All posts by NIMWOwl

Attended Cathedral Catholic High School, Dallas Texas Senior Editor and Contributor for NOT IN MYWORLD!!!! http://notinmyworld.org https://plus.google.com/+NotinmyworldOrgGPlus https://www.facebook.com/NotinmyworldOrg https://twitter.com/NotinmyworldOrg

Gov. Scott Signs Bill to Let Children Secretly Tape Their Rapists

.jpg photo of Florida Governor
Florida Gov. Rick Scott

I don’t mind saying that the Laws this Country was founded upon, and put in place by Our ForeFathers to protect the innocent and hold the guilty accountable for their crimes, have been manipulated by a perverse group to the point where the guilty go free at the expense of the innocent.

To make this possible, Our Bill Of Rights was dissected, then each and every word analysed as to every possible meaning.  The end result casts a shadow of doubt on the motives of the innocent, and not only lets the guilty go free, but leaves the impression that they are the offended and injured party.

Florida  –  Child rape victims have legal permission to secretly record their rapists under legislation signed by Gov. Rick Scott one day after an ice cream truck driver who was serving a life sentence for sexually assaulting his stepdaughter was acquitted at a second trial.

The bill Scott signed Friday was a response to the Florida Supreme Court ordering a new trial for Richard McDade, who was convicted of repeatedly raping his stepdaughter when she was between 10 and 16. A judge during the first trial allowed recordings of conversations McDade had with his stepdaughter that she secretly recorded with an MP3 player hidden in her shirt.

But the Supreme Court ruled the recording was illegal and ordered a new trial last December. Florida prohibits conversations to be recorded or otherwise intercepted without the consent of both parties. The new law makes an exception for children who are victims or potential victims of rape and other violent acts that record their attackers. The law takes effect July 1.

McDade, 68, walked free Thursday after a Lee County jury that didn’t hear the recordings acquitted him. The Lee County state attorney’s office said the recordings wouldn’t have been allowed at the second trial even if the Legislature and Scott acted sooner because they were illegal at the time they were made.

Sexual abuse victim advocate Lauren Book said the bill signing was one good outcome of the case, though she was outraged at McDade’s acquittal.

“Nobody can or should feel good about this. The only silver lining is this won’t happen going forward,” said Book, who founded Lauren Kid’s, a nonprofit group that raises awareness about sexual abuse and seeks to prevent it. “It’s sort of sad that children need to be their own heroes sometimes, but that is what this bill does.”
Lee County Assistant state attorney Tyler Lovejoy, who prosecuted the McDade case, praised the new law.

“It is easy to stand behind legislation that protects children,” Lovejoy said. “Anytime that legislation opens the door for new, corroborative evidence to be admitted in the courtroom, it is both bold and inspiring. What is most exciting about today is the prospect that prosecutors have a new weapon to use against those who seek to harm children, and those same children can provide a new voice to those who still do not believe in monsters.”

NEVER Shake A Baby

When Your Baby Won’t Stop Crying

Shaken Baby Syndrome occurs when a baby is shaken. The blood vessels in a baby’s head cannot tolerate the impact of shaking and can break.

  • Each year about 1,000 children die from Shaken Baby Syndrome.
  • Death, brain damage, mental retardation, seizures, or blindness may result from shaking a baby.
  • Shaking usually happens when parents or caregivers become frustrated or angry when they are not able to stop the baby from crying.
  • Shaken baby syndrome is 100% preventable.

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics

Comforting a crying baby: Know when to seek help

If the stress or crying becomes more than you can stand, or if you feel like shaking, hitting or harming your baby in any way, call for help immediately.

In the U.S.:

  • 24-Hour Parent Helpline: 1-888-435-7553
  • Crying Baby Hotline: 1-866-243-2229
  • Fussy Baby Warmline: 1-888-431-BABY

In the UK:

  • Parentline: 0808 800 2222
  • Parent Lifeline: 0114 272 6575

In Australia:

  • Parentline: 1300 30 1300

In Canada:

  • Parent Help Line: 1-800-668-6868

If you constantly feel overwhelmed and the feeling doesn’t go away, you probably need some outside help. Additionally, if you are feeling like you can’t pick up on your baby’s cues or your baby isn’t alert enough to engage in the early milestone behaviors, it is important to seek help as soon as possible. Problems that are identified right away can almost always be solved.

Special circumstances that might require professional help

Physical, mental, or emotional challenges at birth, or soon after, are often traumatic to an infant and can cause your baby’s nervous system to get “stuck.” A nervous system that is stuck will probably have difficulty with regulation, which means the baby will have a hard time settling down.

Special or traumatic circumstances that might cause problems include:

  • Premature birth
  • Difficult or traumatic birth
  • Medical problems or disability
  • Adoption or separation from primary caregiver

Where to go for help when your baby won’t stop crying

If your baby is crying or upset often, or unresponsive, you should seek help from your pediatrician or a child development specialist. Your pediatrician should be able to recommend a specialist in early infant behaviors to help you figure out if there is a problem and what to do about it. Alternately, contact the pediatrics branch in your local hospital and ask about services in your area, such as:

  • Parenting skills classes. Available in many areas, coaching and education for parents and caregivers can build necessary parenting skills and offer support and advice.
  • Support groups. Run by peers rather than professionals, support groups provide a safe environment to share experiences, advice, encouragement, and coping strategies for parents of babies who won’t stop crying.

Source: helpguide.org

Move The Sex Offenders Away From The Daycare

Move The Sex Offenders Away From The Daycare.

Good Morning, we want to remind everyone that this event on Facebook kicked off just over an hour ago.  We need to get as many signatures on this petition as possible.

https://www.change.org/p/apd-and-the-bcso-we-the-people-of-albuquerque-demand-that-apd-and-the-bcso-enforce-city-ordinance-and-state-statute-on-sex-offenders-for-the-safety-of-our-children

We urge everyone to join us, in our support of the children of this world.

Child abuse numbers up in the Texas Panhandle

AMARILLO, TEXAS — Amarillo College held their annual Child Abuse Prevention Conference at the Amarillo Civic Center.

Following a ten year trend where reported cases of confirmed child abuse in the Texas Panhandle held steady, the numbers of cases increased between 8.5 percent and 9 percent according to the Texas Department State Health Services.

“When we se this spike this is very alarming,” said Janice James, Child Abuse Prevention Specialist.

Like so many people who work in the respective field of child abuse prevention and neglect, Janice James is concerned following the announcement that confirmed cases of child abuse rose significantly in 2014 in the Texas Panhandle.

“We’ve got a lot of people as in the Health Department looking into that,” said James. “They can help us determine what we need to additionally.”

To help reduce the numbers, child abuse prevention advocates say it takes a combination of intervention and education and that to often the problem is passed down from one generation to the next.

“You have to break that cycle,” said Wendy Branstine, Region 16 Education Services Center. “It takes education and also unfortunately it also takes law enforcement because it goes to far just education is not enough.”

One of the reasons why cases of child abuse are not reported is due to victims being afraid or having a negative view towards law enforcement.

Sgt. Wade Pennington with Amarillo Police Department says they “encourage current or former victims to come forward and to not be afraid.”

“We generally tell the kids to get out and talk to someone who we can trust,” said Pennington. “Maybe a bus driver or the principal or coach or a teacher whoever that is we want them to talk to those people so that we can get the information from them.”

Once law enforcement gets the information they need they can begin an investigation.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

April was first declared Child Abuse Prevention Month by presidential proclamation in 1983.

1974 – Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA)

The first Federal child protection legislation, CAPTA was signed by President Nixon on January 31, 1974 and marked the beginning of a new national response to the problem of child abuse and neglect. The legislation provided Federal assistance to States for prevention, identification, and treatment programs. It also created the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (now known as the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect) within the Children’s Bureau to serve as a Federal focal point for CAPTA activities.

1982 – First National Child Abuse Prevention Week

In 1982, Congress resolved that June 6-12 should be designated as the first National Child Abuse Prevention Week.

1983 – April proclaimed the first National Child Abuse Prevention Month

In 1982, Congress resolved that June 6–12 should be designated as the first National Child Abuse Prevention Week; the following year, President Reagan proclaimed April to be the first National Child Abuse Prevention Month, a tradition that continues to this day. The Bureau’s National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect coordinated activities at the Federal level, including creation and dissemination of information and promotional materials. In 1984 for example, posters, bumper stickers, and buttons displayed the theme, “Kids—You can’t beat ’em.” Print, radio, and television PSAs, meanwhile, urged viewers to “Take time out. Don’t take it out on your kid.”

1984 – Child Abuse Prevention Federal Challenge Grants Act

The Children’s Bureau was an early supporter of State Children’s Trust Funds. Kansas was the first State to pass such legislation in the spring of, requiring revenues from surcharges placed on marriage licenses to be used to support child abuse prevention. By 1984, the number of States with Trust Funds was up to 15. That year, Congress passed the Child Abuse Prevention Federal Challenge Grants Act (title IV of P.L. 98–473) to encourage more States to follow suit. By 1989, all but three States had passed Children’s Trust Fund legislation.

Facts about Child Maltreatment

Child Maltreatment is a significant public health problem in the United States.

  • According to Child Protective Service agencies, more than 686,000 children were victims of maltreatment in 2012.
  • Another 1,640 children died in the United States in 2012 from abuse and neglect.
  • The financial costs for victims and society are substantial. A recent CDC study showed that the total lifetime estimated financial cost associated with just 1 year of confirmed cases of child maltreatment is $124 billion.

Abused children often suffer physical injuries including cuts, bruises, burns, and broken bones. Physical injury is far from the only negative impact of maltreatment—it can also affect broader health outcomes, mental health, social development, and risk-taking behavior into adolescence and adulthood.

Child maltreatment includes all types of abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18 by a parent or caregiver that results in harm or potential harm. There are four common types of abuse:

  • Physical Abuse is the use of physical force, such as hitting, kicking, shaking, burning, or other shows of force against a child.
  • Sexual Abuse involves engaging a child in sexual acts. It includes behaviors such as fondling, penetration, and exposing a child to other sexual activities.
  • Emotional Abuse refers to behaviors that harm a child’s self-worth or emotional well-being. Examples include name calling, shaming, rejection, withholding love, and threatening.
  • Neglect is the failure to meet a child’s basic physical and emotional needs. These needs include housing, food, clothing, education, and access to medical care.

Child maltreatment causes stress that can disrupt early brain development, and serious chronic stress can harm the development of the nervous and immune systems. As a result, children who are abused or neglected are at higher risk for health problems as adults. These problems include alcoholism, depression, drug abuse, eating disorders, obesity, high-risk sexual behaviors, smoking, suicide, and certain chronic diseases.

Child Maltreatment is Preventable

CDC works to stop child maltreatment, including abuse and neglect, before it initially occurs. In doing this, CDC promotes the development of safe, stable, and nurturing relationships and environments between children and their parents or caregivers.

Children’s experiences are defined through their environments (such as homes, schools, and neighborhoods) and relationships with parents, teachers, and other caregivers. Healthy relationships act as a buffer against adverse childhood experiences. They are necessary to ensure the long-term physical and emotional well-being of children.

We would like to take this time to say Thank You to some very special people and agency’s:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/

The United States Department of Justice
http://www.justice.gov/

The United States Department of Homeland Security
http://www.dhs.gov/

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
http://www.missingkids.com/

Child Welfare Information Gateway
https://www.childwelfare.gov/

The many hours we have used these websites, day and night, each with a seemingly unending supply of resources and educational material.

Without this valuable information, we would have been unable to put forth a quality product for Our Children.