Tag Archives: Children

Normal Children Have No Rights In America

.jpg photo of Pedophile flag
This is the flag that Pedophiles have adopted for themselves, all the while attempting to leverage freedom to molest Children under the guise of MAPs.

Pedophiles Desperately Trying To Join
LGBT Movement with Their Own
‘Acceptance’ Flag

IT IS WRONG TO IMPLANT INDIFFERENCE IN A CHILD’S HEART!!!!
We, the American People, who believe there is a basic set of values necessary to be a good parent, a good family member, a good neighbor, a good, productive member of the community, and a good citizen of this Country, have allowed our Justice system and elected officials to circumvent the Laws of our Country and guaranteed rights of We The People and all of our Children, all the while ignoring duly licensed Medical Doctors, in favor of Psychologists theories and generalizations in their pushing their #Perverse #AntiChildAgenda over the rights of We The People and all the Children   of America.
Robert StrongBow

Pedophiles have renamed themselves as “Minor Attracted Persons” in order to try and get acceptance and inclusion into the LGBT community.

The Daily Caller reported that Urban Dictionary defines Minor Attracted Personsalso known as MAPs — as a blanket term that includes infantophiles (a person attracted to infants), pedophiles (a person attracted to prepubescent children), hebephiles (a person attracted to pubescent children) and ephebophiles (a person attracted to post-pubescent children).

There are also NOMAPs or “Non-Offending Minor Attracted Persons” who reportedly don’t act on their attractions.  “Just because someone is attracted to a child does not mean they are automatically going to sexually abuse them,” The Prevention Project said.

They’re using this new term in order to distance themselves from the toxicity of the connotation of the word “pedophile” and become a part of the LGBT community.

The MAP community claims that pedophiles are “misunderstood, marginalized people,” much like the LGBT community, according to The Daily Caller.  They even created a flag for Gay Pride Month.

PSA TO MINORS:  IF YOU SEE THIS “””PRIDE””” FLAG ANYWHERE BE WARNED
this flag is for MAPs, which stands for minor attracted person(s)
THIS IS A FLAG FOR PEDOPHILES pic.twitter.com/agx2ryySqx
— Fish! 🐠 (@COMMUNIST_FISH) June 28, 2018

Websites like The Prevention Project say that “Everyone (Including Minor Attracted Persons or MAPs) Deserves Support” and provide stories that are meant to pull on heartstrings.

For example, they told the story of “John,” who “is not a child molester nor is he a sex offender.  He has an attraction to children.” “John” was suicidal and bullied, but his therapist said he wouldn’t treat “sex offenders” after “John” told him about his attraction.

The Prevention Project insists that “John” deserves support too because “having an attraction is not the issue; acting on one’s attraction is.”

There are Tumblr blogs that provide support for people of the MAPs community in order to create “safe spaces” for them, The Daily Caller reported.

This is not the first time that people have attempted to redefine pedophilia as a sexual orientation that should be included in the LGBT community.

WND reported that a group of mental health professionals created B4U-Act in 2003 to “help mental health professionals learn more about attraction to minors and to consider the effects of stereotyping, stigma, and fear.”

In 2010, two Canadian psychologists said that pedophilia is a sexual orientation. “True pedophiles have an exclusive preference for children, which is the same as having a sexual orientation.  You cannot change this person’s sexual orientation.  He may, however, remain abstinent,” Van Gijseghem, a psychologist and retired University of Montreal professor, told Parliament.

The 2013 WND article went on to report that with the laws that were being introduced at the time for gay rights could also pave the way for pedophilia rights.

“The language is so broad and vague, it arguably could include all forms of sexual orientation including pedophilia,” Brad Dacus, president of the Pacific Justice Institute, said.  “It’s not just the orientation that is protected, that conduct associated with the orientation is protected as well.”

This name change, as The Daily Caller pointed out, would follow the liberal trend of making things “politically correct.”  It’s concerning to think about how much things like pedophilia will be normalized if they are made “politically correct.”

Distinguished Eagle Scout Award

.jpg photo of Distinguished Eagle Scout Mike Rowe
Eagle Scout Mike Rowe, who was also awarded the Distinguiushed Eagle Scout over 5 years ago.

Mike Rowe Unloads on All-Inclusive ‘Scouts’ in Tucker Interview

In an interview this week with Fox News host Tucker Carlson, Eagle Scout Mike Rowe (who may have done a few notable things since) expressed concern over the recent changes in the Scouts, arguing that he hopes the organization would be “an antidote for the safe space environment that’s out there.”

Rowe made the remark when asked by Carlson about how “the scouts are no longer the Boy Scouts, but simply the Scouts” and how he felt about it.

“Well it’s funny you should ask, Tucker, because no less than 10,000 people have asked me that very question over the last month on my Facebook page,” Rowe said. “Distinguished Eagle Scout, if you’re keeping score.  Five or six years ago, I was awarded that, and it was very touching.”

Rowe indicated that he was adopting a wait-and-see attitude with the new initiative, which would let girls into the Scouts, but felt there were some ominous signs.

“Look, I’m watching what’s happening very carefully,” he said.  “I’ve sent 50 to 55,000 thousand letters out over the last 10 years to other Eagle Scouts, and I think the country needs the Scouts, I think the country needs the Future Farmers of America, and Skills USA, and 4H, desperately, now more than ever.

“So, it does concern me to see all the confusion swirling around the organization.  But like so many wounds, I’m afraid many of these are self-inflicted, and I also think some of the confusion that’s going on is legitimate.

“I read their official statement — while girls are being welcomed in, I didn’t read anything about integrated camping trips, or troop meetings.  I think it really is a play to compete more directly with the Girl Scouts.  And I understand why the Girl Scouts are upset, but since when is competition a bad thing?

“So I think character development and leadership development have never been more important than they are today, so my hope is that the Boy Scouts assume the opportunity that’s presenting itself and become an antidote for the safe space environment that’s out there and push back a little bit.  I mean, not to sound like the angry guy on your neighbor’s porch yelling at the kids on the lawn, but when I was in the Scouts in ’74 and ’75, it wasn’t a safe space there in the basement of our church. You’d go home with a bloody nose sometimes, or a black eye.  We had a boxing ring.

“You know, it was a vibrant place where you really could test yourself and fail in a way, that on the one hand, made you safe enough to attempt, but on the other hand didn’t try to check every box and please every single person,” Rowe added.  “It’s a tough time.  I’m sympathetic for the leaders, but I’m afraid you’ve got to draw the line somewhere and be very, very clear about what you stand for as well as against.”

When asked whether he thought something was ending, Rowe was ambivalent.

“I don’t know.  Again, you either evolve, or you die.  But at the same time, I think people are confused, because the Scouts simply haven’t come out and said categorically what they’re for, right?” Rowe said.

“So I just think this conversation touches every single hot point right now going on in popular culture, from tolerance to acceptance, which by the way, I’m not sure what the difference between those two things is anymore, but there used to be a big difference.”

Rowe added that “my hope for these youth-based organizations that help preach character is that they look for people who want to be challenged, and not curry favor so much with those who want a nice, reassuring pat on the head.”

After Carlson noted “that’s how the Episcopal Church died,” Rowe merely responded with, “Yeah, wow!”

Alas, one fears that the Scouts are moving in that safe space direction (the very idea of a boxing ring for Scouts sounds almost insane in this day and age, which should give you a good idea of where we’ve gone as a society).  However, they won’t go there — and nor will society — without a bit of pushback.  And, as you can tell, Rowe is going to be one of those pushing back.

Wichita KS Toddler Remembered

Child Abuse victim laid to rest

WICHITA, KS  –  A couple dozen people including family, friends and community members gathered at St Joseph’s Catholic Church, 145 S. Millwood Ave., Thursday morning to say their final goodbyes to two-year-old Tony Bunn.

.jpg photo of Kansas child killed by child abuse
Tony Bunn, 2-years-old

“Nobody knows how many times I’ve broken down and cried, I want to tell you something, there won’t be any doubt, you’re so wonderful to think about, but so hard to be without.”

Zak Woolheater doesn’t know the author of this poem, but it’s helped him put into words the pain his family feels at the loss of his grandson, Tony Bunn.

“He was the most amazing kid you’ll ever see,” Zak says.

First responders were called to Tony’s home on May 4.  Police say he wasn’t breathing.  He was hospitalized and died two days later.

An autopsy report showed he had blunt force trauma injuries.

The family’s attorney said Thursday was not only about Tony but about keeping other children safe and never having another child taken from abuse.

“We are still trying to figure out what all needs to be done, it’s certainly not just a DCF problem, and not just a law enforcement problem.  That is a systemic breakdown,” said Shayla Johnston, the Woolheater family’s attorney.

Tony was buried St. Mary’s Allepo Cemetery in Garden Plain.

His mother, Elizabeth Woolheater and her boyfriend, Lucas Diel, are charged with first-degree murder in his death.

They are set to be back in court next week.

The Secret Password

.jpg photo of a Child Predator graphic
A Child Predator can steal the most productive part of a Child’s future in a matter of minutes.

Protect Your Children From Predators

By: Kait King

I am very proud to introduce Ms Kait King, a true Writer Extraordinaire.  You can continue to read the whole original story on Ms Kait King’s site, The writer’s Blogk, by selecting the link immediately following this short excerpt. But first, I want to say that Ms King is a very kind person, with a heart of pure gold, and quiet obviously, a very good Parent and writer.  Thank You all for reading, and when you are finished reading this unforgettable story, please do as Ms King wishes:  Please Pass It On!
Robert StrongBow

A copy of a letter I sent to all of the primary schools to save children – simple and super effective!  Please pass it on.

My son is 27 years old now and it has always amazed me at how many parents through those 26 years, and even now, who have no idea about the concept of the Secret Password.

I used to work as a National Intelligence Support Officer for the police.

I have had projects that have highlighted the danger our children are in while getting to and from school and this is an issue which is not going to go away.

I have a simple solution that may help to keep children safer than they are now.

My son was five and starting school, and with my background and experience I was very aware of the dangers of kerb crawlers and people who would snatch kids from off the street.

via Protect Your Children From Predators: The Secret Password – please pass it forward! | The writer’s blogk

Raise A Well Behaved Child

.jpg photo of a good family with family values
Raising a well-behaved Child – and not a brat.

Top 10 Parenting Pitfalls

Experts offer advice that will help you raise a well-behaved child – instead of a brat.
By Dulce Zamora

Parenting is no walk in the park, especially on the days when your little angel, whether he’s 6 or 16, decides to act like a demon.

If it’s the temper tantrum in the toy store over the latest video game, or the daily fight over math homework, or the food fight in a restaurant on Friday night, parents have a choice:  To react in a way that will only make matters worse when the bell rings for round two, or respond like the calm, cool, and collected parents we see on TV shows like Nanny 911  –  after weeks of live-in, televised therapy.

What is the secret to their success, other than public humiliation?

“Overall, with any scenario, the worst thing a parent can do that helps bratty behavior blossom is to not set clear expectations and not have consequences to a child’s behavior,” says Jenn Berman, PhD, a psychologist in private practice in Beverly Hills who specializes in family therapy.

The TV Toy

It’s Saturday morning, you’re doing laundry, the kids are watching their morning cartoons, and it happens:  Your middle child sees the toy of his dreams on TV, starts in with the begging, and doesn’t let up.

Brat-building response:  “A lot of kids see things on TV  –  games, food, or dolls –  and then they start nagging until they get it,” says Berman.  “If you run to the store to buy your child exactly what they want, then you’ve taught them that nagging is an effective tool for getting their way.”

Angel-building response:  “You can say, ‘It’s a cool toy.  Let me find out how much it is, and I can help you save your allowance for it,'” says Berman.  “You are teaching your child to work toward a goal  –  instead of giving in.  It helps the child learn about goals, saving money, and it’s a good response for both parent and child.”

The Bribes

You’re having your boss over for dinner on Friday night, and while you begged your sister to watch the kids for the evening, no such luck.  Is it time to start bribing them to be quiet with expensive sneakers or the latest handbag from Dolce & Gabbana?

Brat-building response:  “Parents often try to buy good behavior by getting their kids expensive gifts,” says Berman.  “And then they say, ‘I don’t understand why she isn’t better behaved?  I get her everything she wants!'” These cool gifts lose their meaning and the child feels entitled and less well behaved.”

Angel-building response:  “Allow the child the opportunity to earn what you give them, and set limits around their expectations,” says Berman.  “Tell them, ‘You can get one pair of shoes within this amount of money.’  Teach them early on how to make choices.”

The Sleepover

Her bags are packed and she’s ready to go to the sleepover, except for one thing:  She forgot to ask for your permission.

Brat-building behavior:  Even though she’s screaming bloody murder, if you let her get away with it once, she’ll do it again, and again and again.  “You’ve taught your child that screaming long enough will get her what she wants, and now you’ve created your own private hell,” Berman tells WebMD.

Angel-building behavior:  “As a parent, it is always considerate and helpful to let a child know your thinking, so your child knows why you don’t want her to go to the sleepover, so it doesn’t seem like you are being unreasonable,” says Berman.  “But if you shared your reasoning, and she keeps yelling, you have to stand your ground.”

The Divide and Conquer

You’ve been very clear and given your son a decisive NO when he asked, “Can I go to the birthday party, puh-lease?”  His tactic?  To ask dad.

Brat-building behavior:  “When a child gets ‘no’ from mom, and ‘yes’ from dad, it teaches them they can divide and conquer,” says Berman.  “They learn that they can divide their parents and fool them, and if they are manipulative enough, they can get what they want.”

Angel-building behavior:  “Enforce in advance,” says Berman.  “Tell a child that if you ask mom and get ‘no,’ and then you ask dad and get ‘yes,’ the ‘no’ still stands, and your punishment for asking us both is xyz.”

The Screaming in the Store

We’ve all seen it:  The screaming child in the toy store.  He wants the latest video game, and he’s not shutting up until he has it.

Brat-building response:  “If you give in, you teach your child that when he acts like a brat he can get what he wants,” says Dan Kindlon, author of Too Much of a Good Thing:  Raising Children of Character in an Indulgent Age.  “You’re reinforcing his bratty behavior.”

Angel-building response:  “There are two ways to approach it,” says Kindlon, who teaches child psychology at Harvard University.

First, plan ahead, and second, plan a response.

“Make a deal with them beforehand  –  you are going to buy them something and it’s only going to cost $5,” says Kindlon.  “Or tell them, ‘I’m going shopping for your cousin and this is not for you.’  Give them structure beforehand so they’re not caught off guard.  Then, if they still explode in the store, ignore them, say you are not going to listen anymore.  Then you leave the store and take them with you.”

The Car Ride

You have 300 miles in front of you when your youngest explodes in a temper tantrum that rivals the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius.

Brat-building response:  “If you just start yelling and screaming at her, it’s not going to help,” Kindlon tells WebMD.  “And a major mistake most parents make is to give the child an ultimatum, like ‘If you keep this up you’re not going to watch TV when you get home.'”

But even though their tantrum continues ad nauseam, the TV goes on when the family gets home because the parent is beaten down.

“This teaches a child that the best way to get what they want is to behave like a brat,” says Kindlon.

Angel-building response:  “Plan ahead,” says Kindlon “Bring snacks, games, and things to keep them entertained in the car.  If that doesn’t work, help them understand the consequences of their behavior.  Again, with the ultimatum, if you use one, stick to it:  ‘If you don’t stop behaving this way, you don’t get to watch TV when you get home.'”

The Lack of Respect

Your kid just called you a name, or talked back, or showed you some all-around lack of what Aretha Franklin likes to call R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Brat-building response:  “If you sink to their level and use the same language back at them, you’re modeling bad behavior,” says Kindlon.  “You’re teaching them the wrong way to deal with something and someone when you’re upset.”

Angel-building response:  “Dock a kid fifty cents on their allowance when they use a tone of voice or an inappropriate word you don’t like,” says Kindlon. “Maintain your cool.  Show mature behavior, and give them consequences for their bad behavior.”

The Restaurant

You just sat down to dinner with your husband and three kids at a local restaurant when the outbursts start.

Brat-building behavior:  “What happens is there is talk of punishment and threats at the restaurant, like ‘I’m going to take way your play date on Sunday,’ or ‘No TV for a week,'” says Paul Donahue, PhD, director of Child Development Associates in Scarsdale, N.Y.  “Punishments don’t work as well as a rewards, or the threats are idle because the kid knows that the parent won’t take away their TV.”

Angel-building response:  “Before you get to the restaurant, tell your child what you expect in terms of behavior,” says Donahue.  “If your behavior is good, here is what privilege will come your way, whether its dessert at the restaurant, or that they get to watch a movie when they get home.”

Kids need to understand that their privileges are based on their behavior, explains Donahue.

While I’m not suggesting you bribe your kids or take them to Toys ‘R’ Us because they sit at the dinner table, they need to understand that the things they enjoy are privileges and they can have those things if they behave well,” says Donahue.  “Kids have to have an understanding that good behavior is expected, and if they behave well, good things will come their way.”

The Morning Routine

It’s hard enough for you to get out of bed at 6 a.m., let alone get your two kids out of bed. Should you let them sleep late, just this once?

Brat-building response:  “Sometimes kids come downstairs in the morning, they watch TV, they get around to eating their breakfast, they get dressed, the process gets delayed, mom or dad gets frustrated and angry, and maybe they make the bus, maybe the don’t,” says Donahue.  Better yet, the whole routine starts over again the next day.

Angel-building response:  “Kids shouldn’t come down and watch TV or play a video game first thing in the morning,” says Donahue.  “It’s like saying you get to have this fun experience before you get dressed, brush your teeth, or do your work.  You have to take care of your responsibilities first.”

The Homework

As your child gets older and wiser, his pile of homework grows  –  as does the frustration you feel in making sure he gets it all done.

Brat-building response:  “We want our kids to do well in school, and yet we are not clear that homework takes precedent over a play date or after-school activities,” says Donahue.  “So then the homework gets left until after dinner, and then it’s diminishing returns:  they’re tired, and it’s getting much more difficult to get them to do it, and they don’t have incentive to get it done.”

Angel-building response:  “There needs to be a reasonable structure for homework,” says Donahue.  “Say to your kids, ‘At 3 p.m. you get to play, but at 4 p.m., you sit down and do your homework.’  It’s especially important in most families that homework get done before dinner.  Set the structure in place so when they are older and they have more activities, they know they still need to get homework done before dinner.”

Parenting Tips

No matter the scenario, here are tips for dealing with parenting pitfalls:

Mean business.   “Speak to your child like you mean business, and send clear messages when you’re communicating with your kids,” says Donahue.

Stick to your guns.  “The toughest thing is to have endurance,” says Donahue. “Stick to your guns, even when the kids are whining and pushing your buttons. Kids know that if we have a history of not sticking to what we say, they’re going to push and push.  Have the endurance and the strength and the energy to keep up with them.”

Plan ahead.  “Parents have to do a better job of helping kids to anticipate the behavior that is expected of them beforehand,” Donahue tells WebMD. “When you’re in the middle of a situation, you’re busy and rushing and don’t think about it, and then things can get out of control.”

Take care of yourself.  “Sleep more, exercise, and take care of yourself,” says Donahue.  “Parenting is extremely exhausting work.”

Resource:  WebMD, Inc.
https://www.webmd.com/