Category Archives: Sexual Assault

Your Child Needs You – Pt 6

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Your Child Needs YOU, BEFORE It Is Too Late.

2016 STD Surveillance Report: STDs Tighten Grip on Nation’s Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Department of Health & Human Services

This year’s Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report, 2016, released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), marks the third year of overall increasing rates for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis.

While STDs can impact anyone, the new report underscores how disparities are deepening for the hardest-hit and most vulnerable groups:

  • Youth aged 15-24 continue to make up most reported chlamydia and gonorrhea infections, and are now experiencing syphilis increases.
  • Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to face the highest rates of syphilis and HIV co-infection.  Data from the STD Surveillance Network (SSuN) also suggest gonorrhea rates have increased among MSM for five years.
  • Pregnant women are experiencing some of the harshest outcomes from untreated STDs with the continued surge of congenital syphilis (CS) – where cases rise to numbers unseen since 1998.

The good news is that we can interrupt the steady climb in STD rates.  Doing so means that we must fully commit to doing what works AND to better understanding the changing face of the epidemic, as well as the real-world challenges that can stand in the way of preventing STDs.

Bringing the growing STD burden to a halt requires action by many. For example:

  • Here at CDC, we’ll continue monitoring national STD trends and for antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea; providing the most up-to-date screening, treatment, and other prevention services guidance; and funding health departments to help support their work to prevent STDs.
  • Health departments can continue to monitor and analyze their local STD burden; identify and link people with STDs and their partners to treatment and care; and disseminate up-to-date disease trends and clinical preventative resources to healthcare providers.
  • Providers can take routine sexual histories, as well as test, rapidly diagnose, and treat patients and partners as CDC recommends.

Together, we can make a difference, but it will take all of us – CDC, health departments, healthcare providers, community organizations, and individuals.

Louisiana is working to be that difference.  Their health officials are confronting, head on, some of the highest STD rates in the country.

By tackling their burden on multiple fronts, Louisiana is gaining ground in spite of an uphill battle.  For example, with syphilis, they’ve increased testing and reduced time to treatment in public health clinics.

In 2016, the number of CS cases decreased for the first time in five years.  With expanded extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia testing, they also diagnosed 165 cases that would have otherwise been missed.

These budding achievements are a strong reminder to us all that good prevention remains in reach.  Reversing our growing STD burden will take a lot of work, and it won’t happen overnight, but it is worth it.

At the end of the day, STD prevention is about more than stopping a single disease, it’s about safeguarding our quality of life.  I know it. You know it.  Let’s make sure that other people know it, too.

Here are some resources especially for you, as well as prevention materials you can share in your community:

CDC’s 2016 STD Surveillance Report website to find the report any related resources

A NEW infographic that you can adapt and use in your state

Sample Social media and social media ready graphics

Learn how to add CDC pages to your website

Fact Sheets about STDs

Posters, stickers, and other free STD prevention campaign materials

CDC’s STD website

Join the online conversation using #STDreport, and spread the word by retweeting @CDCSTD and sharing posts from the CDC STD Facebook page!

Sincerely,

Gail Bolan, M.D. Director, Division of STD Prevention National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

TX Volleyball Coach Found Guilty

.jpg photo of Coach found guilty of Child Sex Abuse
Damian Merrick

Former volleyball coach found guilty of
Child Sexual Assault

Dallas, TX  –  A former Grapevine volleyball coach has been found guilty of sexually assaulting a teenage girl and drug offenses.

Volleyball Club Owner Arrested Again

Damian Merrick was facing two charges of child sexual assault after he was accused of raping two girls, but he was only found guilty on one count.  He was also found guilty providing marijuana to the teen girls.

Jurors spent most of the day on Friday deliberating before reaching a guilty verdict.

Prosecutors argued that Merrick used alcohol and drugs to lure the teens during a team trip to Colorado.

Defense attorneys argued before the jury that Merrick had lost everything but his freedom.  During closing arguments, the defense told the jury the state had left too much reasonable doubt.  They pointed to inconsistent stories by two girls who testified Merrick sexually assaulted them when they were 16 and played on his volleyball team.

The jury deliberated for nearly 7 hours before reaching their verdict.

During closing arguments, attorneys from both sides made their points with the jury.

A Grapevine police detective testified Merrick had a sexual relationship with one of those girls for three months and raped a second girl in the bathroom at her friend’s house.

Merrick’s daughter tried to defend him.  She spoke on his behalf and said he never gave her drugs or alcohol, but she broke down crying after prosecutors poked holes in her testimony.

The judge began testimony of the punishment phase of the trial Friday afternoon.

Sex Predator Running From CA Warrant

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Calvin Lewis Jackson, 39

Police search for sex predator accused of
Child Abuse

JACKSONVILLE, FL  –  The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said it’s searching for a registered sexual predator accused of child abuse.

Calvin Lewis Jackson, 39, has an outstanding warrant for child abuse, the Sheriff’s Office announced Friday night.

Police said Jackson is known to visit the areas of Eagle Cove Road and Ridge Boulevard.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Sheriff’s Office at 904-630-0500 or email JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org.

To remain anonymous, contact Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.

DHS Settles Child Sex Abuse Case for $15 Million

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James Earl Mooney

Three Special Needs Children, 2-Days-Old to 3-Years-Old Sodomized

Oregon  –  It’s taken more than two years and hundreds of thousands of records, but nine medically fragile children who were once wards of the Oregon Department of Human Services and entrusted to its foster care program, will share a $15 million settlement reached Dec. 17 at the U.S. District Court in Eugene.

Steven Rizzo, of the Portland law firm of Rizzo Mattingly Bosworth PC, which originally sought $28 million on behalf of the children who were abused while under DHS purview, said the state agency made the settlement offer, subject to court approval, but did not admit to negligence.

The lawsuit was filed in June 2013 after James Earl Mooney, a former Salem resident, pleaded guilty in 2012 to five counts of first-degree sodomy of medically fragile children, ages 48 hours to 3 years, who had disabilities or other special needs.  Mooney was sentenced to 50 years in the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution for crimes that included sodomizing an 18-month-old foster baby in her car seat while his wife attended a doctor’s appointment with another foster child.  His earliest release date is June 20, 2061.

Rizzo, attorney for the unnamed minor plaintiffs, alleged that DHS and at least 21 of its current or former, named and unnamed employees were negligent and created dangerous living conditions for children who were wards of the court while in DHS custody.  All of the nine children have since been adopted or returned to their natural parents.

In the lawsuit, Rizzo alleged that in 2007, DHS, its supervisors, certifiers and caseworkers were responsible for initially certifying Mooney and his then wife to become a DHS-certified family.  The agency placed dozens of children in the Mooney home, and it was recertified in 2008 and again in 2010, the agency confirms.  Rizzo’s case argued that while the minor children were in the legal and physical custody of the DHS, it was duty-bound to protect their health, safety and well being.

The suit further alleged that DHS failed to conduct an adequate background investigation, failed to conduct a comprehensive inquiry into Mooney’s history and family dynamics, and failed to request or require the Mooneys to provide copies of medical reports.  It said DHS was negligent in failing to conduct adequate fitness determinations for Mooney and his wife, and that it failed to obtain or review other criminal records, and adequately weigh Mooney’s history of potentially disqualifying (for foster-parent status) crimes.

The complaint against DHS points out that Mooney was raised in a dysfunctional family, and had watched his father act incestuously with his adolescent sister.  It also contended that Mooney molested infants in the family’s in-home day care, and engaged in bestiality with dogs and cats.

This negligence, Rizzo said, was a substantial factor in causing the injuries and damages suffered by the plaintiffs.

Monday, DHS Interim Director Clyde Saiki said in a prepared statement that DHS had discovered that there were errors with regard to the certification and recertification of Mooney’s home, and had agreed to the settlement.

“DHS knows, understands, and admits responsibility for the damages suffered by these innocent victims,” Saiki said.  “The settlement reflects the agency’s accountability for failing to ensure the safety of these children in its care.”

“We believe the settlement is reasonable, and one of the largest, if not the largest, settlements the agency has had to pay,” Rizzo said. “But we endured a lengthy series of motions and discovery disputes since we filed,” Rizzo said.

The case started in front of District Court Judge John Acosta in U.S. District Court in Portland, and the settlement was accepted by federal Judge Michael McShane in Eugene.

“We feel we achieved a successful outcome for the families,” Rizzo said.  “These same families are hopeful DHS will take the preventative measures necessary to make sure this doesn’t happen to another child.”

In November, Gov. Kate Brown ordered an independent review of the child welfare practices at the state Department of Human Services.  The state also plans to hire independent third-party to investigate problems at DHS’s child welfare program.  The state’s advisory committee will focus on oversight and licensing, cultural responsiveness, abuse and neglect investigations, accountability within the agency and financial stability of foster care providers.

Saiki said he is already conducting an internal investigation of this particular matter to determine how it happened and why DHS failed to protect the children.

“As soon as possible, I will take the appropriate action to see that system failures are corrected, and that the appropriate personnel action(s) is taken,” Saiki said.

How Can CPS Be Above The Law

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Stop CPS Corruption

NOT ONE STATE CPS IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA MEETS EVEN MINIMUM STANDARDS SET DOWN BY OUR LAW MAKERS!!!!

NATIVE AMERICAN GIRL KIDNAPPED BY STATE OF MISSOURI

How can CPS Employees submit manufactured instruments in a Court Of Law in The United States of America and not be held accountable for their actions????

How can the rape and molestation of Our Children while in CPS care be ignored????

How can so many Children die while in CPS care year after year, yet they are not held accountable????

Disproportionality and disparity in the child welfare system

In the United States, data suggests that a disproportionate number of Native American children enter the foster care system. 

Differing rates of disproportionality are seen at key decision points including the reporting of abuse, substantiation of abuse, and placement into foster care. 

Research has shown that there is no difference in the rate of abuse and neglect among minority populations when compared to Caucasian children that would account for the disparity.

I want you all to know that CPS is so corrupt that while they can’t coverup the extreme number of Children stolen from Native American Families, their far-reaching lies corrupt as much as possible of what is written for the public to see.  CASE IN POINT, the above paragraph is wrong on one very important point:

In cases of Sexual Assault and Child Sexual Assault, over 80 to 85% of the time it is Family or someone close to family, in every race but two (2), and those are Alaskan Native and Native American.

– Alaskan Native and Native American Girls and Women know the perp in LESS THAN 30% OF THE CASES!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WB0m_XNU7E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aelBIbfmzU

http://fightcps.com/

Title 42 United States Code Section 1983 states that citizens can sue in federal courts any person who acting under a color of law to deprive the citizens of their civil rights under the pretext of a regulation of a state.