Tag Archives: Cover up

District Court Decision Reversed For PPH

.jpg photo of planned parenthood logo
Planned Parenthood employees admit that some doctors performed abortions to obtain fetal tissue for their own research.

AG Paxton Commends 5th Circuit
Decision Regarding Exclusion of
Planned Parenthood from Medicaid

AUSTIN, TX  –  Attorney General Ken Paxton today commended the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit after it reversed the district court’s decision preventing Texas from eliminating Planned Parenthood from the Medicaid program.

“The 5th Circuit’s ruling shows that the district court applied the wrong legal standard,” Attorney General Paxton said.  “Planned Parenthood’s reprehensible conduct, captured in undercover videos, proves that it is not a ‘qualified’ provider under the Medicaid Act, so we are confident we will ultimately prevail.”

During oral argument, the attorney general’s legal team recounted raw, unedited footage from eight hours of undercover videos showing violations of medical and ethical standards by Texas Planned Parenthood officials.  This footage was also described in the Fifth Circuit’s opinion.

In the videos, Planned Parenthood employees admit that some doctors performed abortions to obtain fetal tissue for their own research and would manipulate the timing and methods of abortions.

.jpg photo of fetal tissue
Fetal Tissue Harvested For Research By Planned Parenthood.

The Fifth Circuit included a picture of the fetal tissue Planned Parenthood was harvesting. Federal laws prohibit researchers from performing abortions to secure fetal tissue for their own research under such circumstances, and prohibits modifying abortion procedures to obtain tissue for research purposes.

In December 2016, the inspector general of Texas Health and Human Services removed Planned Parenthood from the state’s Medicaid program for the video footage of actions that “violate generally accepted medical standards,” and for making false statements to law enforcement.

Though Planned Parenthood is still under investigation, it receives around $3.1 million a year in Texas Medicaid funding.

View a copy of the 5th Circuit decision here

Same WA HHS-CPS Tainted Stats, Lies, Billion$$ Wasted

.jpg photo of release of new HHS report
As states begin actively watching over CPS, like Texas, the true numbers will come out.

New data: Child Abuse deaths rise,
notably in Texas, Indiana

There is not 686,000 calls taken for Child maltreatment, there are at least 3,300,000 calls annually for Child Abuse, and this is estimated to be less than a quarter of the actual instances of Child Maltreatment, which translates to at least 13,200,000 actual instances of Child maltreatment.

However, somehow CPS hacks through all the Abused Children, and comes up with just 686,000 instances of abuse, this is why all Child Abuse calls should be made to 911.  Also, “under staffed”, “case-load too high”, and “under-funded”, is stock, go-to excuses every time, yet these people’s transgressions are well documented: Making fake abuse calls on innocent people, Throwing thousands of unchecked reports in dumpsters, Deleting answering machines, Taking weeks to investigate priority cases which are supposed to be checked out within 24 hours, and a real favorite of theirs is Manufacturing Instruments(Documents) of the court…. SO THEY CAN HURT INNOCENT CHILDREN, PARENTS, AND GOOD FAMILIES!!!!

All of this is a matter of record, just as their “5 Children die a day from abuse”, the real number is at least 10 – 13, and possibly as high as 15 Children die every day from Child Maltreatment.  And finally, “UNDERFUNDED????”, at this point in time, there are several cases of CPS employees ripping off the system(the Tax payers) for 5 and 6 figures by traveling first class, among other things.
Robert StrongBow

INDIANAPOLIS, IN  –  Newly released federal figures show a sharp rise in child abuse fatalities in the U.S., with the bulk of the increase occurring in two states — Indiana and Texas — where child-welfare agencies have been in disarray.

Not one state has met all of the minimum child welfare standards even one (1) time since this system was put in place.
“Shame On U.S.” Report

According to a report released this week by the Department of Health and Human Services, there were 1,700 fatalities resulting from child maltreatment reported in fiscal year 2016, compared to 1,589 the previous year — a 7 percent increase.  The figures encompass data from every state but Maine, as well as from the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Accounting for most of the increase were Texas, where fatalities jumped from 162 to 217, and Indiana, where the death toll more than doubled from 34 to 70.

“It breaks my heart for the kids in this state right now,” said Juvenile Judge Marilyn A. Moores, whose Indianapolis courtroom has seen a surge in child welfare cases due to the opioid epidemic.

“Traditional systems of early warning are overwhelmed.  And parents, because of addiction, aren’t seeking intervention because their kids are going to be removed,” she added.  “It allows kids to die.  It’s a fact.”

Long festering problems in Indiana’s child welfare system exploded into public view in December, when the director of the Department of Child Services resigned with a scathing letter that accused Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb of making management changes and service cuts that “all but ensure children will die.”

“I choose to resign, rather than be complicit in decreasing the safety, permanency and well-being of children who have nowhere else to turn,” wrote Mary Beth Bonaventura, a former juvenile judge appointed to lead the agency by then-Gov. Mike Pence in 2013.

In recent years, the number of child welfare cases in Indiana has skyrocketed, rising from about 13,000 in 2012 to nearly 24,000 last year.  Funding, meanwhile, has not kept pace, said Cathy Graham, executive director of the Indiana Association of Resources and Child Advocacy.

Advocates paint a picture of an agency in perpetual triage, with caseworkers spread so thin that they have little choice but to cut corners.  The agency does not have enough caseworkers to meet a minimum requirement set in state law and turnover has been a major problem, according to the agency’s most recent annual report.

Holcomb launched a review in December.  A preliminary report released Thursday found the state has an inadequate case management system.

In Texas, abuse-related fatalities have continued to rise despite high-level personnel changes at the child welfare agency, new legislative appropriations, and a federal judge, Janis Graham Jack, declaring in 2015 that the foster care system violated the constitutional rights of youngsters’ placed in long-term foster care.

In January, the judge issued her final order in the case, saying the state’s foster care system remained “broken.”  She also ordered improvements in regards to record keeping and the handling of foster care placements.  Texas appealed the ruling.

Two years ago, a commission created by Congress concluded that the United States lacks coherent, effective strategies for reducing the number of children who die each year from abuse and neglect.  Although the number of such deaths reported by HHS has hovered at around 1,500 to 1,600 annually in recent years, the commission — citing gaps in how the data is compiled — suggested the actual number may be as high as 3,000 a year.

The commission issued an update this week noting that states across the country were moving to implement some of its recommendations for preventing maltreatment deaths.

The new report released by HHS’s Children’s Bureau, formally known as the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System, does not offer theories explaining the sharp rise in child fatalities, but it provides demographic data on the victims.

According to the report, 70 percent of the victims were younger than 3.  Fatality rates were higher for boys than for girls, and higher for African-American children than for whites and Hispanics.

Parents — acting alone, together or with other individuals — were the perpetrators in 78 percent of the deaths.

Looking more broadly at national trends, the report estimated that 676,000 children were victims of abuse and neglect in 2016, a 1 percent drop from 2015. Most of the cases involved neglect; about 18 percent involved physical abuse — up slightly from 2015.

“When your data is flawed, every other part of your system is going to be flawed.”
Elisa Weichel, a staff attorney with the Children’s Advocacy Institute

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren’t Being Enforced, Report Finds

January 27, 2015
Laws intended to protect children from abuse and neglect are not being properly enforced, and the federal government is to blame
.

First Net Neutrality Then Freedom Of Speech

.jpg photo of man responsible for the repeal of Net Neutrality
Ajit Pai is Big Money’s plant in the FCC.

The FCC Just Faked Out America With
Last-Minute Vote On Consumer
Complaint Process

Ajit Pai is BIG MONEY’s plant in the FCC.  We have one chance left to save Net Neutrality, contact your Law Maker in Washington and tell them to support Net Neutrality by overturning the FCC’s repeal of Net Neutrality with the CRA.
Robert StrongBow

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) seems to have pulled some fast and fancy moves this week, as a controversial change to its complaint review process was seemingly pulled, and then suddenly passed.

Today, the FCC’s four remaining commissioners voted along party lines to approve a package of rule changes around how it handles consumer feedback, including complaints against internet service providers (ISPs), following several long-term scandals about its actions and/or inaction in this area.

Earlier this week, one aspect of that package drew public ire when a series of media reports pointed out that more Americans might have to pay $225 to have the FCC review their complaints.

California Revives Stronger Net Neutrality Bill After Public Backlash

The matter at hand, as Motherboard deftly explained, is this:

As it stands, the FCC currently accepts two kinds of complaints from cable or broadband subscribers:  formal and informal.  Informal complaints are free but often ignored.  In contrast, formal complaints cost a $225 processing fee and kick off a cumbersome legal process involving hearings and paperwork most users won’t have the time for.

A fact sheet circulated by the FCC…  claims the agency’s proposed rule change simply “streamlines and consolidates procedural rules” involving said complaints.  But a letter sent to the FCC by Democratic Senators Frank Pallone Jr. and Mike Doyle claims that under the changes the FCC would have forwarded all informal complaints to ISPs without reading them, forcing consumers to pay a $225 fee if they want to be taken seriously by the agency.

Some confusion ensued, but ultimately the FCC reportedly said it would postpone voting on that matter in today’s hearing, but then Chairman Ajit Pai proposed and successfully passed it, anyway.

In his comprehensive summary of the whole situation, Gizmodo’s Rhett Jones described this week’s fast-moving mess the best: “By sneaking the changes through a vote via complicated legalese and the use of footnotes, the FCC has at least done us a favor in bringing it to everyone’s attention that the rules are bullshit and require taxpayers to cough up more money if they want to guarantee their complaint will be taken seriously.”

As media quoted widely, Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, the only remaining Democrat after Mignon Clyburn’s emphatic resignation earlier this year, called the decision “bonkers.”

Liberal’s Journalism Hall Of Shame Takes Another

.jpg photo of President Trump
Liberals have lied to the American people about caged children, and they’ve deliberately misrepresented the picture of the little girl who made the cover of Time magazine.

Investigation: Obama’s People Drugged,
Force-Fed Meds to Border Kids

The journalism hall of shame keeps getting more crowded.

A blockbuster report last week by the Center for Investigative Reporting cast a glaring light on a practice of U.S. authorities forcing immigrant children who have been separated from their parents to take psychiatric medicines – and forcibly injecting them if they resisted.

But in its eagerness to damn President Donald Trump and his administration for yet another aspect of handling illegal alien minors, according to a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner, the report left out one crucial detail.

The practice began during the Obama administration, and three of the four minors who are plaintiffs in a lawsuit naming Attorney General Jeff Sessions as a defendant were actually drugged long before Trump even took the oath of office.

As reported by the Washington Examiner’s Philip Wegmann, a lengthy article published Wednesday by Reveal, a publication of the Center for Investigative Reporting, failed to note anywhere in the text that the practice of drugging illegal alien children at a Houston-area social services contractor was begun while Obama was in the White House.

“The reporting is detailed and horrific, but the story creates a fake villain,” Wegmann wrote.  “The first words of the piece are ‘President Donald Trump.’  The article blames Trump and his current zero tolerance policy on immigration for creating “a zombie army of children.”  That is misleading at best.

“Three of the four children cited in the report were drugged during the Obama administration.  According to federal court filings, only one occurred while Trump was actually president.  The other three happened in 2016.  That timing is left out of the story, which, after opening with Trump’s policies, never mentions the years of the specific incidents of mistreatment.”

“Misleading at best”?  Wegmann is being kind.

As he noted, the first three words of the piece are “President Donald Trump.”  The piece was published in the middle of a nationwide hysteria over the status of children of illegal aliens who have been separated from their parents.  The wrong conclusion is obviously easy to draw — intentionally easy, apparently.

Only a reader willing to dig into the lawsuit filings that are linked to the article would have a clue that the practice is not some monstrosity cooked up by the administration of the man who’s now holds the presidency.

There is one hint in the article that the contractor – the Shiloh Treatment Center – had a history of problems that predate the Trump administration.  Namely, U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee had been calling for the center to be closed as early as 2014. (This might be the first and only time the regrettable Rep. Lee might not have been utterly wrong about something.)

But the editors of the ironically named Reveal had to know that the percentage of readers willing to read into the actual court filings linked with the article would be vanishingly small.  Likewise, the offhand reference to Lee doesn’t so much establish a time frame for problems at the center as emphasize the false impression that Democrats are the party that actually cares about children.

It looks like there’s more than “misleading” that’s happening here.  It looks a lot like a deliberate deception, a slight of journalistic hand that pretends to “reveal” some fact when conveying an idea that’s completely different from reality.

But what is absolutely clear is depth to which anti-Trump journalists are willing to go to smear the administration with loosely presented facts.

Given the hoaxes that have already been perpetrated surrounding the story of the “separated families” there’s no denying what’s happening.

Liberals have lied to the American people about caged children (using pictures taken during the Obama administration or outright staged for propaganda purposes). They’ve deliberately misrepresented the picture of the little girl who made the cover of Time magazine.

Major media (including USA Today) picked up a story about 1,450 children allegedly “lost” by the Trump administration when it wasn’t true.

And these are just a few of the examples.

The “Russian collusion” coverage has been skewed and tainted, but for sheer, outrageous misstatements and half-truths, it’s doubtful the country has seen distortion like this from the media since the “hands up, don’t shoot” lies of the Ferguson, Missouri, demonstrations turned into a national movement by Black Lives Matter thugs.

But the truth will come out eventually.  And it’s going to hurt the liberal media more than it hurts the rest of the country.

Until then, the journalism hall of shame is just going to keep getting bigger.

Obamas Legacy 90,000 “Lost” Immigrant Children

Obama administration delivered illegal immigrant children to predators,
lawmakers say

“Worse yet, the administration acknowledged that it can’t account for each of the 90,000 children it processed and released since the surge peaked in 2014.”

The Washington Times – Thursday, January 28, 2016

The Obama administration sent illegal immigrant children into “modern-day slavery” by turning them over to sponsors who forced them into child labor or subjected them to sexual abuse, members of Congress said Thursday as they demanded that top child protection officials explain how it could have happened.

“I do hope all you President Trump haters can read better than you remember history, because here is just one sick part of Obama’s Legacy, and also I hope everyone pays attention to the lies HHS/CPS tells to Our Law Makers.”
Robert StrongBow

CPS Still Pimping Children To Sex Traffickers

Where Are The 90,000+ Latino Children CPS

Social workers don’t verify all sponsors’ identities, don’t make site visits to see the conditions they’re sending the children to, don’t insist on follow-up visits to see how the kids are doing and don’t consider serious criminal records — including child sex charges — automatic disqualification for hosting a child, congressional investigators said.

As a result, the government delivered children into the hands of what amounted to sexual predators or abusers or placed them into abject poverty, investigators detailed in a report about malfeasance at the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement.

One girl was sent to live with a man who claimed he was her cousin and who had paid to smuggle her into the U.S. It turned out he wasn’t related at all, but instead had paid to bring the girl — with her mother’s encouragement — on the understanding that she would become his wife.  She became uncomfortable with their sexual relationship, came forward to report the real story and was taken into child protective services.

In another case, a boy was turned over to a man who posed as a relative, but was in fact connected to smugglers who forced the child to work almost 12 hours a day to pay off the $6,500 his mother gave to smuggle him into the U.S., congressional investigators said.  That situation is so prevalent it has earned a name: debt labor.

Worse yet, the administration acknowledged that it can’t account for each of the 90,000 children it processed and released since the surge peaked in 2014.

“It sounds like everything that could go wrong did go wrong,” said Sen. Rob Portman, chairman of the Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which conducted a six-month investigation into the government’s handling of the tens of thousands of children who have poured across the border in the past few years.

Mark Greenberg, acting assistant secretary at the Administration for Children and Families, the HHS agency that oversees the handling of the children, stumbled for answers during a two-hour grilling, but said his officers were only following their policies.

He insisted that if there was a fault, it lay with Congress, who needed to rewrite the laws if it wanted his social workers to do more to keep children safe.

“What we’re talking about today is our understanding under the law,” he said.

The Obama administration admits it was overwhelmed when unaccompanied children — those sent on the treacherous journey north without a parent or guardian in tow — streamed across the border at the rate of more than 10,000 a month during the peak in the summer of 2014.

Local communities waged “not in my backyard” campaigns to keep the children from being housed at facilities near them, so the administration looked to quickly process and release the kids.  Part of that meant relaxing the checks that were performed.

The Washington Times reported in July 2014, at the height of the surge, that advocates predicted children would be sent to unsafe homes, with one group estimating that as many as 10 percent of the children were being sent to live in unacceptable or dangerous conditions.

But 18 months on, the Obama administration has yet to revoke a single sponsor’s custody agreement, with the administration saying once it has placed a child in the hands of a sponsor — either a relative, family friend or someone else — they no longer have control.

If a sponsor refuses to answer questions and shuts the door in the face of a social worker, there’s nothing the administration can do, Mr. Greenberg told the Senate panel.

“Our view that we don’t have continuing custody after we release a child is a long-standing view,” he said.

“If this is an area where Congress wants the law to be different, Congress should change the law.”

HHS did not disqualify families even if the sponsor was an illegal immigrant in danger of being deported himself.

Home visits are made in just 4 percent of the tens of thousands of cases, and it wasn’t until earlier this week — years into the unaccompanied minor crisis — that HHS adopted a new policy preventing children from being shipped to homes where someone has been convicted of a sex crime.

“We’re talking about felony convictions for child abuse. Hello?” said a frustrated Sen. Claire McCaskill, Missouri Democrat.

About 90 percent of the children were sent to live with parents or close relatives, but that left thousands who were placed with other sponsors — often people claiming to be family friends.

The subcommittee investigation found some sponsors tried to claim multiple children, and some addresses were repeatedly listed on sponsorship forms, suggesting that government officials should have spotted something wrong.

In the worst public case so far, investigators said human traffickers used the government’s placement program to sneak kids from Guatemala to the U.S., where HHS processed them at the border, then delivered them to supposed family friends. But the friends turned out to be sponsors-for-hire who, as soon as they collected the kids from HHS, turned them over to the traffickers who were running an egg farm in Marion County, Ohio, and needed the children for cheap labor.

The children were forced to work 12-hour days, six or seven days a week, and lived together in a dilapidated trailer.  The traffickers withheld paychecks and threatened their families back home in Guatemala to intimidate the children, Mr. Portman said.

“It is intolerable that human trafficking — modern-day slavery — could occur in our own backyard.  But what makes the Marion cases even more alarming is that a U.S. government agency was responsible for delivering some of the victims into the hands of their abusers,” he said.