Category Archives: Law Enforcement

PROTECT ALL CHILDREN

.jpg photo of Child Abuse Graphic
Be The Difference, Protect ALL Children From Child Predators.

End The Silence: a documentary to shine a light on Child Abuse on the eastern shore

SALISBURY, Md  –  It’s an ugly topic that is swept under the rug far too often, child sex abuse.  It’s a taboo subject both nationally and right here on the eastern shore.

Now a documentary, shot on the eastern shore by Urban Vision Works, is telling the stories of several eastern shore women.  Their tragedies, their hardships, and their triumphs.

End The Silence: a documentary

The statistics are shocking.  According to Victims of Crime, a website with national statistics on child abuse, one-in-five girls, and one-in-twenty boys, are victims of sexual abuse.

“These numbers are incorrect, the actual statistics are:  Child rape occurs every two minutes.  1 in 3 girls will be sexually molested before the age 17, and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually molested before the age 17 (1 in 5 in Canada).
A sex offender will molest an average of 120 victims, most of whom do not report it, and 90% of molesters abuse children they know.”
Robert StrongBow

“What we learned and what I personally learned is once you start talking about it, once you actually get somebody not to be hush-hush and quiet and talk about it then you realize they know somebody who knows somebody,” says Oasis, the executive producer of the documentary.

The idea for the documentary was born from Wanda Martin Palmer, the founder of #ProtectOurGirlsCampaign.

Wanda says she and her daughter were victimized by the same person, prompting her to create the campaign, which she now uses to give resources and information to other victims.

“She’s going to make sure that it goes to the highest level as it can possibly go,” says Javenna Smith Myrieckes, director of the film.

End The Silence, which centers around Palmer, brings out a series of emotions, from anger to sadness.

“A couple of the young ladies have such extreme experiences that what makes it difficult for them to go on is that some of the predators and violators are still in their family structure,” said Javenna.  “And then, I start to find out about their victories and their healing, and I actually start to get a little afraid. Because it’s a subject matter that not everyone wants to avoid and ignore.”

The hope is this film will accomplish its two main goals.  To show victims that there are ways to get the help they need, and to begin the conversation, a conversation long overdue.

“It’s not going to be the perfect discussion, it’s uncomfortable.  But it’s necessary,” said Javenna.

End The Silence will premiere at the Black Diamond Lounge in Fruitland on August 24, and again at the Senator Theater in Baltimore on August 30.

You can find out more information at endthesilencedocumentary.com.

Time To Do The Time

.jpg photo of Washington HHS employee accused of Child Sexual Abuse
Rodolfo DeLeon makes a first appearance in Yakima County Superior Court Friday, May 4, 2018.

Report:  State employee who investigates
Child Abuse tells police he has sexually abused several kids

YAKIMA, WA  –  A state Child and Family Services employee whose job involved investigating child abuse and neglect walked into a Yakima police station and said that he had sexually abused five kids during the past eight years, the Yakima Herald reported Friday.

The 50-year-old state employee told police he knew the alleged victims, but that they were not children that he came into contact with as part of his job, the newspaper reported.

Child and Family Services is a division of the state Department of Social and Health Service (DSHS).

According to court documents, the man came into the police station Thursday and said he had sexually abused five children over a period of years, from 2010 to as recently as April 2018.

Police said the victims were believed to be under the age of 12 when the alleged sexual abuse first occurred, the newspaper said.

The man had his first appearance in court on Friday.  The investigation is continuing.

Q13 News typically does not name a suspect until he or she has been formally charged.

NXIVM Leader And Actress In Custody

.jpg photo of actress arrested for recruiting women as sex slavess
Allison Mack accused of recruiting women for sex-cult leader

‘Smallville’ actress Allison Mack accused of
recruiting women for sex-cult leader

Actress Allison Mack, best known for her decade on TV’s “Smallville,” and Keith Raniere, the leader of what authorities allege is a sex cult, were indicted Friday in New York on federal charges of sex trafficking and conspiracy to commit forced labor, the Albany Times-Union reported.

Raniere and Mack are each charged with multiple counts, and could face a minimum of 15 years in prison.  Mack was arrested in New York City on Friday and will be held pending a bail hearing Monday.  Raniere has been in custody since he was arrested in Mexico in March.

Raniere is the founder of NXIVM, which bills itself as a self-help and empowerment organization, but is described by authorities as a cultlike group whose members recruited women to be sex slaves, and branded their pubic regions with Raniere’s initials.

The Rochester Democrat & Chronicle said Mack was indicted “for her role in DOS, a group … that purported to be a women’s empowerment sorority. Prosecutors, however, say DOS was actually a sex-slave ring led by Raniere, with women known as ‘slaves’ who reported to ‘masters’ who ultimately reported to Raniere himself.  Mack is an alleged co-conspirator, reporting directly to Raniere.”

Mack, 35, is alleged by prosecutors to have recruited slaves for pay, forcing the women to have sex with Raniere, and using explicit photos and damaging information to ensure their compliance.

According to the Associated Press, prosecutors said Mack told recruits that they were joining a female mentorship group.

“Mack and other … masters recruited … slaves by telling them that they were joining a women-only organization that would empower them and eradicate purported weaknesses the NVIVM curriculum taught were common in women,” prosecutors said.

But “the victims were then exploited, both sexually and for their labor to the defendants’ benefit,” said U.S. Attorney Richard P. Donoghue of the Eastern District of New York in Brooklyn.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Moira Kim Penza also said in court that “under the guise of female empowerment,” Mack “starved women until they fit her co-defendant’s sexual ideal,” the AP wrote.

Mack starred in the CW Network series about Clark Kent’s youth in Smallville, Kan. before he became Superman, playing Clark Kent’s friend Chloe Sullivan from 2001 to 2011.  She has also been in a handful of television series roles since, according to her IMDB page.

According to CBS News:

Former NXIVM publicist Frank Parlato told Inside Edition that Mack is “completely enamored with Raniere and completely under his thrall.”  He also said that Mack and her “Smallville” co-star, Kristin Kreuk, were used as “poster girls for normalizing the group.”  Kreuk says she left NXIVM years ago and commended the women who exposed DOS.

Raniere, 57, known to his followers as ‘the Vanguard’ — was living in a villa in Puerto Vallarta with several women, according to federal prosecutors, before he was apprehended in March.  Mexican authorities took him into custody and delivered him to Texas; he’s now in federal custody in Brooklyn.  As Raniere was taken from the villa,  The Post’s Kyle Swenson wrote, citing prosecutors, the women chased after authorities in their own car at high-speed.

“In my opinion, NXIVM is one of the most extreme groups I have ever dealt with in the sense of how tightly wound it is around the leader,” cult expert Rick Ross told the Times-Union in 2012.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn last week wrote in court documents that Rainere has “a decades-long history of abusing women and girls,” and accused him of having sex with minors.

In a statement attributed to Raniere on NXIVM’s website, he proclaimed his innocence and said he believed the justice system would prevail.  He also denied affiliation with DOS, the sorority.

The Times-Union, however, wrote that “federal court records indicate emails seized from Raniere’s private messaging accounts support the conclusion that Raniere created the club, which was known as ‘Dominus Obsequious Sororium,’ which means ‘Master Over the Slave Women.’ ”

In Harm’s Way – Part 2 Of 2

.jpg photo of two Law Enforcement Officers that covered the child abuse death of Tramelle Sturgis
Former Metro Homicide Assistant Commander Dave Wells, and South Bend Police Detective Jim Taylor.

What’s changed since Tramelle Sturgis’s
Child Abuse death?

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY, IN (WNDU)  –  After the 2011 child abuse death of Tramelle Sturgis, so many people in our community were committed to figuring out what could have been done differently.  What, if anything, has changed since then?

Indiana’s child welfare system is under the microscope.  Leadership changes, funding cuts and staggering abuse rates have made troubling headlines.

The last director resigned last December in a scathing letter to Governor Eric Holcomb.  Mary Beth Bonaventura blasted the Holcomb administration for cuts and management changes that she said would “…all but ensure children will die.”

In February of this year, federal figures showed a spike in child abuse deaths in the Hoosier state.

Around here, the 2011 death of Tramelle Sturgis still haunts our community.

Warnings were there.  Tips were received.  But still a child died.  Has anything changed?

Tricia Sloma learned what happened after the boy’s death in part two of her series “In Harm’s Way.

Tramelle’s art teacher Sandy Voreis says his artwork stood out.  As she admired his self-portrait, she pointed out some special features.

“He even has a sun out, if you notice, for sunshine,” said Voreis.  “The colors are not dark.  They’re bright, vivid colors.”

Tramelle’s choice of color and content never led on to what was happening at home.

“There is no sadness in that picture,” said Voreis.  “I didn’t catch on what was going on by the picture.”

When the young artist was murdered by his father, Terry Sturgis, the difficult news was shared the next morning at school.

“It was such a shock.  He didn’t let on,” said Voreis, shaking her head.

Tramelle may have never let on to her, but other teachers say they knew.  A teacher and other school staff testified at the murder trial saying they had reported suspected abuse only to be threatened by the angry father.

“It was rough,” Voreis said as she broke down in tears.

While Tramelle’s pictures never revealed his pain, other pictures tell a much different story.

“That’s the image that sticks with me,” said former Metro Homicide Assistant Commander Dave Wells as he thumbed through evidence photos from the murder scene of a 10-year-old boy.

“(The photos) documenting fresh injuries, old injuries, lots of scarring.  Just head-to-toe trauma,” observed Wells, who is now the commander of the St. Joseph County Drug Investigations Unit with the St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office.

He joined South Bend Police Detective Jim Taylor for an interview about the Sturgis case.  Taylor used to work for Metro Homicide and investigated Tramelle’s death.  He’s now with the Violent Crimes Division of the South Bend Police Department.

Tramelle’s death remains one of the worst child abuse fatality cases police have ever seen.

Wells and Taylor weren’t surprised that Tramelle and the other children hid their pain so well.  It was part of the killer’s control and a grandmother’s neglect of care.

“(Terry Sturgis) knew those kids were going to school, so he dressed them appropriately so nothing would come back on him,” said Wells.

“And explained to those kids, ‘You better not say a thing to anybody or it’s going to be worse when you get home,’” added Taylor.

“The problem grandma (Dellia Castile) has is that she knew exactly what was going on in that house,” said Wells.  “And it’s her responsibility, it’s all our responsibility to report any kind of abuse like that to children.”

But in the Sturgis case, people did report the abuse.

The Department of Child Services and police were called to the home, but in every instance, officials didn’t find a problem.

Wells says police had very little information to go on from a 911 call placed months before the murder.

“This is what the officers see when they investigate an anonymous tip,” said Wells, as he held up a picture of the Sturgis home from inside the front door. “That’s a pretty clean, nice looking house.  And then there are four or five kids standing here and there are allegations of child abuse, and they’re looking at the kids going…(shrugs) I’m not seeing anything here.”

“You’re limited by how far you can go,” explained Wells.  “Without good probable cause or a search warrant, you’re not going to get into that house any farther than the front doors.”

Remember, in Tramelle’s home, the torture happened in the basement, a sad discovery made only after Tramelle died.

“You walk in and you almost want to go, ‘Are you in the right house?’  And then you hit that basement,” said Taylor.  “And it’s just like, wow!”

“There were certainly signs that were probably missed by all of us,” said Wells.

But most notably DCS.  At one time, all 92 Indiana counties had their own child abuse hotline staffed by local people.  To save money, the state moved to a centralized hotline in Indianapolis in 2010, the year before Tramelle died.

Former South Bend Tribune reporter Virginia Black discovered a call placed to the DCS hotline six months before the murder, with the anonymous caller begging officials to “….go there right now….”  Instead, the Tribune reported, DCS responded the next day and didn’t make contact with the family for three more days.  By then, all seemed fine.

So what’s changed?

“Well, we certainly made great progress on the hotline, and that is due to Tramelle,” said St. Joseph County Circuit Court Judge John Broden.  Broden was a state senator at the time.  He said the discovery of that call woke up the Indiana Legislature.

“There had been isolated concerns over parts of the state that calls were being dropped.  Complaints weren’t getting through.  It wasn’t until Tramelle’s death and the incident surrounding Tramelle’s death,” explained Broden.  “That instantly brought it to the forefront.”

Today, there’s still one child abuse hotline number, but now calls are answered in five locations: Vanderburgh, Lawrence, Marion, Blackford and St. Joseph counties.  It’s staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

“It was no longer just a South Bend, St. Joseph County issue.  It was a statewide issue,” said Broden.  “And Tramelle’s death did cause significant changes and improvements to the child welfare system.”

But there’s still a lot of work to be done at the state level.

While shrinking funds and leadership changes are debated downstate, officials on the front lines back home are working closer together to make sure another child like Tramelle doesn’t get missed.

Sloma asked St. Joseph County Prosecutor Ken Cotter if our area children are better off than they were seven years ago.

“Locally?  Yes,” said Cotter.  “I think we have a much better relationship with DCS now than before this occurred.”

Cotter noted the biggest change with local DCS officials.

“I think the biggest change is in communication between the information that they are gathering and passing it along to law enforcement so that we can act as well.”

But the most important partnership is the community, and everyone plays a role.

“When you think a child is being abused, gosh darn it, contact someone so we can find out so that we can do the best investigation that we can,” urged Cotter.

“I think a lot of people have learned from this as a community,” said Taylor. “Enough’s enough.”

Our community is forever changed by one little boy.

“It’s something we will never forget,” said Voreis.  “What scares me is other children that are going through this, and not speaking up and not saying anything.  We don’t want something like this to happen again.”

Governor Eric Holcomb ordered a full review of the Department of Child Services after the DCS director’s resignation.  That report is expected in June.

The new DCS Director, Terry Stigdon, released this statement to WNDU on Friday afternoon:

“The children DCS serves aren’t just names in a system—each and every one of them has a story, and we find those stories are filled with pain.  In my short time as director, I’ve been meeting with passionate DCS employees across the state who show up to work every day trying to make a difference in a child’s life.  My job is to remove obstacles that are in the way of that child having a safe and stable home.  I look forward to the results of the CWG assessment because the recommendations will act as a guide for how we can improve and identify our needs – which fulfills the ultimate goal of keeping our children safe.”

Remember, if you suspect child abuse, please report it.

In Indiana, the child abuse and neglect hotline is 1-800-800-5556.

In Michigan, the number is 1-855-444-3911.

We have incredible community resources for families who are broken by abuse:

YWCA
ywcancin.org/site/pp.aspx?c=6oJKL0PuF8JSG&b=7960705
1-866-YES-YWCA

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)
sjccasa.org
574-233-CASA

Casie Center
casiecenter.org
574-282-1414

Youth Services Bureau
ysbsjc.org

St. Joseph County Family Justice Center
fjcsjc.wordpress.com
574-234-6900

Oaklawn
oaklawn.org
574-533-1234

Family & Children’s Center, Healthy Families
fccin.org/healthy-families.html

Child and Parent Services CAPS, Elkhart County
capselkhart.org

Indiana 2-1-1
For helpful information, just dial 2-1-1

Prevent Child Abuse St. Joseph County
pcasjc.org

Healthy Families in St. Joseph County
fccin.org/healthy-families.html
574-968-9660
Voluntary home visiting program providing new parents with support, parenting skills, information on child development and community resources.

KidsPeace
kidspeace.org

NYAP – National Youth Advocate Program
nyap.org

The Villages in Elkhart
villages.org/venue/elkhart-the-villages-office
Information about becoming a foster parent

White’s Residential & Family Services
whiteskids.org
Information about becoming a foster parent

In Harm’s Way – Part 1 Of 2

.jpg photo of two cousins that was abused with all children in the family
Jon’Nae Copprue, 18, was just 12 when cousin Tramelle Sturgis, 10, lost his life.

South Bend Child Abuse survivor remembers cousin’s death

** WARNING: Graphic MaterialTrigger Warning

SOUTH BEND, IN (WNDU)  –  Child abuse is a dark secret that seems to only come to light when a child is badly hurt, or worse, dies.

Federal figures showed a sharp rise in child abuse fatalities in the US with most of the increase happening in two states: Indiana and Texas.

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, from 2015 to 2016, Indiana’s child abuse death toll more than doubled from 34 to 70.

There’s a lot of blame to go around, from the state’s opioid crisis to an overwhelmed child welfare system.

But ultimately, it’s what’s going on behind closed doors, the abuse and neglect that put children in harm’s way.

Around here, there’s one case that shook our community to its core: the death of 10-year-old Tramelle Sturgis.  It’s been nearly 7 years since his murder in a South Bend home.

“At least once a day I drive by this house, but I never stop,” said Detective Jim Taylor.  “This is the first time.”

Taylor may be a 20-year veteran officer with the South Bend Police Department, but what happened inside a house on West Washington still gets to him.

“It’s probably, if not the, worst case we’ve ever worked,” said Taylor.  “Just to stand in front of this house brings back so much horrific terror.”

Ten-year-old Tramelle Sturgis lost his life during a night of torture in the basement.

Tramelle and his older brother suffered countless blows and burns from their father, Terry Sturgis.

Their grandmother, Dellia Castile, was upstairs, and while she knew about the ongoing abuse, she didn’t stop it.

Both are in prison.

“He fought for so long.  Not just him, but his brothers and sisters.  The rest of those kids in that house,” said Taylor.

Eight other kids lived in that house.  They were siblings and cousins who faced a much different sentence as survivors of child abuse.

“Nobody knew what happened.  People might say they did, but nobody knew what happened but the ones that lived in the home,” said Jon’Nae Copprue.

Jon’Nae is one of the children who lived in the home.

“I felt like one of us was going to die.  I felt it and I always said it,” said Jon’Nae.

She was just 12 years old.

“I always felt like something was going to happen.  Somebody was going to get hit too hard and go to the hospital or one of us was going to end up dead.  I always felt like it was going to happen,” she said.

It did happen, to Tramelle.

“I’m not happy about him being dead, but I’m also like maybe this was our way of getting out.”

Jon’Nae is 18 now and lives in a foster home outside of the Michiana area. She’s pregnant with her third child and finishing up her GED.

“I’m slowly still trying to deal with it.  I can say I’m dealing with it better than I used to, because I got kids and they are amazing,” Jon’Nae said.

Jon’Nae and her siblings were being raised by their grandmother when the abuse took place.  Jon’Nae spoke exclusively with WNDU’s Tricia Sloma about what it was like to live in that home.

Jon’Nae says she was abused by her mother, her older sister and her cousin’s killer, her Uncle Terry.  He was the person she feared the most.

“He was always upset, he was always angry,” remembered Jon’Nae.  “Always ready to release his anger on somebody.”

“The way that the power of his arm when he was swinging, then whoopin’ us with poles and sticks and anything he could get his hands on.  You bound to break a bone or anything,” said Jon’Nae.

“(They) hit us with crowbars, extension cords, anything they could pretty much get their hands on,” explained Jon’Nae.

Terry made sure their injuries weren’t visible.

“We really didn’t wear dresses, shorts or anything like that because we had bruises,” said Jon’Nae.  “We would wear long thermals to cover scars up.”

Jon’Nae says she’s never had a best friend, and kids at school were mean.

“I would not want to be around other kids because I feel they would hate on me, see my scars, they would pick on me.  So I would be just like, alone,” said Jon’Nae.  “I felt like I was the only one, other than my brothers and my sisters.  I just felt like nobody, nobody cared.”

Months before Tramelle’s death, the Department of Child Services (DCS) was called to the home.  There was another time that police showed up.  But in every instance, authorities found nothing wrong.  The kids were instructed to lie.

“So it was like nobody cares.  After a while I think we just stopped caring.  It was just a normal thing to us.  It was just life,” said Jon’Nae.  “It was going to happen forever.  Probably until we moved out of the house.”

Or until, in Tramelle’s case, someone died.

“November 4, 2011.  The worst day of my life.  The day my cousin died.”

Jon’Nae was upstairs with her grandma that night.  She heard and witnessed things that will never leave her.

“You can still hear the screams.  I went downstairs and I seen a couple of things myself.  My cousins being tied up to poles, naked.  Just being tied up to poles, mouth was taped.   They was getting hit in the head.  Punched in the chest.  It was something I’d never seen before.  Worse than he ever did anything,” recounted Jon’Nae.  “That night?  I don’t think anybody could forget it.  And after that it just went downhill from there.”

After Tramelle’s murder, Jon’Nae and her siblings were separated from her cousins and put into foster care.  She admits to acting out and acting up.

“I can say for a while I was really aggressive.  My head was messed up.  After that I was really angry.  I just wanted to fight everybody.  Smoke.  Drink.  Do anything to hold the hurt in,” said Jon’Nae.  “I didn’t care about what anybody said.  I just wanted everything to end.”

Jon’Nae estimates she’s been in nine or ten foster homes, juvenile detention and residential care.

“Me and the foster parents got into it because we didn’t know each other.  It’s kind of scary going into different homes and different families because you don’t know anything about them, they don’t know anything about you they don’t know about your emotions.  They don’t know about your past,” explained Jon’Nae.

“I’ve been in so many schools.  I’ve never stayed in a school since I’ve been in the system.  Since I’ve been in foster care,  I’ve never stayed in a school more than six months,” said Jon’Nae.

Jon’Nae wishes her grandma never went to prison.

“My grandma, she never whooped us,” defended Jon’Nae.  “For people that think she’s more responsible.  She’s responsible in a way, but everything is not up to her.”

When Sloma pointed out that Castile was the only adult living in the home that could’ve stopped it, she replied,  “Yeah, but imagine you having fear. Imagine you having a lot of fear.  You don’t know what’s going to happen.  You have fear of him and you also have fear of losing your family.”

“If it was all up to her, it was all up to us too.  Because we stayed there.  We got mouths, we could’ve said something.  We was old enough to say something, but it’s the fear that got to us.”

It was the fear and trauma that fractured a family.

“I miss him every day,” said Jon’Nae.  “That’s one of my biggest scars, and the other scar is not having that family.”

Jon’Nae says she’ll never forget Tramelle and doesn’t want you to forget him either.  She would like to continue her education and someday work in the legal profession helping victims of child abuse.

If you would like to report child abuse, please contact authorities at the following numbers.

In Indiana, the child abuse and neglect hotline is 1-800-800-5556.

In Michigan, the number is 1-855-444-3911.