Category Archives: Teaching Parents

TX Doctor Believes In This System

.jpg photo of Chaplin for Child Advocate
Melissa Zenteno, a chaplain at One Safe Place.

Texas doctor seeks to stop Child Abuse
before it can happen

FORT WORTH, TX  –  A Texas doctor believes a modeling system that’s successfully identified neighborhoods, streets and even specific businesses where shootings and other crimes are likely to occur can help stop child abuse and neglect before it happens.

Dyann Daley started a nonprofit this summer to help communities create maps that can zero in on areas as small as a few city blocks where such maltreatment is likeliest to happen, helping prevent it and allowing advocacy groups to better target their limited resources.

“This approach is really focused on prevention,” said Daley, a pediatric anesthesiologist.  “Because if you know where something is going to happen, then you can do something to stop it.”

Unlike the common hot spot mapping approach, which identifies high-frequency areas of child abuse and neglect based on cases that have already happened, Daley’s risk terrain modeling approach identifies other factors that indicate an area is fertile ground for abuse so that efforts can be made to head it off.  Such prevention not only can save lives, but also can help at-risk children avoid the often lifelong harmful effects of maltreatment, including a likelihood of alcohol and drug abuse, depression and anxiety, and higher risk of aggressive or criminal behavior.

“Hot spots tell you where past crimes have occurred but don’t explain why,” said Joel Caplan, one of two Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice professors who created risk terrain modeling. Caplan said mapping of hot spots assumes that crimes will continue to occur in the same location.

Risk terrain modeling was initially used to understand why shootings were happening repeatedly at certain locations.  Caplan said that such modeling has since been used in a variety of areas, including traffic planning and suicides, but that Daley’s work is the first he knows of applying it to maltreatment of children.

The modeling has helped police departments across the country identify areas to target and strategies to use to reduce certain crimes.

Caplan said a project in Atlantic City, N.J., found laundromats, convenience stores and vacant properties were high-risk locations for shootings and robberies.  Interventions this year included police regularly checking in at the convenience stores and city officials prioritizing efforts to clean up vacant lots and board up vacant properties near those convenience stores and laundromats.  He said results for the first five months show a 20 percent reduction in violent crimes.

“It gives us an idea of which risk factors we should focus on if we want to make the biggest impact, and that’s something you can’t do with hot spot mapping,” Daley said.

Daley adapted the modeling for Fort Worth as executive director of the Cook Children’s Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment, a post she left in May before starting her nonprofit, Predict-Align-Prevent Inc.

After using the model to analyze 10 known risk factors for child abuse and neglect, she found the most predictive risk factors for child maltreatment in Fort Worth were incidents of domestic violence, runaways, aggravated assaults and sexual assaults.

Perhaps surprisingly, when poverty was removed as a factor, the model’s predictive accuracy improved, said Daley.  She added that the most influential risk factors might change depending on the city, especially for rural versus urban areas.

The next step is determining what prevention strategies work. Daley said success will be measured by reductions in child abuse and highly correlative risk factors including violent crime, domestic violence and teen pregnancy.

Officials at the Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment will spend the coming months coordinating a plan for specific interventions in Fort Worth.

“We’ve got the maps, and we think we know where the risks are increased in our specific community.  The big question that has to be answered is: What are you going to do about it?” said Larry Tubb, senior vice president of the unit that oversees the center.  He said strategies could include neighborhood watch groups and early childhood development centers.

David Sanders, an executive vice president at Casey Family Programs, called Daley’s work “incredibly promising” and said it now needs to be paired with research on what interventions work.

“There are a couple of interventions that seem to impact communities, but we just don’t have enough,” he said.

Daley distributed the mapping information to a variety of Fort Worth groups, noting that the prevalence of churches made them a good starting point for prevention efforts.

At the Tarrant Baptist Association, leadership director Becky Biser inserted pins into a map on the wall to mark churches of all denominations in high risk areas, helping assess what churches are doing and what more can be done.

“For me, a picture says a lot. … It’s in a lot of people’s neighborhoods,” Biser said.

Melissa Zenteno, chaplain at One Safe Place, which helps victims of domestic violence, has been talking to pastors about her organization’s services.

Some experts have concerns about the mapping approach, especially regarding interventions.

Neil Guterman, director of the violence prevention program at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, said he fears that the mapping could lead to disproportionally intervening in marginalized communities in coercive ways.  He said he could see its merits, though, if it’s used the right way.

“If the tool is married with supportive strategies that we know can actually help and make a difference, then that would be very helpful,” he said

NC Dad Left 3 Children In Hot Baby Sitter

.jpg photo of man charged with leaving children in hot vehicle
Brandon Lee Lewis, 34

Yadkin County dad charged with Child Abuse after leaving 3 kids in hot car while in court

YADKINVILLE, NC  –  A man was arrested after police say he left three children inside a hot car while he was in court, according to a news release from Yadkinville police.

Brandon Lee Lewis, 34, of Hamptonville, is charged with three counts of misdemeanor child abuse.

On July 14, Yadkin County deputies at the courthouse were approached by a child who said he was waiting for his dad in the car and it was too hot.

A deputy accompanied the child back to the car and found two other children in the vehicle soaked in sweat.

Lewis was located in the courthouse in a traffic courtroom.  He told Yadkinville police that his air conditioner was working earlier that morning.

Yadkinville police took Lewis into custody and he was placed under a $1,500 secured bond.

The children, ages 10, 9 and 3, did not need medical attention.

Yadkin County deputies gave the children some water and a cool place to wait in the courthouse until their mom could come pick them up.

Media AntiChild Agenda – Child Porn Or Attempted Child Porn????

.jpg photo of man taking pictures of women and children in dressing room
Ian Kendrick Gregory

Chesterfield, Henrico police investigating cases of illicit photos of Target shoppers

HENRICO, VA  –  Shoppers are on alert after two men are accused of taking illicit photos or video at Central Virginia Target stores.

In the latest case, Ian Kendrick Gregory is facing charges because police say he tried to take videos of shoppers in the dressing room. Police say it happened at the Target store at Libbie Place Shopping Center on West Broad Street in Henrico.

Most shoppers we spoke to say they usually aren’t super cautious going into the dressing room.

“I actually don’t think about it, to be honest with you,” said Abby Owens.

“I’ve never had any issues or anything like that, but I mean, I’ve never been cautious,” said Ashleigh Peatross.

That opinion is changing because police say Gregory was just arrested for trying to record two people in the dressing room.

Investigators say one of the victims was underage.  Police say a woman was in one of the changing rooms when she looked down and saw a camera underneath the door. She decided to confront the man behind the camera, who police later identified as Gregory.

Police tracked down Gregory and arrested him.  They say that a second victim was also identified in the crime.

Gregory is not the only person who is accused of taking illicit photos. Chesterfield police continue to look for another man they say tried to take video up a shopper’s skirt .  It happened June 17 at the Target store at Westchester Commons.

Shoppers are hoping the managers at the retail giant will take action and have an employee stay outside the dressing rooms.

“They’re usually not even there, so you just walk in and change,” said Peatross.  “So if someone was always there, yeah, it would be a lot better and a lot of safer.”

Gregory is charged with unlawful filming of an undressed person and unlawful filming of an undressed minor.

Your Child Needs You – Pt 3

.jpg photo of Child Abuse graphic
Your Child Needs YOU
BEFORE It Is Too Late

The Bathroom Bill: The AntiChild Agenda

You and the other part of The Team have the chance to be the parents your Child deserves, although the chances of that happening are very slim.

Do you realize that the planet we inhabit defies the odds of an “accidental” anything making this earth.

When you add the odds of every creature of the sea, air, and land being totally unique(every one of every class of every living thing is different slightly than every other one), nothing other than Our Mighty GOD could have made all we know and set it in motion.

I want to say this quickly in passing: Greenhouse gas, fossil fuel pollution, pollution from coal power generation?  When you have a “one of a kind water purification system that also purifies the air”, is there any reason to worry about any of the above in this paragraph?

If you say yes, then write me a 20,000+ word thesis: Define the categories of volcanoes, list every element and gas known to man that is expelled from the volcano.  Now list the approximate amount of every poison that is blown into the air and atmosphere from a super volcano.  LIST NO THEORY!!!!

NOW, how is the sun still visible after 7,000+ years at the very least.

All the above is great information to talk about during quality time with The Team, if you run short of project material.

Good memories are easily made during Quality Time, and the opportunity to communicate with The Team is always there.

Can you communicate with The Team?  Is there meaningful communication between all Team members?  We have resources to help everyone’s Team, but you have got to have the desire to be the Parent your Child needs, then you have got to invest time in your Child and their future.

THE ANTI-CHILD AGENDA

It is a Parent’s duty to protect their Child until grown.  What should be very obvious is the fact that few people care for the well-being of Children.

The first of 2015, we met Alan Fountain through his attempt to get a window opened in Georgia’s SOL for Sexually Abused Children, so we pitched in to assist Alan any way possible.  This was a very learning experience, but the one thing that I could never have imagined was the first time I read that Atlanta GA was the Child Sex Trafficking Capitol of Our Country.

As of Monday, May 22, 2017, according to the latest numbers I read, Atlanta GA is still the Child Sex Trafficking Capitol of Our Country.

There is NO TRANSGENDER, there is ONLY a psychological disorder called “GENDER DYSPHORIA”.

I could never have imagined the day when the AntiChild Agenda would make it impossible to raise your Child as was intended, it is wrong to implant indifference into a Child’s heart.

YES, I SAID “AS WAS INTENDED”, if you look back into the 3rd paragraph of this post, where I was talking about every living thing being unique unto itself (all GoldFish are marked slightly different, as are Leopards, and as are Mockingbirds), but in the same respect every living thing has one thing in common, there is not one type of living thing that is homosexual.  Human’s are the only creature perverse enough to act on sick fantasies and evil whims, just as they are the only living creature that derives pleasure from watching or causing another human pain and suffering.

PULLING NO PUNCHES

Lt. Governor Dan Patrick Cares For Children And Families

What should be all too obvious at this point in time, is that there has always been an AntiChild Agenda, since Children have never been protected.

Texas bathroom bill could expose birth certificate gender of transgender kids

Amarillo Group Has Answers Others Could Use

.jpg photo of Child Abuse Advocates
The panel specifically discussed how preventative measures can steer families away from abuse, neglect and the inevitable involvement of Child Protective Services.

Panel in Amarillo says answers to Child Abuse must be community-driven

AMARILLO, TX  –  Child abuse and neglect is 60 percent higher in Amarillo than the state average.

Kristie Tingle, a research analyst with the Center for Public Policy Priorities, revealed the number Tuesday during a presentation that painted a picture for community leaders, municipal candidates, professionals with Child Protective Services and representatives from Amarillo’s non-profit sector about the current state of Texas Panhandle families.

Tingle said the difference in Amarillo’s high percentage as compared to the state’s average might be attributed to increased reporting of abuse and neglect cases.

However, she and Sasha Rasco, the associate commissioner for the Texas Department of Family &Protective Services Division of Prevention & Early Intervention, also suspect there’s another significant contributing factor:  Amarillo’s high rate of domestic violence.

“We know that violence is violence,” Rasco said.  “Violence in the home generally impacts both the adults and the children, so it’s easy to conclude there’s something about violence that needs to be tackled in the panhandle area.  Not that we don’t see domestic violence or physical abuse around the entire state, but it does seem to be concentrated here.”

The forum was sponsored by PEI and featured a panel of professionals including Bruce Moseley, executive director for the Turn Center in Amarillo, Dubb Alexander, founder and director of Fathers Add Value in Amarillo, and April Leming, executive director for the Bridge Children’s Advocacy Center.

The panel specifically discussed how preventative measures can steer families away from abuse, neglect and the inevitable involvement of Child Protective Services.  They also talked about how to support children with developmental needs, how to empower fathers and the various ways that families deal with stress.

Rasco said PEI serves about 62,000 families in Texas through their prevention programming.  According to a recent study by the Texas Institute for Child & Family Wellbeing at The University of Texas at Austin, 97 percent of those Texas families did not experience CPS involvement.

Shawn Vandygriff, CPS Region 1 director, said the study’s outcome shows that prevention measures actually work.

“What we currently have is great, but how much greater that could be and how many more people we can touch if we have more prevention type of resources in each of our communities?” Vandygriff asked.  “Because obviously, that data shows that if parents can get the help they need in order to remain stress free — or to provide a food box or whatever the situation might be — that we (CPS) don’t become involved with them.  If they have the ability to reach out on their own to get what they need, then it does alleviate some of the caseload we (CPS) would end up getting.”

Using the analogy of a river, Rasco described the flow of child welfare in Texas.

Most recently the focus has been shifted solely to saving children who might be drowning in the river — foster care — but Rasco believes attention should be given equally to children and families who are upstream, who might later find themselves in that situation.

“There’s generally, on any given day, around 36,000 children in foster care – but there’s 7 million in the state of Texas,” Rasco said.

Tingle shared with the panel many of the descriptive statistics she’s gathered about families in the Texas Panhandle.  She said she’s concluded that the region has “concerning trends” that negatively compare to those in larger metropolitan areas across the state.

“Dallas had only four more domestic violence homicides than Amarillo did, but Dallas has six times the population,” Tingle said, referring to research from 2015.

“It’s not existing in a vacuum,” said Tingle.  “The high rates of family violence are feeding back into the high rates of child abuse as well.”

Tingle added that the research conducted on area families also includes changes in the region’s demographics, specifically changes in population by race along with an increasing Hispanic population.

Courtney Seals, division administrator for DFPS Division of Community and System Support, said these are community-based concerns and therefore the answers must be community-driven.

There is a role for everybody,” Seals said.  “This is not just an issue for social workers in Amarillo, this is not just an issue for people at the schools, this is something that every single person has the ability to influence in some way, whether it’s within your own company by creating a space that supports families and allows families the time off they need to go to doctor visits with their kids, or whether you’re educating people in the community about this issue.  But everybody can do something.”

Rasco echoed Seals, encouraging the creation of a culture that embraces families, even when a two-year-old might be throwing a temper tantrum at a grocery store.  The usual response to that situation might be to frown at the mother, Rasco said, but an encouraging word or understanding smile instead can become a catalyst of positive change.

“Imagine how differently that mom goes home with that kid,” Rasco said.  “There really are micro things you can change in a community to make it a happier, healthier place to raise children.  That’s not about the social work, that’s not about CPS, that’s about the community deciding how they want to embrace children and families and help parents.”

Child Abuse and Neglect in the Texas Panhandle

  • 15.5 out of every 1,000 children in Amarillo
  • 9.1 out of every 1,000 children in the state of Texas
  • This is a 60 percent difference in confirmed child abuse and neglect cases in Amarillo compared to Texas state average

Factors Affecting Child Abuse and Neglect in the Texas Panhandle

  • The average family of three needs $48,000/year to survive in Amarillo
  • 29 percent of Amarillo jobs cannot provide that annual salary
  • Potter and Randall counties combined had more than 26,000 domestic violence cases in 2015
  • Potter County violence against women is 6.8 per 1,000 women per year which is three times higher than the statewide rate
  • In Amarillo, there were 7 homicides committed by a family member or partner in 2015 as compared to Dallas, with six times the population, which had 11 homicides that same year