more help.  There are many therapists, classes, and programs for people with anger management problems.  Asking for help is not a sign of weakness.  You’ll often find others in the same shoes, and getting direct feedback on techniques for controlling anger can be tremendously helpful.

Consider professional help if:

  • You feel constantly frustrated and angry no matter what you try.
  • Your temper causes problems at work or in your relationships.
  • You avoid new events and people because you feel like you can’t control your temper.
  • You have gotten in trouble with the law due to your anger.  Your anger has ever led to physical violence.
  • Your anger has ever led to physical violence.

Therapy for anger problems.  Therapy can be a great way to explore the reasons behind your anger.  If you don’t know why you are getting angry, it’s very hard to control.  Therapy provides a safe environment to learn more about your reasons and identify triggers for your anger.  It’s also a safe place to practice new skills in expressing your anger.

Anger management classes or groups.  Anger management classes or groups allow you to see others coping with the same struggles.  You will also learn tips and techniques for managing your anger and hear other people’s stories.  For domestic violence issues, traditional anger management is usually not recommended.  There are special classes that go to the issue of power and control that are at the heart of domestic violence.

If your loved one has an anger management problem

If your loved one has an anger problem, you probably feel like you’re walking on eggshells all the time.  But always remember that you are not to blame for your loved one’s anger.  There is never an excuse for physically or verbally abusive behavior.  You have a right to be treated with respect and to live without fear of an angry outburst or a violent rage.

Tips for dealing with a loved one’s anger management problem

While you can’t control another person’s anger, you can control how you respond to it:

  • Set clear boundaries about what you will and will not tolerate.
  • Wait for a time when you are both calm to talk to your loved one about the anger problem.  Don’t bring it up when either one of you is already angry.
  • Remove yourself from the situation if your loved one does not calm down.
  • Consider counseling or therapy for yourself if you are having a hard time standing up for yourself.
  • Put your safety first.  Trust your instincts.  If you feel unsafe or threatened in any way, get away from your loved one and go somewhere safe.

Anger isn’t the real problem in abusive relationships

Despite what many people believe, domestic violence and abuse is not due to the abuser’s loss of control over his behavior and temper.  In fact, abusive behavior is a deliberate choice for the sole purpose of controlling you.   If you are in an abusive relationship, know that couples counseling is not recommended  –  and that your partner needs specialized treatment, not regular anger management classes.

Source:  helpguide.org