Category Archives: Ouality Time

WARNING Killer targets Children alone In Hot Vehicles

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Your Child Needs You to Love and Supervise them.

Parents arrested after toddler son is
found dead in hot car on 90-degree day

#HotVehicles Are Not #BabySitters  #HeatStrokeKills  #LookBeforeYouLock  #PassTheHotCarsAct

An Alabama couple is facing criminal charges for the death of their toddler son, who police said was found dead Sunday in a hot car.

The toddler was found unresponsive on the spot

Officers were sent to Hodges around 4:00 pm. against the background of reports of a three-year-old child with no answer in the car.  Franklin County Police said in a statement that an ambulance attempted to resuscitate the boy, but he was pronounced dead on the spot.

The boy’s parents, 20-year-old Dakota Fowler and 21-year-old Brandy Burks, reportedly said they last saw their baby at midnight as they put him to bed.  When they woke up at 3:00 pm, they couldn’t find their son and found him in the car, police said.

Investigators identified the deceased child as Bentley Fowler.

Autopsy reports revealed that the toddler died due to heatstroke

On Sunday the temperature in Hodges reached 93 degrees.  Although Fowler and Burks were arrested and charged with manslaughter, Franklin County Sheriff Shannon Oliver called their son’s death an accident.

The baby’s body was sent to the Alabama Department of Forensic Medicine for an autopsy.   Records show Fowler and Burks remain in prison.

According to No Heatstroke, Bentley Fowler became the 15th Child to die in a hot car this year.  In 2019, 52 children died from car heatstroke.

Every Child Deserves Good, Loving Parents.

I Have An Update From KidsandCars.org

Unfortunately, there have been 15 hot car deaths this year in the U.S.  Not surprisingly, given the pandemic and children being home more frequently, the percentage of children that gained access to a vehicle on their own is nearly double the average this year (47% this year vs 26% on average).

Today, Thursday, August 13th KidsAndCars.org is joining the National Highway Safety Administration  and is hosting a Tweet-up to raise awareness about preventing hot car deaths.  Please join us in posting throughout the day using the hashtags #heatstrokekills, #lookbeforeyoulock and #passtheHotCarsAct

WARNING Child Killer Still Out There

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Your Child Needs You to Love and Supervise them.

Killer Takes Children Unattended In Vehicles

On Monday, July 20, 2020, the 11th Child this year was taken in Arkansas while playing in a vehicle.  Her 15-month-old sister remains in critical condition.

Two days earlier, on Saturday July 18, 2020, the killer was there in Texas when the little boy climbed into the vehicle and started playing.  There were no eye witnesses when the unseen stalker took the 10th Child this year.

In Kentucky, Saturday July 11, as the little girl played in the vehicle, someone had to see and know the danger, even before the 9th Child was taken.

Every one of the Children on this list lost their lives due to HEAT STROKE.

How many Children were VICTIMIZED by Child Abuse, Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Mental Abuse, and/or Trafficking just this year?

Our Children are easy prey when left unsupervised and many parents mistakenly believe their Children are safe indoors.

The internet is a cesspool of perverts and pedophiles doing everything possible to lure Children to them.

Nothing can replace Parental Supervision and Quality TimeMissed Quality Time is gone forever, and can never be made-upGood memories are easy to make and free for the making during Quality Time.

When children grow up in safe, stable, and nurturing relationships and environments, they learn empathy, impulse control, anger management and problem-solvingall skills that protect against violence.

Every Child Deserves Good, Loving Parents.

So You Are Expecting A Baby

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Your child deserves good parents.

Baby Proofing Essentials

Start Early

It may seem odd to baby-proof your home when your infant can’t even roll over yet, but you may be surprised at how soon he’ll be getting around and getting into things.   So it’s never too soon.  Take the time to baby-proof when your little one is still brand new or even before he arrives.

Tie It Down

Time to secure your TVs and furniture — just in case.  Use furniture straps to hold TVs, bookshelves, dressers, and other heavy furniture in place in any rooms where your child might be left alone, even for a minute.  Don’t put a TV on top of a dresser — the drawers can be used for climbing.  Put corner or edge bumpers on any furniture with sharp edges.

Potty Precautions

You might not see your toilet as a hazard, but the water in it, and the toilet lid, can be a danger for a curious child.  So prevent any problems: Remember to always keep toilet lids down and secured with a lid lock.

Control Your Cords

Use cord holders to keep longer cords fastened against walls.  That way, your little one can’t tug on a tangle of computer cords and other electrical wiring.  That could keep your baby safe from electrical hazards or heavy equipment that falls after a couple of tiny tugs.

Give Baby a Safe Night’s Sleep

Make sure your baby’s crib has fixed rails.  Or if you must use an older crib, don’t use the drop-side rail, or get an immobilizer for it.  (Cribs with drop-side rails are banned.)  Test the crib to make sure your baby can’t fit his head between the slats.  If you can slide a soda can between the slats, they’re too wide.  Always keep soft items like blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, and bumpers out of your baby’s sleep space.

Manage Your Medication

Store all medicines in a high, locked cabinet.  Never take medicine out of its original childproof container.  Try not to take medicine in front of your child or he may want to imitate you.  Never call medicine “candy.”  And don’t flush old pills down the toilet. Get rid of them through your local drug take-back program, or put them in a sealed bag with something your child won’t want to eat — like kitty litter or coffee grounds — and throw it in the trash.

Blind Danger

Tie all blind cords high out of reach, or cut the ends and attach breakaway safety tassels.  Never put a crib or child’s bed near window blinds or drapes.  Those dangling cords can be a choking risk.

Prevent Shocks

Put outlet covers on all exposed electrical sockets to keep your little one from getting an electric shock.  Some small outlet covers can be a choking hazard if a baby or toddler pries them out of the wall.  Look for “childproof” covers that require two hands to remove or cover plates that screw on.  For double protection, place large furniture in front of outlets.

When It’s Time for a Change

You’ll probably be surprised at how fast your baby learns to roll over — and the changing table becomes a falling hazard.  Be sure your changing table has safety straps and always buckle up when diapering your child.  Don’t ever leave baby alone on the table.  Plan ahead and have all the items you need — diapers, wipes, baby cream, nail clippers, and a small toy — handy before you start to change the baby.

Lock It Up

Protect curious kids from household cleaners and other chemicals by storing those items in locked cabinets or installing safety latches that lock when you close the cabinet door.  Do the same for any low cupboards that contain risky items like small appliances.  For added safety, store hazardous items up high and far away from small fingers.

Safety in the Car

Keep your baby safe in your car, too — in a rear-facing car seat until he’s 2.  Don’t use a car seat if you don’t know its history.  It may have been involved in a car crash or it may be past its expiration date.  Avoid a used car seat that looks damaged or is missing parts or the instructions.  Avoid recalled models, too.  You can find out more about car seat safety from the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (http://www.safercar.gov).

Tub Time

Make tub time fun, but safe, for your little one.  Prevent scalding by adjusting your hot water heater so that the water is no hotter than 120 degrees.  Install no-slip strips on the bottom of your tub and a soft cover on the faucet to protect tender heads.  Most important, never leave your baby or toddler alone in the tub, even for a moment.

Limit Baby’s Movement

If there are some rooms you don’t want to baby proof, use baby gates to keep your little one from getting into them.  Also install gates at the top and bottom of the stairs beforeyour baby gets mobile.  Don’t use accordion-style gates, which could trap the baby’s head.  Look for gates that attach securely to the wall but won’t pinch small fingers.

Prevent Window Falls

Place your child’s crib and other furniture away from windows.  Don’t rely on standard window screens — they’re meant to keep insects out, not children in. Instead, install childproof screens, or even better, window guards, which are proven to prevent falls.

Around Pools and Water Features

Take steps to safeguard areas around pools, hot tubs, and other home features with standing water, like fish tanks and ponds.  Backyard pools should be completely surrounded by a 4-foot fence, preferably with a self-latching gate.  Pool covers and alarms may provide additional protection.  Don’t leave toys floating in pools.  And just like in the tub, never take your eyes off a child near water.

Practice Toy Safety

Baby toys should be safe for babies.  Your child’s toys should be much larger than his mouth, to prevent choking.  Check that all the parts attached to a toy — like doll eyes or teddy bear bows — are securely fastened and can’t be torn off.  Remove mobiles attached to a crib as soon as your baby can push up on his hands and knees.

Unplug Appliances

You may leave appliances such as the toaster, coffee maker, or paper shredder plugged in for convenience.  But some appliances can harm your child if she turns them on, pulls them down on her, or gets tangled in a cord.  Unplug them when you’re not using them and put them away, out of reach, if you can.

Alarms

Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are essential to your family’s safety.  Install a smoke alarm outside every bedroom or sleeping area, and make sure there’s at least one on every floor.  Don’t put smoke detectors near the kitchen or bathroom — these areas can trigger false alarms that may leave you inclined to ignore them.  Check the batteries every month.

Choose a Safer Toy Box

Choose a toy box with a safe design.  Avoid containers with hinged lids that slam down.  You want one with a light, removable lid or one that slides.  If yours has a hinged top, make sure it has a lid support that can prop the lid open.  Pick a toy box with ventilation holes or a gap beneath the lid — in case a kid climbs in.

Get Your Child’s Point of View

The best way to baby proof is to see things the way your baby does.  Get down on your hands and knees and crawl around.  What’s at baby’s eye level and within easy reach?  Kids can be curious about anything they see, like computer cords and glassware on low shelves.  You might not notice breakable or hazardous items when you’re towering above them.

Resource: WebMD.com
Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on September 27, 2019

A Strong Successful Family

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Good caring parents teach by example, always remembering that genuine praise, guidance, and understanding are the mark of a good parent.

Building & Maintaining A Good Family

Building a Good Family

There are basic qualities and values needed to have and maintain a good family.   These qualities and values are:

  • Love
  • Honor, always truth and loyalty
  • Mutual Respect
  • Kindness
  • Communication
  • Consideration
  • Duty
  • Responsibility

The Future of this world

Children are the future of this world.  As a good parent it is your responsibility to teach your children from birth, the above qualities and values, as these are handed down from generation-to-generation, and prepares them to be good family members, good friends, good neighbors, good employees, good leaders, and good citizens.

Good caring parents teach by example, always remembering that genuine praise, guidance, and understanding are the mark of a good parent.  As your child grows, regular family quality time strengthens trust and mutual respect, forging a stronger family bond, where communication grows easier, and good memories are more easily made.

Maintaining A Good Family

The five “L’s” of a good, strong, family:

  1. Love is at the heart of the family.  All humans have the need to love and to be loved; the family is normally the place where love is expressed.  Love is the close personal blending of physical and mental togetherness.  It includes privacy, intimacy, sharing, belonging, and caring.  The atmosphere of real love is one of honesty, understanding, patience, and forgiveness.  Such love does not happen automatically; it requires constant daily effort by each family member.  Loving families share activities and express a great deal of gratitude for one another. Love takes time, affection, and a positive attitude.
  2. Learning – Families are where we learn values, skills, and behavior.  Strong families manage and control their learning experiences.  They establish a pattern of home life.  They select appropriate television programs.  They guide their children into the world outside the home.  They do not let social forces rule their family life.  They involve themselves in neighborhood, school, government, church, and business in ways that support their family values.  Strong families teach by example and learn through experience as they explain and execute their values.
  3. Loyalty – Strong families have a sense of loyalty and devotion toward family members.  The family sticks together.  They stand by each other during times of trouble.  They stand up for each other when attacked by someone outside the family.  Loyalty builds through sickness and health, want and good fortune, failure and success, and all the things the family faces.  The family is a place of shelter for individual family members.  In times of personal success or defeat, the family becomes a cheering section or a mourning bench.  They also learn a sense of give and take in the family, which helps prepare them for the necessary negotiations in other relationships.
  4. Laughter is good family medicine.  Humor is an escape valve for family tension. Through laughter we learn to see ourselves honestly and objectively.  Building a strong family is serious business, but if taken too seriously, family life can become very tense.  Laughter balances our efforts and gives us a realistic view of things.  To be helpful, family laughter must be positive in nature.  Laughing together builds up a family.  Laughing at each other divides a family.  Families that learn to use laughter in a positive way can release tensions, gain a clearer view, and bond relationships.
  5. Leadership is essential.  Family members, usually the adults, must assume responsibility for leading the family.  If no one accepts this vital role, the family will weaken.  Each family needs its own special set of rules and guidelines.  These rules are based on the family members’ greatest understanding of one another. The guidelines pass along from the adults to the children by example, with firmness and fairness.  Strong families can work together to establish their way of life, allowing children to have a voice in decision making and enforcing rules. However, in the initial stages and in times of crisis, adult family members must get the family to work together.

Angels Walk Among Us

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Abusing a Child

Abusing a Child…

We want to say Thank You to Secret Angel for allowing us to share this post.  But what I really want to say is a Heart Felt THANK YOU!!!! Secret Angel, for caring so much for all Children.  Secret Angel’s Blog is The Abuse Expose’ with Secret Angel. Stop by and give her your support, you don’t have to say I sent you, read her work then tell her how much we all appreciate her.

Posted on September 4, 2018 by secretangel

Abusing a child…
is something we never want to see…
but it happens often…
in so many a family.

via Abusing a Child…