Category Archives: Teaching Parents

Jacksonville NC Focusing On Preventing Child Abuse

.jpg photo of Jacksonville NC
“If you want to change the lives of children, you have to change the lives of the people who are taking care of them… “

Jacksonville council looking into Child Abuse task force

Jacksonville, NC  –  District Attorney Ernie Lee addressed the Jacksonville City Council and showcased the circumstances that contribute to child abuse and mistreatment.  Although it wasn’t listed in the slideshow reasons, Lee told the council, “Some people are mean. Some people are bad.”

Other contributing factors include a lack of intelligence and education as well as a cycle of abuse, marriage problems, unemployment and illness, among other reasons.

Some people just aren’t equipped to raise children, Lee continued, adding that it was amazing what someone has to go through to get a driver’s license, and yet anyone can have a child.

Lee said he currently has 32 people awaiting trial for more than 100 charges that include child abuse and exploitation of a child.

“We need to get in front of this.  We need to do something to prevent it from happening,” Jacksonville Director of Public Safety Mike Yaniero said.

Yaniero and Lee, along with several others with them at the council workshop, were there to promote the idea of a task force that focuses on preventing child abuse.

Malea Rose-Waters with Prevent Child Abuse N.C. said she’s worked with New Hanover, Cumberland, and Halifax counties to create child abuse prevention plans using community leaders with a passion for helping kids.

The focus of those task forces is finding ways to give adults the tools they need to overcome the stresses of life and become better parents in order to give their children happy and healthy homes, like learning how to create a nurturing relationship with your child, classes for parenting skills, how to build resilience, and learning to only allow positive relationships, instead of toxic ones, around your children.

“If you do want to change the lives of children, you have to change the lives of the people who are taking care of them, Rose-Waters explained.

These communities hope to offer ways for parents to ensure basic needs are met, and help them learn it’s okay to ask for help while also ensuring they know where to go to get the help they need.

“I think all of us would agree that a child being hurt is not okay, and it’s 100 percent preventable,” said Dawn Rochelle with Onslow County Partnership for Children.  “I believe that the resources are here.”

Jacksonville Mayor Sammy Phillips noted that the child abuse issue in Onslow County has just as much, if not more, of a devastating impact on the community as the opioid epidemic.

Council members agreed that it’s an issue that needs to be tackled and unanimously approved having the city staff look into a task force and partnerships between the city, the county, and the organizations and people represented at the meeting before reporting back with their findings within 90 days.

Memphis CAC Teaches About Child Abuse

.jpg photo of Memphis Child Advocate
Kris Crim with the Memphis Child Advocacy Center.

Child Abuse prevention: One in five children
sexually assaulted in Shelby County

SHELBY COUNTY, TN  –  There have been three child rape cases reported within days in Shelby County, and thousands within the past few months.

“90 percent of the time the abuser is someone that the child knows.  60 percent, it’s someone within the family’s circle,” said Kris Crim with the Memphis Child Advocacy Center.

Crim said many kids will keep the abuse a secret, because they feel confused or scared.

It’s why he’s been teaching adults about abuse through Stewards of Children program.

The course talks about what to look for.

“Often physical signs are not present.  Sometimes they are.  Often times they are not.  We have to be in tune with emotional behavior.  Things that may be happening like too perfect behavior or children acting out in certain ways,” he said.

Also, the program addresses conversations to have with children.

“Teaching children that no can be an appropriate response to adults if there’s an uncomfortable touch or something that makes them feel uncomfortable,” said Crim.

He said studies show one in five children in Shelby County are sexually abused by their 18th birthday.  That’s double the national average.

“We know that over 80 percent of sexual abuse occurs in isolated one-on-one situations,” he said.

Child advocates said predators may not have a prior record or be listed on a sex offender registry.

They can come off as warm and loving to the outside world.  It’s why they get away with the horrific acts.

It’s important to listen to your gut and talk to your child if something just doesn’t feel right.

If you suspect abuse, call the Tennessee Child Abuse hotline at 1-877-237-0004.  You can remain anonymous, and you don’t have to know all the facts.

If you don’t report abuse, you can face criminal charges in Mississippi and Tennessee.

For more information about the Stewards for Children program, check out the Child Advocacy Center’s open enrollment sessions:

  • March 7, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation office, 1900 Union Ave.
  • March 17, 9-11:30 a.m., Memphis Child Advocacy Center, 1085 Poplar Ave,
  • April 4, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation
  • April 21, 9-11:30 a.m., Memphis Child Advocacy Center
  • April 30, 1-3:30 p.m., Community Foundation

Pre-registration is required.  Contact Keita Cooley at 888-4362 or

Human Trafficking Awareness

.jpg photo of National Human Trafficking Hotline graphic

Latest trends in U.S. Child Sex Trafficking

Today we are excited to share our newest research.  Survivors have graciously allowed us to hear their stories, and in order for us all to be a part of the solution, we’re excited to share their stories with you.

Explore the Findings

Participants’ age of entry into the life

  • Youngest age of entry was less than 1-year-old
  • One in six were under the age of 12
  • Most frequently reported age is 15

Two themes in U.S. child sex trafficking emerged from this report:

  1. Technology is playing an increasing role in grooming and controlling victims of child sex trafficking.  75% of victims who entered the life in the past decade were advertised online.
  2. Less familiar forms of child trafficking, including those trafficked by family members or without a clear trafficker, are emerging.  80% of all victims under 10 were trafficked by a family member.

Without survivor input, our anti-trafficking movement risks wasting time and resources — and most importantly, endangering children.  We are truly grateful to all of the organizations and survivors that shared their stories and made this work possible.

Today is #HumanTraffickingAwarenessDay, and our research also showed that 2 out of 3 survivors never saw a help resource during their abuse.  You can change that by sharing the Human Trafficking hotline today everywhere you have a community on social media.

Spread The Word

“Survivor insights keep us grounded in the reality and complexity of their experience so that the best interventions can be developed to defend children from sexual abuse.”
Brooke Istook, Director of Strategy & Operations

Its A Bird, A Plane – The Reason Is You

.jpg photo of frozen pond where child was saved by Law Enforcement
“I couldn’t feel anything. I didn’t notice anything when I was doing it… I had to get that child out of the water.”

Deputy who rescued boy from pond says
he was desperate, numb

A Utah sheriff’s deputy said Tuesday he was desperate and numb from the cold as he punched and stomped his way into a frozen pond on Christmas Day to pull out an 8-year-old boy who had fallen through the ice while chasing his dog.

With cuts on his forearms, Washington County sheriff’s Sgt. Aaron Thompson said at a news conference that rescuers believe the child was in the 37-degree water for about 30 minutes until the deputy rescued him.

“I couldn’t feel anything.  I didn’t notice anything when I was doing it,” Thompson said.  “I knew that time was of the essence.  I had a very short window to get that child out of the water.”

Sheriff’s Lt. David Crouse said the boy was hospitalized in Salt Lake City but he didn’t have details on his condition.  Thompson said deputies were hopeful.

The boy fell through the ice in the town of New Harmony, north of St. George.

After arriving at the scene, Thompson, who had served on a search and rescue dive team, began searching an area where a woman reported seeing the boy’s hand flail about four minutes earlier.

The deputy stomped to break through the ice and work his way deeper, pounding with his hands and fists.

“As the ice got thicker, I couldn’t break it with my arms and my fists anymore, so I had to jump up on top of the ice, putting my weight on it, and then pound on it to get it to break,” he said.

When he went into the water, his toes brushed against reeds growing on the bottom of the pond and water reached his neck.
He swished his arms and legs around before finding the boy beneath the ice about 25 feet from the shoreline.

Thompson was treated for symptoms of hypothermia and released from a hospital Monday night.  He said he lost the feeling in some fingers but sensation had returned by Tuesday.

He expects to return to work by early next week.

The Spectrum of St. George reported that Sheriff Cory Pulsipher praised the deputy.

“He hates having the spotlight on him, but he’s a hero,” Pulsipher said.

Vehicles Flooded In Hurricane Could Contain Toxic Waste

.jpg photo of vehicles flooded in Hurricane Harvey
13 Superfund Sites were flooded during Hurricane Harvey.

AG Paxton Issues Consumer Alert: Beware of Buying Flood-Damaged Vehicles in Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

AUSTIN, TX  –  Attorney General Ken Paxton today is advising any Texan considering a used car purchase to be wary of vehicles for sale that might have suffered flood damage from Hurricane Harvey.

It’s estimated that between 500,000 and one million automobiles were submerged in floodwaters during the unprecedented disaster.

In Texas, a seller is required by law to tell prospective buyers about damage to a vehicle.  If the damage is from flooding, the words “Flood Damage” must be included on the vehicle’s title.  Failure to disclose that information may be a violation of the state’s Deceptive Trade Practices Act.

“While most Texas businesses and individuals are law-abiding, there are always those looking to take advantage of consumers by selling them flood-damaged vehicles in the months following a hurricane,” Attorney General Paxton said.  “A cleaned-up vehicle could be a ticking time bomb with unseen damage, posing mechanical and safety risks to the buyer.

If you suspect fraud, report it to the Consumer Protection Division of my office at 1-800-621-0508.  We will aggressively investigate and prosecute cases.”

Attorney General Paxton and his Consumer Protection Division offer Texans the following tips to protect against buying flood-damaged vehicles:

Look for tell-tale signs of flooding.  The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles offers a checklist at

Have the vehicle inspected by an independent, competent automotive technician who has no relation to the seller.  Since flood damage is hard to spot, paying an expert mechanic for an inspection provides peace of mind.

Check the vehicle history with a private service that can research insurance claims.  Visit the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System for its list of approved providers at

Always review the vehicle’s paper title before you buy.  Check to see if it has been “branded” as salvaged or damaged.

Report suspected fraud to the attorney general’s Consumer Protection Division by calling toll-free 1-800-621-0508 or by filing an online complaint at