Category Archives: Child Pornography

MEXICAN POLICE ARRESTED DUTCH CITIZEN SUSPECTED OF BEING LEADER OF INTERNATIONAL PEDOPHILE RING, MEXICO CITY’S AG

.jpg photo of Dutch citizen accused of being the leader of an international pedophile ring
Mexican Police Arrested Nelson Maatman, 27, suspected of being Leader Of International Pedophile Ring

Mexico arrests alleged leader of international child sex ring

MEXICO CITY  –  Mexican police have arrested a Dutch citizen accused of being the leader of an international pedophile ring,  Mexico City’s attorney general said.

The arrest was the result of a “broad investigation” by prosecutors in collaboration with the Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.),  Godoy said in a video posted on social media.

The O.U.R., dedicated to combating the sexual exploitation of children, reported the Dutchman’s presence in Mexico to the authorities.

The group “had information that Nelson ‘N’ was in our country, possibly in order to expand his human trafficking and child pornography network,” Godoy said.

Operation Underground RailRoad Team was able to successfully provide information to Mexico City authorities that led to the arrest of suspected pedoactivist Nelson Maatman.

The suspected boss of an international pedophile crime gang was arrested after he was found hiding out in Mexico City.

.jpg photo of alleged leader of international child sex ring
Mexico arrests alleged leader of international child sex ring.

Nelson Maatman, 27, was caught near a train station in the Mexican capital on Sunday.

According to local authorities, Maatman was caught in possession of a gun, cocaine, and electronic devices with child porn stored on them.

After arresting the suspect, authorities searched the place where he was believed to be staying in the north of the city and said they found photographs featuring child pornography, as well as computers, hard drives, memory cards and two Dutch passports.

Mexico City Attorney General Ernestina Godoy said Maatman was identified as the suspected leader of an international pedophile and child porn network.

Maatman founded the Party for Neighborly Love, Freedom and Diversity (PNVD), a political party in the Netherlands that is not represented in the Dutch Parliament, which supports the idea that laws should be introduced to allow sex with minors from the age of 12.

According to the investigation, the subject had, between 2014 and 2021, promoted various publications on social media that advocated the legalization of sex with children.

Nelson Maatman had been arrested several times in the Netherlands, the prosecutor said, but had been on the run since at least February of this year.

‘OPERATION BAD APPLE’ NETS 56 SEXUAL PREDATORS

.jpg photo of Child Predators arrested in Florida
Source: Osceola County Sheriff’s Office

Sexual Predator Sweep In Florida Results In 56 Arrests In ‘Operation Bad Apple’

OSCEOLA COUNTY, FL  –  The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office announced Monday that dozens of arrests have been made in “Operation Bad Apple.”

One such recent victory was won in Florida, where the Osceola County Sheriff’s Office worked with U.S. Marshals in “Operation Bad Apple” to round up and lock up a massive number of sexual predators, arresting 56 in the sweep.

The Sheriff’s Office said in a press release, “The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office in conjunction with the United States Marshals conducted Operation Bad Apple, which took place from March 28, 2022 through June 10, 2022.  The operation had a primary focus, but was not limited to; sexual offenders and sexual predators who have prior state or federal convictions for productions, transmission, and/or possession of child pornography/sexual performance of a child; transmission of harmful material to a minor; or video voyeurism.”

The press release concluded, “Operation Bad Apple resulted in 56 arrests of sexual offenders and predators in reference to violations of their statutory sex offense restrictions and or new law violations.  All arrestees were booked and transported to the Osceola County Jail.”

So, we are thankful their office was able to lock up a number of creeps and deviants, particularly those involved in horrific sexual crimes or activity involving children.

The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office is dedicated to serving our community and increasing public safety.  Anyone with information related to similar incidents, please contact the Osceola County Sheriff’s Office at (407) 348-2222.

SOLD FOR DRUGS, WOMAN DOES EVERYTHING POSSIBLE TO HELP TRAFFICKING VICTIMS

.jpg photo of Tonya Stafford and the neighbor who helped her break free from abuser.
Tonya Stafford and the neighbor who helped her break free from her abuser.

Her mother sold her for drugs when she was 14. Now, she spends her life rescuing fellow trafficking victims

DALLAS, TX  –  It took Tonya Stafford years to return to Bradshaw Street in southern Dallas.

When she finally did, about eight years ago, she felt afraid.

“It was a lot of emotions that came back,” she said.  “Because I thought of everything that had happened.”

Stafford lived in two separate houses on this street  –  although “lived” is a generous term.

She survived.  That’s a better way to put it.

Located just feet apart, those Bradshaw Street houses are the first and second homes Stafford lived in with the man who purchased her from her mother when she was 14 years old.  They’re the first two homes in which she was held captive, raped and abused for years.

“I was sold from the projects… the Turner Courts Projects,” Stafford said.

She’d been living their with her siblings, her mother and her mother’s husband.  Stafford’s mother had been in an out of their lives, while living with addiction.  She regained custody of Stafford and her siblings when Stafford was eight years old.  Up until then, they’d been living with their grandmother.

“It wasn’t something that was hidden from us,” Stafford said of her mother’s troubles. “Big Momma always just told us to respect her.  If we saw her walking down the street in South Dallas, we respected our mom.”

Stafford said her mother had started to do better when she regained custody, but the man she married was an addict and abusive.

“He immediately started raping us and molesting us,” Stafford said.  “So, that’s how our life took a turn for the worse.”

When Stafford and her siblings told her mother about the abuse, she said her mother’s husband claimed the children were trying to break them up.  She believed him.

Stafford said the family was also homeless for months at a time and bounced from hotel to hotel.

“He would get a room for them and a room for us,” Stafford said.  “Then he would get a room to take us into.”

Even then, Stafford still had hope.

“I wasn’t pregnant,” she said.  “I was an A student.  I was really smart.  My mentality was to make it out and never come back.”

Eventually, her family ended up at the Turner Courts housing project in southern Dallas, where Stafford said she and her siblings were allowed to freely come and go as they pleased, as long as they were home by dark.

She said she remembered she’d hang out with a neighbor, a women in her early 20s who was married and had kids.  Around that time, Stafford also remembered, she started noticing the man who’d become her abuser hanging around the neighborhood.

“I remember seeing him but not really paying attention cause I was playing with [my neighbor’s’] kids,” Stafford said.  “I didn’t know he had already started inquiring about us. Who was I?  ‘Who’s her momma?  What does that look like?’  They told him, ‘Her mom’s on drugs, and they don’t really care about them.’  He found his prey.  I was his prey.”

One night, when she was 13, Stafford said she was at her neighbor’s house, drinking what she thought was soda.  The man was there too.  Once she’d had a bit of what she later realized were wine coolers, she said she didn’t feel good.  She remembered the man telling her she couldn’t go home drunk.

She said he raped her that night.

“I got up,  I put my clothes on,  I went back to our apartment,” Stafford said.  “I didn’t say anything.”

A few weeks later, Stafford started feeling sick  –  and quickly realized she was pregnant.

“My daughter was born in 1988 in Mesquite Community Hospital,” she said.

Stafford was 14.  The father of her new baby was more than 10 years older.

Court documents provided to WFAA showed that Tonya was interviewed by a case worker who was investigating her mother and stepfather for child abuse involving another sibling.  The report detailed that Tonya was pregnant and that the father of her child was substantially older than she was.  The case worker noted that she asked Tonya if her mother had anything to do with what she referred to as her “relationship” with an older man, but never probed into any questions about abuse or the situation being troublesome.

“I knew then that we weren’t going to be saved,” Stafford said.

A few months after her daughter was born, Stafford said she was playing outside with other kids and had come back in to her house for some water when she noticed her belongings and her baby’s things had been packed up and placed by the door.

“She [her mother] said, ‘You got to go,'” Stafford said.  “I asked why: ‘Did I do something wrong?  Did I not clean up good enough?  What did I do?’  She just said again,  ‘You got to go.’  She pointed outside, and I saw his car waiting.  So, I took a deep breath, and I got in the car.”

Stafford said she went to live with with her abuser in his grandmother’s house  –  one of the homes on Bradshaw Street  –  where she was repeatedly raped and beaten.  After a year, she said they moved a few houses down on the same street.  A couple of years later, they moved to Pleasant Grove.

Stafford said she’d continuously tried calling her mother during this time, but never got an answer.  Eventually, she learned that her mother had changed phone numbers.  While she lived on Bradshaw Street, Stafford was just a few blocks from her family and the school she would have attended had she been able to leave the house.

“I really only left to go to church,” Stafford said.

She said her abuser took her to church every Sunday and Wednesday.

“I remember telling someone he was raping me, and they told me not to say that,” Stafford said.  “The first lady told me I should be glad someone bought me.”

Stafford said she lived with her abuser for 10 years.  During that stretch, she gave birth to two more children of his children.  She said no one at any of the hospitals ever questioned their situation.

“I don’t think they wanted to get involved,” Stafford said.

She was 24 when her life changed.  She has her neighbor to thank for that.

“She was the nosey neighbor,” Stafford said.  “She’d seen something.  She said something. And she did something.”

Stafford said her neighbor had noticed abuse in the home, and had spoken to her about it.
“Our cue was, if it gets bad, throw something out the window  –  or just come out and she’ll call the police,” Stafford said.

On the day she was rescued, Stafford said the abuse was particularly bad.

“He was angry,” Stafford said of her abuser.  “He was angry.  He just kept saying, I’m going to kill you.'”

Stafford said she’d gone to the bathroom, flushed the toilet and threw some things out of the window.  She said she tried to climb out of the window, too, but her abuser heard her, kicked down to the door, pulled her back into the house and threw her into the hallway.
“I asked him if I could go put my kids up, and I could come back and he could kill me,” Stafford said. “He said no, and he started choking me unconscious.  And that’s all I remembered.  I woke up.  My neighbor was kneeling next to me, and she was crying.”

Stafford said her neighbor heard the commotion and called the police.  By the time officers arrived, her abuser had run away.  Stafford and her children were taken to a shelter for domestic violence survivors in Irving.

“I got to be safe, and then I started therapy,” Stafford said.  “I love therapy.”

She still goes to therapy every Tuesday.

“It’s the first time I couldn’t lie,” Stafford said.  “I had to be honest about everything.   My kids got therapy too.  I think that’s ultimately what saved me.  I had never just been around a bunch of women.”

These women affirmed Stafford’s beauty, value and purpose.

When she finally was able to take her attacker to court,  Stafford said the judge apologized to her for a healthcare system and an education system that “failed” her.

“Then he said, “And I’m sorry, I have to fail you too,'” Stafford said.  “The statute of limitations had been reached.”

She was able to get a protection order  –  one that’s still in place  –  because of the domestic violence, but her attacker was never charged for the sexual abuse.  In fact, he was granted visitation with her children.

Stafford’s story is a hard one to hear, but it laid the foundation for the life-saving work she does now.

In 2014, Stafford started It’s Going to Be Okay Inc, an organization that helps rescue, house and heal survivors of human trafficking.  She now operates four safe houses for survivors across Dallas-Fort Worth.

“We’re providing direct services to human trafficking victims of all races and colors, but particularly Black girls,” Stafford said.

These are girls, Stafford said, that often go missing without extensive media coverage or resources devoted to finding them.

They’re girls like her.

Her story, Stafford said, is not entirely the same as the cases she deals with now.  But the foundations of trauma and abuse are the same.

“When you’re dealing with past trauma, it effects your post-trauma,” Stafford said.  “It’s how [these girls] are so susceptible to trafficking.  It’s the cycle of trauma, the generational trauma.”

Stafford’s work has been recognized around the country.  She works with local, state and federal law enforcement to help rescue trafficking victims and offer services to help them rebuild their lives.

She was recently recognized by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton for her efforts, and even received an honorary doctorate for her work.

“When I come across girls who look like me  –  the forgotten girls  –  and they say, ‘Ms. Tonya, thank you for coming, and thank you for providing what probably wouldn’t have been provided,’ that is my why,” Stafford said.

So, now, when Stafford finds herself on Bradshaw Street, she sees survival.

“I survived for them,” she said.  “I survived for me.  I survived for my children.  And not only am I surviving, I’m thriving.”

Is Hub City Dentist Part Of Jetset Child Porn Ring

.jpg photo of dentist arrested for child pornography
Former Lubbock dentist Jason White.

Former Lubbock dentist Jason White now charged with 16 counts related to child pornography

LUBBOCK, TX – Former Lubbock dentist Jason White is federally indicted on 16 counts relating to child pornography and enticement of a minor.  He was previously indicted on three counts.

A federal magistrate signed a superseding indictment on Wednesday afternoon for former Lubbock dentist accused of producing child pornography and the enticement of minors.

The new indictment accuses him of nine counts of production of child pornography, one count of transportation of child pornography and six counts of enticement and attempted enticement of a minor.  The previous indictment was for three counts: production of child pornography, transportation of child pornography, and enticement of a minor.

The new indictment shows the charges against White.  It indicates the enticement of minors may have begun in 2004 and continued through 2020, and the production of child pornography began in 2009 and continued through 2020.

The indictment identifies at least seven alleged victims while, according to court documents, as many as 15 juveniles were interviewed.

Eight counts of the production of child pornography are centered around John Doe 15 – which started in 2009 and continued through 2010.

Included in the documents is a forfeiture notice. bIf convicted, White will forfeit to the United States of America any visual depictions described in the federal documents.  It also includes any digital media seized by law enforcement, a house located in the 4400 block of 10th Street in Lubbock and the approximately 966-acre ranch located near Garza County, also known as the Drop Tine Draw Ranch.

The case:

On Jan. 14, 2021, FBI and Homeland Security agents, along with Lubbock Police, raided White’s dental office and home, removing items from the building and his vehicle.  During the raid, White was arrested and booked into the Lubbock County Detention Center.

Then on Jan. 20, 2021, new state charges were filed against White.  The warrant for the state he has been charged with sexual performance by a child.  These charges stem from the same allegations that brought on the federal charges.  A bond for the state charges was set at $150,000.  White’s attorney posted the bond, but because White was on a federal hold at the county jail, he was not released.

On Jan. 21, 2021, a civil lawsuit was filed against Jason White, accusing White of sexually assaulting a minor.  The plaintiff’s attorney, Kevin Glasheen, says Dr. White “apparently has a porn business,” which they have alleged in the lawsuit.  “He’s offered money to minor children for them to produce pornography.  He’s touched children inappropriately.  And this is apparently, according to the evidence that we’ve discovered, has been going on a long time and is widespread conduct that involves a lot of other people,” Glasheen said in a news conference in January.

They are suing White for at least $10 million.

The civil suit may not be resolved for a year and a half, because of the federal and state cases against White.

In the federal and state court documents, both complaints make mention of other adult males who may be involved in the sharing of child pornography with White.

During a news conference with Glasheen, he said, “We do have some idea, and it does, potentially, involve some very prominent people.  And I will say that because it is such a strong accusation and allegation that, you know, we’re not prepared to name those people at this time.  I’d like to go through the discovery process in the civil case, that means taking depositions of obtaining documents, and then we’ll see what kind of evidence the law enforcement authorities have.  Once Dr. White is indicted and the law enforcement authorities, the prosecutors, will have to hand over their evidence to him. That’s called Brady material, where defendants are allowed to see what the law enforcement has in a criminal case – criminal discovery they call it – and he’ll get that material and then we will get it from him.  We’re entitled to get that information from Dr. White.  So we’ll have all the federal evidence at that point.  Until then, we can attempt to take deposition testimony from both Dr. White and his partners.  I expect him to plead the fifth.  It will be interesting to see who else pleads the fifth as we move along through our process of taking issuing subpoenas and setting up depositions.”

On Jan. 25, 2021, a Federal magistrate judge denied White’s release from jail.  White will remain in jail until his trial.

In March 2020, a judge granted a motion to push the date of the child pornography trial of former Lubbock dentist Jason White, declaring the case complex after prosecutors stated more possible victims have come forward.  Jason White’s trial is reset to November 1, at 9 a.m. in the United States District Court.

O.U.R. Response To New York Times

Operation Underground Railroad Logo
Operation Underground Railroad

The New York Times Misses the Point:
Not Preventing Children from Being
Sexually Victimized Would be the Real
Misservice to Society

At Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.), we are extremely proud to play a small part in helping to protect our society’s largest silent political constituency—the children.

A just published New York Times magazine piece raised the issue of whether one law enforcement program trying to address the problem of child exploitation, OperationNet Nanny” in Washington State, is the right approach to apprehending would-be child sexual predators.

The Times’ reporting questions whether hundreds of perpetrators, particularly some young men in their 20s, who have been identified, arrested, and successfully prosecuted for taking part in online “Net Nanny” sting operations, are being unfairly targeted and too harshly punished.

Following our mission to help protect children from sexual exploitation, our organization has become a strong supporter of Operation “Net Nanny,” a preventative-minded child protection initiative the New York Times acknowledges has a 95% conviction rate in hundreds of cases that have gone to trial.  O.U.R. is proud to back this effort and others that help prevent children from being sexually victimized in the first place.

The select cases highlighted by the New York Times (out of hundreds) were largely those of young men in their 20s with no prior criminal records.  The Times chose to only mention in passing that “some caught in stings are violent predators.”  This included 60-year-old Curtis Pouncy, whom the Times noted has “a history of brutal sex crimes” that “included raping a 13-year-old girl he picked up from a bus station as well as a 19-year-old at knife point.”  Pouncy was arrested in a Washington State “Net Nanny” operation while on supervised release in early 2019.  He is now serving life in prison.

One of the hundreds of cases the Times did not highlight was that of Bryan Earle Glant, 24, of Seattle.  Glant, a well-resourced young man, was tried, convicted, and sentenced to nine years in prison on two counts of attempted first-degree rape of a child.  Emails and text messages contained in his court record show Glant arranging through online communication to meet “Hannah,” a police officer posing as a mother, to engage in sex acts with her two daughters, ages 6 and 11.  Glant did not just discuss doing something online.  His messages were not the mere unguided explorations of a young man.  No.  He acted, showing up at the agreed location with lubricant in his pocket.

Imagine if police and their Net Nanny operation were not on the other side of the door that day.  How would the lives of those 6- and 11-year-old children have been different?

At his trial and on appeal, Glant unsuccessfully tried to argue that O.U.R.’s support of the “Net Nanny” program was “outrageous government conduct.”  We were pleased that the court rightfully dismissed those claims.  We are also pleased the court reaffirmed our lawful ability and efforts to provide tools and resources to help law enforcement agencies get those who chose to prey on our children off our streets.

The New York Times led readers to believe that there were “no victims” in “Net Nanny” cases.  This is not factual.  “Net Nanny” cases did result in the rescuing of actual victims.  While the “Net Nanny” arrests of perpetrators did not involve physical contact with a child, in several cases victims of those arrested came forward or the Washington State Police found evidence where the predators did sexually abuse a minor.  The majority of victims who came forward in “Net Nanny” cases were under the age of 11.

Throughout the life of the “Net Nanny” program, law enforcement involved in its supervised multi-jurisdictional operations followed protocols—and the judicial system agreed, clearly finding there was no entrapment under long-standing and tested legal standards.

How the judicial system decides to serve justice on those lawfully charged with violating the law is an issue left for each state to determine, including the severity of sentencing for convicted child sex offenders.

In the end, keeping child predators off the street is paramount, and we will always support law enforcement in their legal efforts to protect children, hopefully before they are preyed upon.

We believe among the best tactics in the fight to bring child sex exploiters, propagators, and abusers to justice is supporting and helping arm the good guys with better technology and expertise.  Domestically, this involves public/private partnerships that help support the nation’s law enforcement officers and prosecutors at the federal, state, and local levels in their important work by providing technology, software, expertise, and training where taxpayer budgets fall short.

This also involves sharing the latest intelligence we glean through legally authorized work O.U.R. does internationally with law enforcement, NGOs, and governments to help rescue victims of child sex exploitation, abuse, and trafficking.  To date, O.U.R. has assisted in the rescue of more than 4,000 victims globally since our first international operation in 2014.

Since our founding, O.U.R. has always worked hand in hand with law enforcement in the U.S. and abroad, and we will continue to do so, helping to provide the necessary ammunition so they are well-armed and equipped to stop predatory trollers seeking their next child victim.

Our team is composed of top former federal, state, and local law enforcement professionals experienced in child exploitation, trafficking, and digital world policing.  One of our newest team members is the former head of the Washington State PatrolNet Nanny program, Carlos Rodriguez, who joined O.U.R. this year following a distinguished 27-year law enforcement career.

We are honored to have Carlos on our team now.  Together with professionals at all levels of the public and private sectors, we can pool our knowledge, resources, and collective passion to protect children at home and abroad to make sure shrinking budgets never deter anyone from the ultimate goal: safeguarding innocent children and bringing guilty perpetrators who seek to prey on them to justice.

Law enforcement and child protection advocacy groups have done unheralded yeoman’s work in the past 20 years to strengthen efforts to combat the unconscionable exploitation of children.  But there remains so much more that must be done.

Today, the sad truth is this:  we still do not know the full extent of the enticement, exploitation, and in far too many instances, the sexual assault, of children.  In the U.S., the most developed nation in the world, the country’s leading measure of criminal victimization—the National Crime Victimization Survey—still does not measure crimes against children under 12.

Those who want to underestimate scale of the problem or claim to know with certainty who is motivated to criminally victimize a child in the many forms it takes are not being truthful.  We simply don’t know.

What we do know with certainty is that with each passing day, our children are becoming even more dependent on the Internet and increasingly engaged in the exploration of online and digital virtual worlds, even more so in the present moment with millions still staying home because of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Honestly ask yourself this question—in the world we live in today, do we want law enforcement to have more resources, tools, and public and private support to combat child exploitation and abuse, or not?