Category Archives: Murder

Father charged after 5-month-old dies from injuries

Father abused child
Edwin Alexander Andrade-Ramos

Arlington, Texas – A father is accused of injuring his daughter so severely that the 5-month-old later died.

Edwin Alexander Andrade-Ramos, 27, was arrested by Arlington police on Wednesday and faces a charge of injury to a child/serious bodily injury.

Police said the child suffered multiple fractures on her body and a serious head injury.

The child’s mom said when she arrived home from work on Jan. 28, she noticed her daughter, Marjorie Ramos-Pena, wasn’t eating and was acting differently. The child eventually became unconscious and was rushed via ambulance to a local hospital.

The baby was treated, but died from the injuries Wednesday – the same day Arlington police arrested Andrade-Ramos for an August assault on the baby’s mother, who is his common-law wife.

He later earned the charge of serious bodily injury to a child.

The mother works overnights at a nearby Wal-Mart and would often leave Marjorie and her two other children in the care of Andrade-Ramos. The same was true on Jan. 28.

Andrade-Ramos remains in custody at the Arlington City Jail.

AM I MISSING SOMETHING HERE????

Ohio delays execution of child killer

Man that killed 3-year-old
Ronald Phillips

COLUMBUS – Ohio said Thursday that it’s dropping the two-drug combination administered to an inmate who repeatedly gasped and snorted during a troubling 26-minute execution.

The state prisons agency also said it will again allow the use of an anesthetic that it used from 1999 through 2011.

The announcement that it’s adding thiopental sodium back to the execution policy immediately raised questions of where the state would obtain such a drug.

In 2011, the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction switched to pentobarbital when the manufacturer restricted thiopental sodium’s distribution, making it impossible to obtain for executions.
As part of Thursday’s announcement, the state said the Feb. 11 execution of a condemned child killer is being delayed as the agency secures supplies of the new drug.

The state said in addition to delaying the execution of Ronald Phillips, set to die for the 1993 rape and killing of his girlfriend’s 3-year-old daughter, other executions might also be delayed.

Kasich signed a bill into law last month that would shield the names of companies providing lethal drugs to Ohio. The goal of the bill is to make it easier to obtain compounded pentobarbital, the state’s first choice for executions but which it hasn’t been able to find.

Four death row inmates have sued over the new law, saying it restricts information that helps inform the public debate over capital punishment.

Child Killed In Washing Machine

Joseph Blocker
Joseph Blocker

Texas Dad freed after son killed in washing machine

Joseph Blocker was facing capital murder charges in the death of his 4-year-old son, Koda, but Garland police turned him loose Friday. Investigators say more work is needed.

A Texas Dad, who was jailed after his 4-year-old’s washing machine death, walked free on Friday as cops vowed to keep investigating. Garland police dropped capital murder charges against 28-year-old Joseph Blocker, saying they have more work to do. “There comes a time when you need to file formal charges, and we’re not there yet,” police spokesman Joe Harn told the Dallas Morning News. “You’ve got to get everything right — especially a capital murder.”

Blocker called 911 on Tuesday afternoon to report injuries to his boy, Koda, but the child was already dead when emergency responders arrived, authorities said. The little boy was apparently trapped inside a washing machine and sent tumbling when someone hit the power button on the front-loader, authorities said. “That door has to be shut and then someone has to push a button on the outside to get that started,” Harn told Fox 4 on Wednesday. “It does not start by automatically shutting that door.” Investigators were still waiting an official cause of death, but Koda’s injuries match the inside of the washing machine, police said.

Blocker was arrested shortly after the boy’s body was discovered, despite the support of friends and relatives who told reporters the father of two would never harm his son. Blocker’s other child, age 22 months, is with the mother, the Dallas Morning News reported.
Cops haven’t revealed what led them to release Blocker, but his attorney issued a statement of gratitude, calling the recent days “very tragic and deeply emotional.”

“We are thankful for his release and applaud the officers of the Garland Police Department for their professionalism during the investigation,” attorney Chris Knox said. “However, Mr. Blocker and his family have suffered a tremendous loss and, because of the whirlwind of activity, have not yet been able to properly grieve.”

It’s one of THEM times

Stanton Dreymala
Stanton Dreymala

Notorious Houston serial killer up for parole

A mother and father from Pasadena drove to an office building in Angleton Thursday for a closed-door parole hearing on one of Houston’s most notorious killers.

Their son, a 13 year-old boy named Stanton Dreymala, may not be remembered by many people in the Houston area, but what happened to him is seared in the collective memory of a generation of Houstonians. He was one of at least 28 boys and young men lured to a horrifying death in what became known as the Houston mass murders. “He was just a normal 13 year-old,” said his mother, Elaine Dreymala. “He went to school, he rode his bike, he mowed lawns for his spending money.”

Between 1971 and 1973, a man named Dean Corrl recruited two teenaged accomplices – David Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley – to entice other youngsters to his homes, where they were drugged, raped and sexually tortured – sometimes for days – before they were murdered. Some of the terrified victims were forced to write notes telling their mothers they were leaving town shortly before they were killed.

The boys’ disappearances were mostly dismissed as cases of runaways until one day in August 1973, when Corrl tried to kill Henley and Henley somehow managed to shoot Corrl dead. Henley and Brooks then led law enforcement authorities on a gruesome search for the buried corpses of their victims. Both of the surviving killers were sentenced to life in prison.

Since then, both of them have occasionally come up for parole. And although there seems little chance either of the notorious serial killers would be freed by a Texas parole board, the hearings tear at the psychological wounds imposed on the victims’ families and friends. “We can’t hardly bear to go through this, since there’s two of them,” said Eliane Dreymala. “That’s about every year and a half for us.”

Henley has attracted more media attention than Brooks since their incarceration. An art gallery in Houston’s Montrose area once hosted an exhibit of his paintings, which he has offered for sale. And a few years ago, he allowed himself to be interviewed and photographed by an author.

But some of the victim’s families believe Brooks is more culpable in the killings than Henley. “Brooks, of course, recruited Henley,” said Andy Kahan, the City of Houston’s crime victim advocate. “And essentially, he marched 28 young boys to their deaths knowing full well the sadistic type of torture they would receive before they were brutally killed.”

The headlines in newspapers saved by the victims’ families have faded, but their determination to keep the killers behind bars has not. Every couple of years, one of the two murderers comes up for parole. And loved ones of the victims mount campaigns to keep them in prison.

The Dreymala’s appearance before a parole board in Angleton Thursday was especially poignant. They are now the last surviving parents to have lost a child in the Houston mass murders. “And when we have to go through it, it brings back all the memories, all the horror,” said Elaine Dreymala, Stanton’s mother. “And it’s just not right. We feel victimized every time we have to do it.”

Of course, nobody’s forcing them to appear before the parole board. But even though a parole for such notorious killers seems unlikely, the Dreymala’s think their appearances are important. “Every time we come up here, we think it’s possible,” James Dreymala said. “Not probable. But we would feel really, really stupid if he was paroled and we weren’t here to fight it.”

That’s why they plan to join other victim rights advocates lobbying Texas legislators for a change in state law that would allow officials to wait five years between parole hearings for killers like Henley and Brooks. Right now, Kahan said, there’s a disparity in the law decreeing that convicts guilty of lesser crimes can wait five years between hearings, but some of the state’s most heinous murderers are eligible every three years.

However often the parole board holds its hearings, the Dreymalas plan to return every time. “There is no earthly reason why they should ever be paroled,” Elaine Dreymala said. “And we’ll fight it as long as we are alive.”