Tag Archives: Bullyed

SEX OFFENDERS MORE IMPORTANT THAN VETERANS????

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Our Veterans are Heroes!!!!

How can Sex Offenders be given presidence over Our Veterans????

How can Sex Offenders be Security Guards at any Veterans Facility, much less mistreat Our Veterans and even manufacture evidence that is used against Our Veterans????

The New England Center For Homeless Veterans is NOT TAKING CARE OF OUR VETERANS!!!!

“Many, many veterans who really need help do not go there because the conditions are so bad.”

“Unsafe, unsanitary conditions found at New England Center for Homeless Veterans”

The place is infested with bedbugs, there are also roaches in the kitchen, rats in the basement, and mice.

Also, 32 men who live or work at the veterans shelter are registered sex offenders, most of them Level 3s, who are considered the most likely to re-offend.

Local Nonprofit Making Impact Statewide FL

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Monique Burr Foundation for Children Inc

Jacksonville, FL  –  A local program is making a huge impact statewide.

  • It teaches a half-million Florida schoolchildren how to protect themselves and their friends from being victims of child abuse, sexual abuse and bullying.
  • It produces solid, research-driven evidence that leads to pupils coming forward with reports of abuse, abusers being identified for victimizing children and kids being put in safer environments.
  • It is so easily implemented that counselors in hundreds of Florida schools have been effortlessly instructed on how to teach the lesson plan to pupils — and in an efficient, age-appropriate manner that doesn’t require huge chunks of classroom time and leaves staffers raving about its effectiveness.
  • It is provided free of charge to any school in any Florida district that requests it.

In the Duval County public schools alone, this prevention education is being provided to every pupil in kindergarten to sixth grade as well as kids in all but 12 of Florida’s 67 counties.

COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH

This impressive work is ably carried out in inspiring fashion by the Monique Burr Foundation, a local nonprofit whose Child Safety Matters program is winning national acclaim for its revolutionary approach to educating children to avoid being victimized by abuse — and, equally important, empowering those who have been abused to report it and prevent it from ever happening again.

“(Child Safety Matters) is comprehensive in approach and scope, and it saves lives,” said Ed Burr, the Jacksonville businessman who launched the Monique Burr Foundation nearly 20 years to honor his late wife, a devoted child advocate.

“When you can break the cycle of abuse,” Burr told the Times-Union editorial board, “you can change the lives not only of those kids but the generations that (follow them).”

The Child Safety Matters program has been extremely effective because it acknowledges the factor of polyvictimization — that children who are being sexually abused are usually being traumatized in other ways, too (bullying, violence, etc.) — and the reality that most kids are being victimized by adults and others they know or believed they could trust.

By using such a holistic and wide-ranging method to address abuse with pupils while in a classroom setting, Child Safety Matters has encouraged children to not only recognize when they are becoming targets of abuse, but to identify people they can immediately speak with and share what’s happening.

Among the strong partners are the Florida Department of Education, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, the Florida Department of Children and Families, Gov. Rick Scott’s office, the National Educators to Stop Trafficking and the Cyberbullying Research Center.

HIGH MARKS IN EVALUATIONS

Recently, the Child Safety Matters program was the subject of a rigorous, several-month evaluation by Florida State University’s respected School of Teacher Evaluation and received high marks not merely for how it empowered children to learn about preventing abuse, but for how easy it was set up for school counselors teaching it to carry out the standardized lesson plan.

In short, Child Safety Matters is helping children.

It is putting an end to ongoing abuse.

And it is preventing future abuse.

The program is doing so well — and at no cost to the school districts around this state that use it — that the question isn’t whether it works.

The only question is this:

Why are there still 12 counties in Florida that don’t think it’s worth having Child Safety Matters taught to their schoolchildren?

THE WHIP

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Bullying is wrong, and never forgotten.

THE WHIP

Strange how so long ago is so easily forgotten….

Every television station reporting the unprovoked attack,

The Money-Biased Media performing with each crack of Money’s whip,

Not Fracking Today!!!!

BUT RACISM REARING IT’s UGLY HEAD!!!!

Obama telling of the evil guns,

The Stupid Lemmings follow along and take up the chant,

STOP RACISM AND THE EVIL GUNS!!!!

No one with guts to tell the story,

But not this day….

For the story was told,

OF EACH BULLYING INJUSTICE,

As the gun tracked toward another,

Their cries for forgiveness too late,

YEARS TOO LATE,

FOR ALL THE TEARS,

CAUSED BY THE EVIL IN THEIR HEARTS,

AND THE EVIL IN THEIR WORDS,

SO LONG AGO.

But the evil media,

Didn’t record the last dying words,

For the script was already written,

By the MONEY THAT HOLDs THE WHIP.

Cases spark calls for cameras in Special Education classes

The Bullying Program in the public school system didn’t work for one simple reason:  There is always at least one adult involved.

The Abuse of Special Needs Children have been the subject of several of Our posts.  This does not surprise me in the least,  I only wonder how many of Our Children have been sexually abused by these people.

Just for your information, I could care less about who doesn’t like me recording them, and I do not tell anyone.  I have been told many times how illegal this is, and then I tell why it is not illegal.  I do want to mention that with a certain command, my phone records, and it is quiet possible that someone is listening to the conversation and possibly watching the events Real Time….

KOKOMO, Ind. (AP) — A Kokomo couple is calling for cameras in special education classrooms following an investigation into injuries their autistic son suffered in school last year.

Leslie and Daniel Brannon and other parents of children with special needs say the cameras would allow school officials and investigators to see what happened if a child is injured at school.

But educators and advocates fear they would trample on the rights of teachers and other students.

Many schools place cameras in hallways and on school buses to help monitor students’ behavior. Parents aren’t allowed to view the footage because of the privacy rights of other students caught on camera.

School administrators tell the Kokomo Tribune http://bit.ly/1dJj9Sn that they already have procedures in place to handle any allegations of wrongdoing in the classroom.

Bullying May Be Worse For Mental Health Than Child Abuse

Children who are bullied by their peers may be more likely to suffer mental health problems later in life than kids who are abused by adults, a study suggests.

Previous research has linked physical, emotional and sexual abuse during childhood to psychological difficulties later in life. Bullying too can have severe, long-lasting psychological and physical effects.

For the new study, researchers looked for associations between maltreatment, being bullied, and long-term mental health problems.

In particular, they say, they wanted to know whether mental health problems in kids exposed to those kinds of experiences are due to both maltreatment and bullying or whether bullying has a unique effect.

“We found, somewhat surprisingly, that those who were bullied and maltreated were not at higher risk than those just bullied,” senior study author Dieter Wolke, a psychology professor at the University of Warwick in the UK, said by email.

The data came from two large studies that tracked mental health in children and then followed them at least until at least age 18. One study, from the US, included more than 1,200 participants. The other, from the UK, involved more than 4,000.

Both studies relied on a combination of interviews with parents to track abuse in younger children as well as reports of bullying by older children.

As young adults, 19 per cent in the UK group and 18 per cent in the US group had mental health issues such as depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.

After adjusting for other family factors that might contribute to psychological problems, the researchers found an increased risk of depression among abused children in the US group but not in the UK group.

In both groups, however, mental health problems were significantly more likely in children who were bullied by their peers than in kids who were abused.

It’s possible that abuse was underreported by parents questioned about treatment of their children, the researchers note in the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry and presented today at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

The study also didn’t explore the severity of abuse or the age at which it began.

Even so, the findings highlight the need for parents, educators and clinicians to pay closer attention to bullying, Wolke said.

“It is particularly novel that they found bullying is a greater source of mental health problems than maltreatment,” said Catherine Bradshaw, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence in Baltimore.

Given this emerging connection, parents whose children encounter behaviour problems at school should be sure to follow-up to make sure bullying isn’t a factor, said Bradshaw, who wasn’t involved in the study.

At the same time, schools officials who discover bullying should explore whether there might be problems at home.

Teaching good communication and conflict resolution skills before kids reach school age is also important for prevention, she said. Later on, schools should reenforce these skills by creating a strong sense of community and fostering an environment where students feel connected to one another as well as to teachers and other adults.

“Schools often become the outlets where bullying comes to a head,” Bradshaw said. “Creating a sense of belonging has been consistently shown to be a protective factor as have programs that improve the school climate.”