Category Archives: SexuallyViolentPredator

Museum Worker Stops 2-Year-Olds Abduction

Good Samaritan
Sharon Wise stopped Childs Abduction

Woman Stops Abduction of Young Girl

An employee at the Maine State Museum said her instincts kicked in when she saw an alleged attempted abduction.

Sharon Wise, 65, was at the museum reception desk on Tuesday when she saw a man run over to a 2-year-old girl and start to pull her by her wrist, according to ABC News affiliate WMTW-TV in Augusta, Maine. Wise said it all happened while the little girl’s grandmother was hanging up their coats.

“He grabbed a hold of the little girl and grabbed a hold of her wrist and he starts pulling her,” Wise told WMTW-TV. “At that point, instinctively I bent over and hovered over the child. I kept saying in a very low voice, leave her alone.”

Wise said the man did not leave the girl alone but instead kept pulling her. That’s when Wise, acting on instinct, managed to get between the man and the young girl, according to WMTW-TV. “I looked him right in the eye and I was really close to him and I said, ‘Let go of her now,’ and he waited for a minute, looked me right in the eye and he dropped her hand and left,” she said.

Minutes after he left, the man identified as James Cavallaro was arrested by police in the museum parking lot. “When he grabbed her, she [Wise] went right over and told him to let go and wouldn’t take no for an answer,” Chief Russell Gauvin of the Bureau of Capitol Police told The Associated Press. Cavallaro was charged with assault and held at the Kennebec County Jail.

Drummer Molests 3-year-old

Pedophile
Peter Ivan McNeal

Former Cake Drummer Peter McNeal Sentenced to Prison for Child Molestation

Former Cake drummer Peter Ivan McNeal, 48, has been sentenced to prison after being found guilty of molesting a three-year-old girl. The incident, which occurred at a 2009 Thanksgiving celebration where McNeal was a guest, has landed the drummer 15 years to life behind bars.

This is not the first time McNeal has faced legal action for a sexual offense. In 2012, the former Cake member was charged with child sex abuse and released on $250,000 bail after attempting to molest a six-year-old girl while volunteering at a Los Angeles school. McNeal was given three years probation. The incident took place only two weeks after the Thanksgiving molestation.

McNeal’s first child molestation trial concerning the three-year-old victim was declared a mistrial, but during the drummer’s retrial, he was found guilty of one felony count of oral copulation and sexual penetration with the three-year-old back in 2013. Along with his prison time, McNeal will be listed as a sex offender for the rest of his life.

Peter McNeal performed with Cake from 2001-2004, though he did not appear on any of the band’s studio albums. Cake is best known for their ’90s alt-rock hits ‘The Distance’ and ‘Never There.’

It’s one of THEM times

Stanton Dreymala
Stanton Dreymala

Notorious Houston serial killer up for parole

A mother and father from Pasadena drove to an office building in Angleton Thursday for a closed-door parole hearing on one of Houston’s most notorious killers.

Their son, a 13 year-old boy named Stanton Dreymala, may not be remembered by many people in the Houston area, but what happened to him is seared in the collective memory of a generation of Houstonians. He was one of at least 28 boys and young men lured to a horrifying death in what became known as the Houston mass murders. “He was just a normal 13 year-old,” said his mother, Elaine Dreymala. “He went to school, he rode his bike, he mowed lawns for his spending money.”

Between 1971 and 1973, a man named Dean Corrl recruited two teenaged accomplices – David Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley – to entice other youngsters to his homes, where they were drugged, raped and sexually tortured – sometimes for days – before they were murdered. Some of the terrified victims were forced to write notes telling their mothers they were leaving town shortly before they were killed.

The boys’ disappearances were mostly dismissed as cases of runaways until one day in August 1973, when Corrl tried to kill Henley and Henley somehow managed to shoot Corrl dead. Henley and Brooks then led law enforcement authorities on a gruesome search for the buried corpses of their victims. Both of the surviving killers were sentenced to life in prison.

Since then, both of them have occasionally come up for parole. And although there seems little chance either of the notorious serial killers would be freed by a Texas parole board, the hearings tear at the psychological wounds imposed on the victims’ families and friends. “We can’t hardly bear to go through this, since there’s two of them,” said Eliane Dreymala. “That’s about every year and a half for us.”

Henley has attracted more media attention than Brooks since their incarceration. An art gallery in Houston’s Montrose area once hosted an exhibit of his paintings, which he has offered for sale. And a few years ago, he allowed himself to be interviewed and photographed by an author.

But some of the victim’s families believe Brooks is more culpable in the killings than Henley. “Brooks, of course, recruited Henley,” said Andy Kahan, the City of Houston’s crime victim advocate. “And essentially, he marched 28 young boys to their deaths knowing full well the sadistic type of torture they would receive before they were brutally killed.”

The headlines in newspapers saved by the victims’ families have faded, but their determination to keep the killers behind bars has not. Every couple of years, one of the two murderers comes up for parole. And loved ones of the victims mount campaigns to keep them in prison.

The Dreymala’s appearance before a parole board in Angleton Thursday was especially poignant. They are now the last surviving parents to have lost a child in the Houston mass murders. “And when we have to go through it, it brings back all the memories, all the horror,” said Elaine Dreymala, Stanton’s mother. “And it’s just not right. We feel victimized every time we have to do it.”

Of course, nobody’s forcing them to appear before the parole board. But even though a parole for such notorious killers seems unlikely, the Dreymala’s think their appearances are important. “Every time we come up here, we think it’s possible,” James Dreymala said. “Not probable. But we would feel really, really stupid if he was paroled and we weren’t here to fight it.”

That’s why they plan to join other victim rights advocates lobbying Texas legislators for a change in state law that would allow officials to wait five years between parole hearings for killers like Henley and Brooks. Right now, Kahan said, there’s a disparity in the law decreeing that convicts guilty of lesser crimes can wait five years between hearings, but some of the state’s most heinous murderers are eligible every three years.

However often the parole board holds its hearings, the Dreymalas plan to return every time. “There is no earthly reason why they should ever be paroled,” Elaine Dreymala said. “And we’ll fight it as long as we are alive.”

Sexually Violent Predator and Pedophile

2014-11-12-Gary_Snavely-VSP-1State again proposes placing Child Predator in San Diego County

Posted: Nov 12, 2014 8:38 PM CST Updated: Nov 12, 2014 8:38 PM CST
SAN DIEGO (CNS) – The Department of State Hospitals Wednesday proposed housing sexually violent predator and pedophile Gary Snavely in Jacumba Hot Springs.

In August, a judge determined that Snavely, 51, could be safely released in San Diego County as long as he continued to get treatment. Public comment related to his release from prison will be accepted at a Dec. 19 court hearing. Last month, officials proposed placing Snavely in Borrego Springs, but that plan was withdrawn.

Snavely was convicted in 1987 of molesting two Orange County girls younger than 10 and served three years in prison. He was released, but violated his parole and was returned to prison.
In 1996 while living in San Diego after his release, Snavely was convicted of failing to register as a sex offender and was sentenced to 16 months behind bars.

Prior to his release from prison, the District Attorney’s Office filed a petition to civilly commit Snavely as a sexually violent predator. In 1998, Snavely was found to be an SVP and was ordered to undergo treatment at a state mental hospital.

 In 2008, the court granted Snavely’s request for conditional release, but he was returned to the hospital several months later for medication misuse.

In April, Snavely filed a petition for conditional release, which Judge Louis Hanoian granted after hearing testimony from two mental health experts and reviewing reports from other experts.

Members of the public can comment on Snavely’s proposed placement in Jacumba Hot Springs by going to the court hearing on Dec. 19 or do the following by Nov. 21:

— email to sdsafesheriff.org;

— call (858) 495-3619; or

— send mail to SVP Release/SAFE Task Force, 9425 Chesapeake Drive, San Diego, CA, 92123.