Category Archives: Special Needs

SC Teacher Receives 3 Years for Abusing Special Needs Child

.jpg photo of Abusive Teacher
Anna Rogers

HORRY COUNTY, SC  –  A former Horry County teacher charged with unlawful conduct toward a child has pled guilty to the charge Monday afternoon, and must turn herself into police by Friday.

In April 2013, police charged Anna Rogers after authorities say a then 5-year-old special needs student brought a recorder to Forestbrook Elementary School and secretly recorded the teacher.

The arrest stemmed from an incident on March 20, 2013 when the principal and other officials at Forestbrook Elementary School called police to the school to see if any laws had been broken by recent behavior of school personnel, according to a Horry County Police report.

The parents of a 5-year-old special needs child sent him to Forestbrook Elementary School with a hidden audio recording device and the audio was played for police and school officials.

During part of the recording the boy is “screaming to stop pinching him and calls [one suspect’s] name,” the police report said.

During the recording, the pair of school workers are heard: “a door can be heard shutting and the teacher and aide were talking and one of them said something about it being a good thing that there are not cameras in the room yet,” the police report said.

The recordings from the boy tend to indicate the boy was sent to an “office” which was actually a 5 foot square bathroom in the classroom for “being bad,” according to the police report.

On the recording, a person made the boy continuously repeat that he had been bad and that he would not do so again, according to the police report.

Rogers, who had previously chosen not to plead guilty in the case was scheduled to stand trial this week.  However, Rogers has instead pleaded guilty to the original charge of unlawful conduct toward a child and was sentenced to serve three years in prison, and must self report to authorities by September 18, according to Solicitor Monice Wooten.

Rogers also loses her teaching license and is now documented on the child abuse and neglect registry following her guilty plea Monday.

Police also charged, Linda Warriner, a teachers-aide at Forestbrook Elementary school.  She pleaded guilty in the same case and was sentenced to three years in jail in 2014.

Former School Bus Driver Guilty Of Child Sex Abuse

.jpg photo of man that molested 2 Children
John Carrell

WEST JORDAN, UTAH  –  A former school bus driver was found guilty on 19 felony counts related to child sex abuse.

The jury found John Carrell guilty on 19 of the 33 felony counts related to aggravated sex abuse of a child. He was found not guilty on 14 of the remaining felony counts. The 19 guilty verdicts covered both of his victims. The two girls were special needs children and rode on the bus Carrell drove for the Canyons School District.

The jury delivered the mixed verdict after 16 hours of deliberations.
In the courtroom, there was a quiet tension moments before the judge started reading each of the 33 counts.

Judge: “Count one, not guilty”There was a gasp in the courtroom after the first charge was read. Carrell’s eyes enlarged.

But then reality hit Carrell when count two was read by the judge. Judge: “Count two: guilty of aggravated sex abuse of a child.”

All it took was one guilty verdict and Carrell knew he would be going to prison for a long time.

When it was over, Carrell was found guilty on 19 of the 33 charges of aggravated sex abuse of a child.

Afterwards, the parents of one of the victims spoke briefly about the guilty verdicts.

“Closure, closure for us, a little closure,” said Thomas Brown, the parent who first heard his daughter speak of a problem on the school bus.

Brown’s wife was also present during the entire trial. And she was focusing on getting her child back to normal.

“We go home and we care for our kids,” Marisela Brown said. “That is our future. That is our life and that’s what they need. We want to care for her.”

When asked if her special needs daughter who is now six years old would understand the guilty verdict she said no.

As for John Carrell, he showed little emotion when the verdicts were read. He was taken into custody after the verdicts were read.
His family left the courtroom without comment but visibly shaken and weeping.

Carrell’s attorney said he accepted the verdict.

“We’re disappointed obviously and he’s disappointed,” said Ron Yengich. “But John accepts the verdict as well. That’s what we should do in a country that we believe in the jury system.”

Carrell will remain in the Salt Lake County jail until he’s sentenced on September 24. He faces a sentence of 15-year-to life in prison on each of the charges. The question remains whether the judge will offer him consecutive or concurrent sentences.

Cases spark calls for cameras in Special Education classes

The Bullying Program in the public school system didn’t work for one simple reason:  There is always at least one adult involved.

The Abuse of Special Needs Children have been the subject of several of Our posts.  This does not surprise me in the least,  I only wonder how many of Our Children have been sexually abused by these people.

Just for your information, I could care less about who doesn’t like me recording them, and I do not tell anyone.  I have been told many times how illegal this is, and then I tell why it is not illegal.  I do want to mention that with a certain command, my phone records, and it is quiet possible that someone is listening to the conversation and possibly watching the events Real Time….

KOKOMO, Ind. (AP) — A Kokomo couple is calling for cameras in special education classrooms following an investigation into injuries their autistic son suffered in school last year.

Leslie and Daniel Brannon and other parents of children with special needs say the cameras would allow school officials and investigators to see what happened if a child is injured at school.

But educators and advocates fear they would trample on the rights of teachers and other students.

Many schools place cameras in hallways and on school buses to help monitor students’ behavior. Parents aren’t allowed to view the footage because of the privacy rights of other students caught on camera.

School administrators tell the Kokomo Tribune http://bit.ly/1dJj9Sn that they already have procedures in place to handle any allegations of wrongdoing in the classroom.

NOPD: poor handling of sex crimes and child abuse complaints

Indifference to Child Abuse
Russell Johnson and son Rida

NOPD to cite officers who quickly closed child abuse complaint case

NEW ORLEANS – A child abuse complaint filed by Russell Johnson on behalf of his 6-year-old autistic son has been closed without arrests, but action is being taken against the New Orleans police officers who conducted the original investigation.

Rida Johnson, whose autistic condition renders him unable to speak, had a large bruise over his eye when his father picked him up from school one day last year.

Despite his disappointment, Russell Johnson was encouraged this week to see the New Orleans Police Department take action against the officers who failed to properly investigate his original call.

“I was very pleased and very happy to see that finally someone really took a look at the facts and the conduct of the people involved and did what was correct, did the right thing,” Johnson said.

Johnson received a letter from the police department stating that Officer Kimara Woods was found in violation of professionalism for her cursory investigation, taking less than 24 hours to basically close the case without further action.

In addition, Woods’ supervisors were cited because it took more than a day to respond to Johnson’s call to police. Now that PIB has found the officers in violation of departmental policy, the case will now go before a commanding officer to determine the penalties.

Woods’ attorney, Donovan Livaccari of the Fraternal Order of Police, said it would be premature to comment because Woods’ penalty has not been determined. He said the discipline could range from a reprimand to a 10-day suspension.

Johnson’s complaint came after a scathing audit revealed poor handling of hundreds of sex crimes and child abuse complaints. In shoring up the deficiencies, Police Chief Michael Harrison this week changed the commander of that unit.

Johnson said that when he originally called the NOPD last August to investigate what happened to his son, a troubling sequence of events left him wondering if he was getting the same lax treatment as the hundreds of other victims who received little or no investigation after reporting sexual assaults and child abuse over the past three years.

“The toughest part is anytime a parent has to go through something where they have a defenseless child that has something like that happen to him,” Johnson said. “To have someone do that type of physical harm to him. It sends you through a lot of emotions and a lot of despair.”

The school that Johnson attended, Capdau Charter, did not return calls for comment.

Girl helps paramedics through sign language

Girl helped Paramedics
Yesenia Diosdado accepting award from Paramedics

Ten-year-old Yesenia Diosdado is revising an English assignment. But it turns out the language that’s proven to be most valuable is the one she knows that’s silent. Yesenia’s mother started teaching her sign language when she was just a year old.

“I have always explained to my kids — even if you may never use it — the importance of sign language is everywhere,” her mother Susan Mulidore told CBS News.

A little over a week ago Yesenia found out her mother was right all along. She was playing outside with a friend in Lenexa, Kansas. “I heard a weird sound so I wanted to go look,” she told CBS News.

It turned out the sounds and commotion were a car accident. Yesenia saw the paramedics trying to talk to a woman who’d been hurt and was still in the car. She could see they were having trouble communicating. That was until the brave girl rushed in and started signing with her. “Are you hurt?” she asked the woman using her hands.

The woman told her that she was indeed injured, and with Yesenia’s help also instructed the paramedics which hospital she wished to be admitted to.

“We would not have even been able to establish what her injuries were without significant delays of having to establish another means of communication,” said Chris Winger, one of the paramedics who was present at the scene of the accident.

While it turns out the woman wasn’t seriously hurt, Yesenia did help ease the transfer to the hospital. In recognition of her heroic efforts, the paramedics presented her with a certificate and medal of appreciation. While Yesenia was surprised by all the attention, it’s now undeniable that learning sign language was well worth the effort.

“Just knowing the simple alphabet of sign language can be a huge benefit, especially in a situation like this,” said her mother.