Category Archives: Good People

Do You Let People In Your House Without Asking

.jpg photo of Good Parents and Junior
AH, come on Dad, I can get my own fish, please Dad please, let me go with you…

ATTENTION:  One by one, your accounts
are being hacked due to poor security

DO YOU WANT TO STOP THIS BEFORE IT HAPPENS TO YOU????

#1 – DO NOT LEAVE ANY EMAIL IN YOUR ACCOUNT FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME THAT YOU DO NOT KNOW WHO IT IS FROM PERSONALLY!!!!  DO NOT JUST DELETE IT, MARK IT AS “SPAM“, AND WHEN ASKED, REPLY “YES, REPORT THIS”.

#2 – Start keeping your email account as near EMPTY AS POSSIBLE, this is not always people from another country… If there is any doubt about what I mean by this, just ask me privately.

#3 – Change your password NOW!!!!  Then, make your new password unique, at least 12 – 15 characters long, with a mixture of caps, little letters, numbers, and symbols.

#4 – TURN ON TWO (2) STEP VERIFICATION, AND USE IT EVERYTIME.

#5 – When you see a friend wanting to be your “Friend” on Facebook, get a screenshot if at all possible, and TELL YOUR FRIEND IMMEDIATELY!!!!  Then, contact FB Support IMMEDIATELY!!!!  FB Messenger is very vulnerable due to users being complacent about security.

#6 – Get a top-of-the-line Security Suite, NOT A FREE ONE.  Your family is worth it, and you will sleep better.  My Security Suite covers 5 devices, and my Wi-Fi.  Then set your “HOME” network as “PRIVATE” not “PUBLIC”.   Use a “PUBLIC” Wi-Fi as little as possible, and then, only if you have a very good Securiy Suite.  NOTE:  Children should not be allowed to use a “PUBLIC” Wi-Fi.  It is a Parent’s job to supervise their Children 24/7, and teach them the proper, secure way in our digital world.

#7 – I also utilize a top-of-the-line VPN, I suggest you all do also.  Once again, your family is worth it, and you will sleep better.

#8 – This is not the end of everything I could bring up, like apps for children’s devices, or not putting your families info on a page for the world to see, and certainly not posting pictures of your family or even your children.  HOWEVER do not post less than fully dressed pictures of children!!!!

#9 – NOW, last but not least, how do you find out if your lack of proper security has set you and your family up for, at the very least, mental abuse…. or possibly a site did not do their job of making sure your data was secure????  These money people are getting off with symbolic slaps on the hand for BEING COMPLACENT WITH YOUR DATA!!!!  I have just what you all need to find out if your email address has been compromised, AND you can setup notifications for future breaches.

have i been pwned?

O.U.R. Response To New York Times

Operation Underground Railroad Logo
Operation Underground Railroad

The New York Times Misses the Point:
Not Preventing Children from Being
Sexually Victimized Would be the Real
Misservice to Society

At Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.), we are extremely proud to play a small part in helping to protect our society’s largest silent political constituency—the children.

A just published New York Times magazine piece raised the issue of whether one law enforcement program trying to address the problem of child exploitation, OperationNet Nanny” in Washington State, is the right approach to apprehending would-be child sexual predators.

The Times’ reporting questions whether hundreds of perpetrators, particularly some young men in their 20s, who have been identified, arrested, and successfully prosecuted for taking part in online “Net Nanny” sting operations, are being unfairly targeted and too harshly punished.

Following our mission to help protect children from sexual exploitation, our organization has become a strong supporter of Operation “Net Nanny,” a preventative-minded child protection initiative the New York Times acknowledges has a 95% conviction rate in hundreds of cases that have gone to trial.  O.U.R. is proud to back this effort and others that help prevent children from being sexually victimized in the first place.

The select cases highlighted by the New York Times (out of hundreds) were largely those of young men in their 20s with no prior criminal records.  The Times chose to only mention in passing that “some caught in stings are violent predators.”  This included 60-year-old Curtis Pouncy, whom the Times noted has “a history of brutal sex crimes” that “included raping a 13-year-old girl he picked up from a bus station as well as a 19-year-old at knife point.”  Pouncy was arrested in a Washington State “Net Nanny” operation while on supervised release in early 2019.  He is now serving life in prison.

One of the hundreds of cases the Times did not highlight was that of Bryan Earle Glant, 24, of Seattle.  Glant, a well-resourced young man, was tried, convicted, and sentenced to nine years in prison on two counts of attempted first-degree rape of a child.  Emails and text messages contained in his court record show Glant arranging through online communication to meet “Hannah,” a police officer posing as a mother, to engage in sex acts with her two daughters, ages 6 and 11.  Glant did not just discuss doing something online.  His messages were not the mere unguided explorations of a young man.  No.  He acted, showing up at the agreed location with lubricant in his pocket.

Imagine if police and their Net Nanny operation were not on the other side of the door that day.  How would the lives of those 6- and 11-year-old children have been different?

At his trial and on appeal, Glant unsuccessfully tried to argue that O.U.R.’s support of the “Net Nanny” program was “outrageous government conduct.”  We were pleased that the court rightfully dismissed those claims.  We are also pleased the court reaffirmed our lawful ability and efforts to provide tools and resources to help law enforcement agencies get those who chose to prey on our children off our streets.

The New York Times led readers to believe that there were “no victims” in “Net Nanny” cases.  This is not factual.  “Net Nanny” cases did result in the rescuing of actual victims.  While the “Net Nanny” arrests of perpetrators did not involve physical contact with a child, in several cases victims of those arrested came forward or the Washington State Police found evidence where the predators did sexually abuse a minor.  The majority of victims who came forward in “Net Nanny” cases were under the age of 11.

Throughout the life of the “Net Nanny” program, law enforcement involved in its supervised multi-jurisdictional operations followed protocols—and the judicial system agreed, clearly finding there was no entrapment under long-standing and tested legal standards.

How the judicial system decides to serve justice on those lawfully charged with violating the law is an issue left for each state to determine, including the severity of sentencing for convicted child sex offenders.

In the end, keeping child predators off the street is paramount, and we will always support law enforcement in their legal efforts to protect children, hopefully before they are preyed upon.

We believe among the best tactics in the fight to bring child sex exploiters, propagators, and abusers to justice is supporting and helping arm the good guys with better technology and expertise.  Domestically, this involves public/private partnerships that help support the nation’s law enforcement officers and prosecutors at the federal, state, and local levels in their important work by providing technology, software, expertise, and training where taxpayer budgets fall short.

This also involves sharing the latest intelligence we glean through legally authorized work O.U.R. does internationally with law enforcement, NGOs, and governments to help rescue victims of child sex exploitation, abuse, and trafficking.  To date, O.U.R. has assisted in the rescue of more than 4,000 victims globally since our first international operation in 2014.

Since our founding, O.U.R. has always worked hand in hand with law enforcement in the U.S. and abroad, and we will continue to do so, helping to provide the necessary ammunition so they are well-armed and equipped to stop predatory trollers seeking their next child victim.

Our team is composed of top former federal, state, and local law enforcement professionals experienced in child exploitation, trafficking, and digital world policing.  One of our newest team members is the former head of the Washington State PatrolNet Nanny program, Carlos Rodriguez, who joined O.U.R. this year following a distinguished 27-year law enforcement career.

We are honored to have Carlos on our team now.  Together with professionals at all levels of the public and private sectors, we can pool our knowledge, resources, and collective passion to protect children at home and abroad to make sure shrinking budgets never deter anyone from the ultimate goal: safeguarding innocent children and bringing guilty perpetrators who seek to prey on them to justice.

Law enforcement and child protection advocacy groups have done unheralded yeoman’s work in the past 20 years to strengthen efforts to combat the unconscionable exploitation of children.  But there remains so much more that must be done.

Today, the sad truth is this:  we still do not know the full extent of the enticement, exploitation, and in far too many instances, the sexual assault, of children.  In the U.S., the most developed nation in the world, the country’s leading measure of criminal victimization—the National Crime Victimization Survey—still does not measure crimes against children under 12.

Those who want to underestimate scale of the problem or claim to know with certainty who is motivated to criminally victimize a child in the many forms it takes are not being truthful.  We simply don’t know.

What we do know with certainty is that with each passing day, our children are becoming even more dependent on the Internet and increasingly engaged in the exploration of online and digital virtual worlds, even more so in the present moment with millions still staying home because of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Honestly ask yourself this question—in the world we live in today, do we want law enforcement to have more resources, tools, and public and private support to combat child exploitation and abuse, or not? 

WI Man Charged With Felony Child Abuse

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Justice for Child Abuse

Green Bay man charged with Child Abuse, strangulation and suffocation

GREEN BAY, WI  –  A Green Bay man has been formally charged in Brown County court for allegedly abusing his daughter.

According to court documents, Brave Cannon, 39, was charged Thursday with one count of child abuse – high probability/great harm, with another charge of strangulation and suffocation, as well as disorderly conduct.

The disorderly conduct charge is classified as a misdemeanor, while the other two are classified as felonies.

Documents state the incident happened just before 12 p.m. on July 15 on Elmore Street.

The victim told police on July 17 that she had had some friends that went over to her father’s home on the 15 to have pizza and hang out, and that her father hadn’t been home when they got there.

However, she then went to take a shower, and when she got out, her father was yelling that she had too many friends over, and told police she could smell alcohol on his breath, and knew he was drunk.

She told police Brave became angrier, and yelled more, after which she told everyone to leave and started packing up her things.

When she went back to the bathroom for her shoes, Brave allegedly pushed her very hard, and then grabbed her around her neck and squeezed.

She then said that it had hurt, she couldn’t talk and it was difficult to breathe.

Eventually, the victim was able to get out of that, but then said Brave put her in a headlock for around 30 seconds, and he threw her head against the wall.

The victim’s cousin then entered the house after hearing a commotion, and told Brave to let his daughter go or they would call the police, which he complied to.

Court records haven’t updated to show when Brave’s next court date is.

KS Business Man In Jail On $400K Bond

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The owner of a Manhattan, Kansas restaurant on Tuesday was bound over for trial in Riley County District Court on 26 counts of child sex abuse.

Owner of Manhattan, Kansas restaurant bound over on 26 child sex counts

MANHATTAN, KANSAS  –  The longtime owner of a Manhattan restaurant has been bound over on 26 charges of sexual abuse against minors, KMAN Radio reports.

Arraignment is scheduled for July in Riley County District Court for Robert Iacobellis, 62, the owner of Bob’s Diner.

Charges range from aggravated indecent liberties to rape and sodomy.

KMAN reports that 24 of the counts carry a life sentence.

During a preliminary hearing Tuesday in Riley County District Court, three victims testified that Iacobellis touched, fondled or sexually assaulted them on numerous occasions, sometimes when they were as young as 7 years old, KMAN reports.

Iacobellis will be tried on 16 counts against the first victim, including charges of rape and sodomy;  six counts of aggravated indecent liberties against a second victim; and four counts against a third victim.

During testimony at Tuesday’s preliminary hearing, one of the victims alleged the abuse began when her mother — who is a former weekend employee at Bob’s Diner — had Iacobellis watch her while she went to work.  That victim alleged the abuse continued until January 2019.

Judge William Malcolm found enough probable cause from the testimony to proceed to trial.

Iacobellis was arrested in August 2019.  An amended complaint listed 130 total charges against the three alleged victims.

Iacobellis will be arraigned at 2:30 p.m. July 6 with Judge Kendra Lewison presiding.
According to KMAN, Iacobellis remains jailed on a $400,000 bond.

DHS: Protecting Our Children

.jpg photo of U. S. Department of Homeland Security Blue Campaign Logo
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to protecting children from abuse and educating them about how to protect themselves.

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month

BLUE BULLETIN CAMPAIGN

April 2020 has been proclaimed by the President as National Child Abuse Prevention Month.  The proclamation calls upon individuals to be aware of children’s safety and well-being, and to support efforts that promote their psychological, physical, and emotional development.  April is also a time to highlight the importance of working together to prevent the abuse and neglect of children.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to protecting children from abuse and educating them about how to protect themselves.  U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) created the Angel Watch Center in 2016 to expand its work with foreign law enforcement partners, alerting them about the intended travel by convicted registered child sex offenders from the United States to their countries.  The Center ultimately aims to stop the spread of transnational child sexual abuse.

Additionally, ICE Homeland Security Investigations (HSI)’s Project iGuardian program provides children, teens, parents, and teachers with information regarding the potential dangers of online environments and how to stay safe online.  The iGuardian program team is committed to providing safety tips, a number to call, and resources to the public to avoid falling victim to online sexual predators.

As part of HSI’s Operation Predator, which was first launched in 2003, HSI has arrested more than 31,000 individuals for crimes against children, including the production and distribution of online child exploitation material, traveling overseas for the purpose of sexually abusing minors, and sex trafficking of children.  In fiscal year 2019, more than 3,900 child predators were arrested by HSI Special Agents under this initiative and more than 1,000 victims were identified or rescued.

To report a crime, you can utilize the HSI online tip form.  Report suspected child sexual exploitation or missing children to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children® via its toll-free 24-hour hotline at 1-800-843-5678.

News You Can Use

COVID-19 Resources, Services, and Support (Office of Health & Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children & Families)

The Office on Trafficking in Persons (OTIP) is focused on preventing human trafficking and working to ensure that children and adults who have experienced trafficking and their families get the support and care they need to live safe and healthy lives.  This focus remains the same during responses to public health emergencies such as COVID-19.  As in times of disaster response, HHS recognizes that disruptions to local services, housing and economic stability, and social disconnection can further increase risk for victimization and exploitation.

ICE HSI Shares Tools to Keep Children Safe Online (ICE)

Across the country, children have shifted to virtual learning which results in significantly more time spent online.  In order to protect them, the Child Exploitation Investigations Unit at HSI reminds families that the agency has a variety of tools available on its iGuardian webpage to keep children safe while using the Internet.

School Closings Due to COVID-19 Present Potential for Increased Risk of Child Exploitation (Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI))

Due to school closings as a result of COVID-19, the FBI is seeking to warn parents, educators, caregivers, and children about the dangers of online sexual exploitation and signs of child abuse.

The Effect of COVID-19 on Human Trafficking (Polaris)

The National Human Trafficking Hotline is fully operational during this health emergency.  Polaris is continuing to update its website with resources and information for survivors.

Social Media Shareables

Tag Blue Campaign on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using @DHSBlueCampaign. Each month we share content you can distribute on your social channels to raise awareness of human trafficking in your communities.

  • Do you know how to stay safe online? Learn more from @DHSBlueCampaign: https://bit.ly/2xhHBJW
  • Predators and traffickers can gain access to victims online because people are not always aware of how dangerous these environments can be or how to keep themselves safe.  Learn more from @DHSBlueCampaign:
    https://bit.ly/2xhHBJW
  • The Internet is a great way to stay in touch, but predators and traffickers oftentimes stalk online meeting places such as social media sites to lure their victims.  Learn more from @DHSBlueCampaign: https://bit.ly/2xhHBJW

For more information visit the Blue Campaign

To report suspected human trafficking: 1-866-347-2423

To get help from the National Human Trafficking Hotline: 1-888-373-7888
or text HELP or INFO to BeFree (233733)