Tag Archives: Children

Disney Teaching Future Porn Stars

Illuminati Hypersexualization of Children Exposed!

Disney Pedophilia and Satanic Rolemodels

Published on Oct 12, 2014
Exposing subliminal sexualizing content aimed at young children from Hollywood, TV shows, Movies, and the pedophile fashion industry. Disney channel and Disney movies exposed. Young girls being turned into miniature sex kittens. Illuminati brainwashing and destruction of Morality.

Today I am going to attempt to re-equip at least a few of the world’s Bicycle-Built-For-2 Households With A Kickstand

My Friends, I want to warn you ahead of time that should you listen to me, AND watch this video, you WILL be forced to at least partially admit I WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG!!!!  OK, that just kind of slipped out, what I am trying to say is President Obama DID NOT start the events we are witnessing.

As I said, “This plan began with my parents, at least, or even possibly my Grandparents, this was MOM’s APPLE PIE AMERICA”.  All my Mom’s side of the almost every parent and Grandparent could think about was “OK I KNOW little Junior did something so lets beat him some more with the sparetherodspoiljunior bullwhip.  But while only trying to cover their sins by beating us, they turned the rats loose with the old let’s make it so we can vote our own raises block of cheese.

Dr Timothy Leary almost spoiled that, so the RACE CARD was played, and blinded people for a minute.  But more and more people were Turning on, Tuning in, and Dropping out; so that didn’t fool the “enlightened”.  So Jane Fonda did her bit(YES I AM SAYING IT WAS SCRIPTED, JUST LIKE THE TENNIS MATCH WITH BILLY JEAN KING), I don’t even want to talk about the draft cards and flags,(surely not) I feel sick….

May 4, 1970……………………………………….  The song you’re thinking of is by Neal Young and Crazy Horse.  just watch the movie please

 

#GivingTuesday

 

Our Children are In Need

Our Children are being held hostage by all the Violence that has become an everyday thing,  Our Children are being victimized by  Child abuse, Sexual Abuse, Physical Abuse, Human Trafficking, Neglect, and Bullying.  They are NOT being taught LOVE, HONOR, RESPECT, and DUTY, all the basic qualities necessary to be a GOOD CITIZEN and GOOD NEIGHBOR.

There is few good places that truly care about Our Children!!!!  The Child Services of Our States are dropping the ball.  But NOT IN MY WORLD!!!! KNOWS who has proven track records.  OUR FRIENDS spend the MOST PER DOLLAR on Our Children.  But more than that, Our Children are taken care of when they get there.

Today is #GIVINGTUESDAY, open your minds to what is happening to Our Children, Open Your Hearts because every Child deserves the chance to be safe, while growing up, so they have a chance to make this World a better place.  THIS is the best place to help Our Children for The Holidays.

Ark of Hope for Children

Ark of Hope for Children
PO Box 342, Alachua,FL 32615-0342
(386) 454-1280
http://arkofhopeforchildren.org

email; hope@arkofhopeforchildren.org

“Breaking the chains of abuse for those victimized as children by human trafficking, child abuse and bullying to lead them into lives filled with faith, hope and love.”

Ark of Hope for Children brings care and awareness for those victimized as children by human trafficking, child abuse and bullying. We are a human rights organization with programs that provide care for, and awareness of, survivors without discrimination of any kind. As a Christian based nonprofit we focus on unconditional love and transformation to help victims become empowered survivors. We are a nonprofit organization, #59-3585457, with further information listed on Guidestar.org. Ark of Hope for Children acts as the umbrella over all of the following programs;

RemovingChains.org is our global live chat survivor support website with 12 topically focused chat rooms for group or private help. We provide listening and mentoring for all ages of survivors through specialized text only chat rooms. Examples include rooms for Adult Survivors of Child Abuse, Male and Female Survivors, Ritual Abuse, Trafficking Victims and more. We facilitate connections to the survivor’s local professionals such as therapy, law enforcement or legal aid while providing a growing library of self-help resources on our site. http://removingchains.org

UnChained Project is mobilizing internationally to bring local awareness and action for survivors within the region where they live. Regional awareness groups will help local survivors know they are cared about. These groups focus on survivors of child abuse, child trafficking and bullying and can provide support groups, awareness events, school meetings, and fundraising activities for Ark of Hope programs. A customized Facebook Groups is created for each region with an active leader and team members. http://unchainedproject.org

Harbourage Transitional Living Center of north central Florida provides short-term emergency placement for victimized females and males rescued from human trafficking or at risk of being trafficked. Survivors are protected, nurtured and empowered in our safe home-like environment. Assessments are made towards the best plan for their current and future needs, while mentoring and faith-based counsel provide immediate support. In addition a long-term shelter is planned to bring people from the point of victim to thriving, self-sufficient survivors. http://arkofhopeforchildren.org/programs/harbourage-child-trafficking-safe-homes 

 

 


	

Brown Recluse Kills Alabama Boy

Branson Riley Carlisle Dies At 5: Spider Bite

Over the weekend, a 5-year-old boy named Branson Riley Carlisle of Albertsville, Alabama passed away after being bitten by a brown recluse spider that is often found in the Southeast and in Alabama.
The boy’s parents, Jessica Carlisle and A.J. Mays, rapidly took him to the Marshall Medical Center. But throughout the night, his condition worsened and he was transferred to Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children, where he died.

Carlisle and Mays also brought the spider to the hospital, where it was identified as a brown recluse spider, according to Claudette DeMuth, director of marketing at Marshall Medical Center. DeMuth said in a statement:hat the cold weather has caused spiders to come inside.

Ann Slattery, who is the director of Regional Poison Control Center Children’s of Alabama, said that it was a good thing that Branson Riley Carlisle’s parents brought the spider to the hospital, so they could determine the specie.

According to the University of California Riverside researcher, Rick Vetter, the brown recluse that killed little Carlisle, doesn’t spin a web, its defense is to bite.

The author of “Spiders of the Eastern United States: A Photographic Guide,” shared: “They come out at night after all the lights are off and creep around.They live in houses, especially old ones.They come out at night after all the lights are off and creep around. They also like hiding in piles of old clothes or newspapers or old woodpiles.” He explained that the brown recluse spider venom is called a cytotoxin and it causes the skin and what’s beneath to erode. The venom can also cause the breakdown of red blood cells. Vetter added: “Usually what happens the skin becomes dead and the tissue around the bite blisters up.Sometimes the doctors will have to 

the area leaving a cavity. Normally it’s a highly localized thing. The symptoms often start with itching 15 to 20 minutes after the bite. Sometimes the site looks like a bullseye with a blister and a bruise around it.”

Slattery said that last year, there were 89 calls about suspected brown recluse bites, but in the majority of cases, it was some other condition. She also revealed that after 32 years on the job, this is the first death caused by a brown recluse bite to her knowledge.
In 2004, a family of 4, living in Lenexa, Kansas found 2,055 brown recluse spiders in their house in 6 months. While the spiders crawled on the walls, the carpet, in the sinks, and bathtubs, none of the family members or pets were bitten.

Branson Riley Carlisle was laid to rest on Wednesday.

Family Homelessness

What Is Family Homelessness?

Every year, hundreds of thousands of American families become homeless, including more than 1.6 million children. These families are hidden from our view. They move frequently, and many are doubled-up in overcrowded apartments with relatives or friends. Others sleep in cars and campgrounds or send their children to stay with relatives to avoid shelter life. Once in shelter, despite the efforts of dedicated staff, life can be noisy, chaotic, and lack privacy. Homelessness increases the likelihood that families will separate or dissolve.

Family homelessness is caused by the combined effects of lack of affordable housing, unemployment, limited access to resources and supports, health and mental health challenges, the challenges of raising children as a single parent, and experiences of violence. As the gap between housing costs and income continues to widen, more and more families are at risk of homelessness. Even a seemingly minor event can trigger a catastrophic outcome and catapult a family onto the streets.

Families experiencing homelessness are under considerable stress. Homelessness is a devastating experience that significantly impacts the health and well-being of adults and children. Often, members of homeless families have experienced trauma. These experiences affect how children and adults think, feel, behave, relate, and cope.

http://www.familyhomelessness.org/facts.php?p=tm

More Homeless Children in California

2014-11-26-HomelessChildrenInUS-1Child Homelessness on the Rise in U.S.

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence.

Titled “America’s Youngest Outcasts,” the report being issued Monday by the National Center on Family Homelessness calculates that nearly 2.5 million American children were homeless at some point in 2013. The number is based on the Department of Education’s latest count of 1.3 million homeless children in public schools, supplemented by estimates of homeless pre-school children not counted by the DOE.

The problem is particularly severe in California, which has one-eighth of the U.S. population but accounts for more than one-fifth of the homeless children with a tally of nearly 527,000. Carmela DeCandia, director of the national center and a co-author of the report, noted that the federal government has made progress in reducing homelessness among veterans and chronically homeless adults. “The same level of attention and resources has not been targeted to help families and children,” she said. “As a society, we’re going to pay a high price, in human and economic terms.”

Child homelessness increased by 8 percent nationally from 2012 to 2013, according to the report, which warned of potentially devastating effects on children’s educational, emotional and social development, as well as on their parents’ health, employment prospects and parenting abilities. The report included a composite index ranking the states on the extent of child homelessness, efforts to combat it, and the overall level of child well-being. States with the best scores were Minnesota, Nebraska and Massachusetts. At the bottom were Alabama, Mississippi and California.

California’s poor ranking did not surprise Shahera Hyatt, director of the California Homeless Youth Project. The crux of the problem, she said, is the state’s high cost of living, coupled with insufficient affordable housing. “People think, ‘Of course we are not letting children and families be homeless,’ so there’s a lot of disbelief,” Hyatt said. “California has not invested in this issue.” Hyatt, 29, was homeless on and off throughout adolescence, starting when her parents were evicted when she was in 7th grade. At 15, she and her older brother took off and survived by sleeping in the tool sheds, backyards and basements of acquaintances.

“These terms like ‘couch surfing’ and ‘doubled-up’ sound a lot more polite than they are in practice,” she said. “For teenagers, it might be exchanging sex for a place to stay or staying someplace that does not feel safe because they are so mired in their day-to-day survival needs.”

Near San Francisco, Gina Cooper and her son, then 12, had to vacate their home in 2012 when her wages of under $10 an hour became insufficient to pay the rent. After a few months as nomads, they found shelter and support with Home & Hope, an interfaith program in Burlingame, California, and stayed there five months before Cooper, 44, saved enough to be able to afford housing on her own. “It was a painful time for my son,” Cooper said. “On the way to school, he would be crying, ‘I hate this.’”

In mostly affluent Santa Barbara, the Transition House homeless shelter is kept busy with families unable to afford housing of their own. Executive director Kathleen Baushke said that even after her staff gives clients money for security deposits and rent, they go months without finding a place to live. “Landlords aren’t desperate,” she said. “They won’t put a family of four in a two-bedroom place because they can find a single professional who will take it.” She said neither federal nor state housing assistance nor incentives for developers to create low-income housing have kept pace with demand. “We need more affordable housing or we need to pay people $25 an hour,” she said. “The minimum wage isn’t cutting it.”

Among the current residents at Transition House are Anthony Flippen, Savannah Austin and their 2-year-old son, Anthony Jr. Flippen, 28, said he lost his job and turned to Transition House as his unemployment insurance ran out. The couple has been on a list to qualify for subsidized housing since 2008, but they aren’t counting on that option and hope to save enough to rent on their own now that Flippen is back at work as an electrician. Austin, due to have a second child in December, is grateful for the shelter’s support but said its rules had been challenging. With her son in tow, she was expected to vacate the premises each morning by 8 a.m. and not return before 5 p.m. “I’d go to the park, or drive around,” she said. “It was kind of hard.”

The new report by the National Center on Family Homelessness — a part of the private, nonprofit American Institutes for Research — says remedies for child homelessness should include an expansion of affordable housing, education and employment opportunities for homeless parents, and specialized services for the many mothers rendered homeless due to domestic violence. Efforts to obtain more resources to combat child homelessness are complicated by debate over how to quantify it.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development conducts an annual one-day count of homeless people that encompasses shelters, as well as parks, underpasses, vacant lots and other locales. Its latest count, for a single night in January 2013, tallied 610,042 homeless people, including 130,515 children.

Defenders of HUD’s method say it’s useful in identifying the homeless people most in need of urgent assistance. Critics contend that HUD’s method grossly underestimates the extent of child homelessness and results in inadequate resources for local governments to combat it. They prefer the Education Department method that includes homeless families who are staying in cheap motels or doubling up temporarily in the homes of friends or relatives.

“Fixing the problem starts with adopting an honest definition,” said Bruce Lesley, president of the nonprofit First Focus Campaign for Children. “Right now, these kids are sort of left out there by themselves.”

Lesley’s group and some allies have endorsed a bill introduced in Congress, with bipartisan sponsorship, that would expand HUD’s definition to correlate more closely with that used by the Education Department. However, the bill doesn’t propose any new spending for the hundreds of thousands of children who would be added to the HUD tally.

Shahera Hyatt, of the California Homeless Youth Project, says most of the homeless schoolchildren in her state aren’t living in shelters. “It’s often one family living in extreme poverty going to live with another family that was already in extreme poverty,” she said. “Kids have slept in closets and kitchens and bathrooms and other parts of the house that have not been meant for sleeping.”

To read the full report and find out where your state ranks, please visit  http://www.homelesschildrenamerica.org/