Tag Archives: Coverup

MA AG SAYS DANVERS SCHOOL OFFICIALS FAILED THE HOCKEY TEAM EVERY WAY POSSIBLE

Attorney General’s investigation faults Danvers officials in hockey scandal

DANVERS, MA  –  Danvers school officials failed in many ways to properly respond to racist, homophobic, antisemitic, and sexually abusive behavior in the high school boys’ ice hockey program, creating “a toxic team culture,” according to an investigation by the state attorney general’s office.

In response to the inquiry, Danvers school leaders signed a resolution Monday agreeing to develop additional initiatives aimed at preventing and responding to bullying, harassment, and biased misconduct.  Under the resolution, the attorney general’s office concluded its investigation without issuing any formal factual or legal findings but will oversee the new initiatives through the 2023-24 school year.

The investigation was the first into a high school athletic program during Attorney General Maura Healey’s seven years in office.

“Racism, homophobia, and bigotry of any kind have no place in our locker rooms, rinks, or playing fields — we need to create a safe and supportive environment for our students to grow and learn,” Healey said in a statement.  “With today’s resolution, the Danvers Public School District has committed to making needed changes to improve the culture in its schools and athletics program, protect students’ rights, and ensure that incidents of hate and bias are never overlooked again.”

Healey’s civil rights division launched the investigation after The Boston Globe reported in November that Danvers school and police officials had for more than 16 months concealed from the public details of alleged violent racist and homophobic bullying in the hockey program, as well as a group text chat among members of the 2019-20 team that was rife with deeply offensive racial, homophobic, and antisemitic language and images.

Danvers school officials, in agreeing to the resolution, did not contest numerous faults cited by the attorney general’s office in the town’s handling of the episode.  The attorney general’s office said the school district cooperated fully with the investigation and agreed voluntarily to the resolution.

The Danvers case is part of a wave of troubling alleged misconduct over the last year in Massachusetts high school sports that have shaken communities and captured the attention of human rights leaders and government officials.

“This agreement places schools districts on notice that they have a responsibility to respond to bias incidents and take prompt action when hate infiltrates school programs, especially athletics,” said Robert Trestan, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League.  “We welcome Danvers’ acceptance of responsibility and commitment to change, which represents a path forward for the entire community.”

The Globe focused on alleged misconduct involving the 2019-20 Danvers hockey team. But the attorney general’s investigation found that Danvers police Sergeant Stephen Baldassare, who coached the team from 2015 to 2021, permitted problems to develop several years earlier and to persist because he “failed to properly supervise the team and locker room in violation of district policies,” according to a letter Healey’s office sent last week to Danvers school leaders requesting they sign the resolution.

What’s more, the Danvers athletic department, led by Andrew St. Pierre, who is not named in the letter, regularly reviewed Baldassare’s performance but failed to identify any problems with the team culture, the letter states.

Baldassare has denied knowing about the alleged misconduct, and he has continued to work with Danvers students as supervisor of the town’s school resource police officers, despite calls for him to be reassigned.  But as the attorney general’s office last week prepared to publicly recommend his reassignment,  Baldassare agreed to accept another role in the Police Department at the end of the academic year.  Baldassare could not be reached for comment.

St. Pierre, however, remains on the job, unlike other school officials who were involved in the controversy, including longtime Superintendent Lisa Dana, who went out on medical leave in December and agreed last month to resign before the next academic year.

It was Dana’s office that permitted Baldassare to continue coaching the hockey team even after school officials became aware of the alleged misconduct — a decision the attorney general’s office noted in its resolution letter.

Troubling, too, the letter states, was the school district’s handling of “multiple, overlapping investigations” of the hockey allegations.

A member of the 2019-20 team told the Globe, the police, and school officials teammates restrained him in the locker room and beat his face with a plastic sex toy because he refused to shout the n-word as part of a ritual.  In another ritual, the player said, he was touched on the buttocks after team leaders directed players to strip naked in the dark.

Danvers police attributed the conduct to “immature behavior” and “poor attempts at humor” and determined no crimes occurred. .The attorney general’s inquiry, led by Abigail Taylor, chief of the civil rights division, and Assistant Attorney General Jon Burke, found school officials then may have responded inadequately to the misconduct allegations based on the police findings.

“School officials are responsible for enforcing school policies — not criminal laws — and must independently investigate and respond to allegations of biased misconduct in order to protect students’ rights at school,” the letter to the school district states.

Only after the school board later launched an additional investigation by an outside attorney did the extent of the hockey team’s problems become clearer, the letter indicates.

“The outside investigator concluded that misconduct on the team was significantly more severe than originally identified by either” the school district or police, the letter states.

Yet even then school officials apparently failed to initiate proper disciplinary procedures for the alleged perpetrators, according to the resolution letter.

Healey’s office also challenged the school district’s public statements that the hockey players could not be disciplined for alleged racist, homophobic, and antisemitic texts because they were private, off-campus communications.  The attorney general’s letter asserts the district did have legal standing to sanction the students because the group texts were used by players to coordinate team activities and included messages that were exchanged on team bus trips.

“Moreover, schools have the authority to discipline students for even ostensibly private speech that involves, encourages, or fosters an environment that results in bullying or harassment,” the letter states, citing Massachusetts case law.

Danvers school leaders also were faulted for not effectively communicating with the public about the hockey allegations.

Under the resolution, Danvers agreed to submit its new policies and procedures for the attorney general’s approval before implementing them.  The district also must train coaches, teachers, and other staff on policies involving complaints, investigations, discipline, and communicating with the public.

In addition, Danvers is required through the 2023-24 school year to report any additional incidents of bullying, harassment, or biased misconduct to the attorney general’s office.

Last month, the North Shore NAACP completed its own investigation of the scandal and called for changes.

“We are grateful that the AG’s office proactively investigated this case and negotiated an appropriate resolution,” chapter president Natalie Bower said.  “We now hope the entire town of Danvers — the school, police department, town hall, and individual community members — all take to heart their individual responsibility.”

Danvers Leaders Targeted By AG, NAACP Report After Hockey Team Hazing

AG investigation, NAACP report target Danvers leaders in wake of hockey team controversy

DANVERS, MA  –  Danvers leaders faced new fallout Wednesday from alleged violent racist, homophobic, and antisemitic behavior by its high school boys hockey team, as the state attorney general’s office disclosed it is investigating the school system’s handling of the case and the NAACP called for changes in the Police Department over its role in the controversy.

Attorney General Maura Healey’s office had previously stopped short of acknowledging it had launched an investigation, saying only that it was “looking into” the Danvers case.  But a spokesperson said Tuesday that a preliminary review has since triggered a formal investigation.

Notable among the allegations the school district withheld were statements by a member of the 2019-20 Danvers team that other players pinned him down in the locker room and beat him about the face for refusing to shout the n-word as part of one ritual and that he was touched inappropriately on the buttocks during another ritual in which players stripped naked in the dark.

Danvers School Superintendent Lisa Dana, who withheld the abuse allegations from the public with the school board’s backing, went on medical leave in December, less than eight weeks after the Globe first reported the system’s refusal to release results of its investigation.  Her duties have been handled by assistant superintendents Keith Taverna and Mary Wermers.

In a statement, Taverna and Wermers said, “Starting with the initial outreach to the school department, the district has been receptive to the review process initiated by the Attorney General’s office.  We have made ourselves available to answer all of their questions, we have provided all documentation that has been requested of us, and we are prepared to implement recommendations that may follow.”

Meanwhile, in a report issued Wednesday, the North Shore NAACP recommended that Stephen Baldassare, a police sergeant who was also head coach of the hockey team during the alleged misconduct, be reassigned from supervising the town’s school resource officers.

The group also called on the Danvers Police Department to improve its hiring and training, to commit to greater transparency, and to acknowledge that its role in the hockey case contributed to “undermining trust and causing fear and trauma” in the community.

NAACP branch president Natalie Bowers characterized the report as a “People’s Call for Accountability.”

“The community wants to finally heal from the racial trauma that has lingered for the last two years,” Bowers said.  “It seeks accountability so that it can rebuild trust in local governance. Danvers has much work to do.”

Bowers, however, stated in a letter Tuesday to the town’s Human Rights and Inclusion Committee that Police Chief James Lovell and Town Manager Steve Bartha have reviewed the report and acknowledged the NAACP’s concerns but “decided not to adopt our recommendations.”

Lovell, in a statement to the Globe, defended the integrity of the hockey investigation, denied the police made any attempt to cover up the allegations, and said the department has taken measures and committed to launching additional initiatives that address the NAACP’s concerns.

He also reflected on the lack of diversity in the Danvers Police Department.  The force, including the command staff, is composed of 39 officers: 36 white males and three white females.

“As a civil service community, Danvers is required to follow their guidelines in the selection process of police candidates,” Lovell said.  “A list of candidates is provided to us, upon request, by Civil Service, and we are required to hire from that list, which is developed using a variety of criteria, including exam scores, residency, veteran status, etc.”

He said the department uses various methods to screen candidates, including analyzing their responses to questions about racism, bias, and excessive use of force.

Lovell also pledged to promote racial sensitivity in part by assigning officers to attend a four-hour webinar produced by the Anti-Defamation League, titled “Fair, Equitable, and Objective Policing.”

As for removing Baldassare from his school-related assignment, the NAACP report says taking that action would demonstrate “the department is committed to improving its practices, including ensuring that those [officers] it places in critical roles in the schools have the training necessary to do the work appropriately and ensure the safety of the school community without multiple competing priorities and interests.”

Lovell and Bartha have rejected previous requests to reassign Baldassare, a former star athlete at Danvers High School who lives in town and has served on the police force since 1999.

Baldassare told police and school investigators he knew nothing about the alleged misconduct.  He has not publicly addressed the allegations.

The Globe’s efforts to reach Baldassare were unsuccessful.  In a letter to Lovell and Bartha in February, he said he wanted to retain his police assignment to help the community move forward.  The school district rehired him as the hockey coach despite the abuse allegations, but he resigned from the position before the 2021-22 season.

Baldassare wrote that he understands some people will never be satisfied that he was unaware of the alleged misconduct.  Throughout his career, he said, “serving, supporting, mentoring, coaching, and helping kids has been the driving motivator and passion in my professional life.”

On accepting a reassignment, Baldassare wrote, “The truth is this would be the easy thing to do, walking away from both the work I love and the challenges that lie ahead, but that isn’t me.”

Instead, he said, “I will ensure that our unit is a leading advocate and force for positive change within the community.”

Bowers said the NAACP and its allies plan to press the Danvers Human Rights and Inclusion Committee to support the report’s recommendations and the Select Board to help implement them.

The Last Days Of A 5-Year-Old

.jpg photo of 5-year-old Boy, who had skin breakdown or bedsores, and was tied down, or was so weak or malnourished that he was unable to move at the end of his life.
5-year-old Elijah Lewis suffered a level of abuse that went far beyond what they typically see, “It would fall into the category of torture, really.”

Medical experts say Elijah Lewis appears to have been ‘tortured’

Autopsy raises new questions about texts sent by New Hampshire child’s mother

The sores were something you’d see on someone living in a derelict nursing home — or someone held in restraints.  The malnourishment hinted at weeks, if not months, without adequate food.  And then there was the trauma to the head.

The final days of 5-year-old Elijah Lewis’s short life remain shrouded in mystery, but medical experts say the recent autopsy findings alone suggest the shaggy-haired little boy from Merrimack, N.H., suffered a level of abuse that went far beyond what they typically see.

“It’s more than just . . .  minor medical neglect,” said Alice W. Newton, medical director of the Child Protection Program at Massachusetts General Hospital.  “It would fall into the category of torture, really.”

The autopsy results also raise new questions about text messages sent by the boy’s mother, Danielle Dauphinais, 35, who is being held without bail in New Hampshire along with her boyfriend, Joseph Stapf, 30.  In the January texts sent to a friend and obtained by the Globe, Dauphinais said she argued with Stapf’s mother for giving Elijah too much food, saying “this child will eat till he pukes.”   Stapf’s mother, according to Dauphinais’s text, said it was “child abuse” to withhold food from a child.

Five-year-old Elijah Lewis had fentanyl in his system and died from violence and neglect, autopsy finds

Reached Monday, Dauphinais’s attorney, Jaye Rancourt, declined to comment on the messages, saying that “without verification that this is actually a text message from my client,  I can’t really respond.  This could be a complete fabrication.”

The texts match a detailed description of the messages given by the person who originally received them.

Questions about the circumstances of Elijah’s death have only grown since his body was discovered in the woods of Abington, Mass., on Oct. 23, following a 10-day search that included law enforcement agencies from at least five states.  Since then, authorities have released little in the way of details as they continue to investigate.  Meanwhile, relatives and people who lived near the child’s home in Merrimack say they seldom saw the boy in the months leading up to his disappearance.

The Massachusetts medical examiner’s office last month ruled the boy’s death a homicide, determining the cause to be “violence and neglect, including facial and scalp injuries, acute fentanyl intoxication, malnourishment and pressure ulcers.”  Pressure ulcers, more commonly referred to as bedsores, are typically found in bedridden people unable to change position.

But neither Dauphinais nor Stapf has been charged with murder. Instead, they are being held on charges of child endangerment and witness tampering related to their alleged attempts to mislead investigators trying to determine the boy’s whereabouts in October. Both have pleaded not guilty.

Mom accused of encouraging people to lie about whereabouts of missing 5-year-old N.H. boy, prosecutors say

It remains unclear how involved New Hampshire’s Division for Children, Youth and Families was with the boy prior to his disappearance.  The agency has declined to comment on the case, though authorities have said that DCYF initially reported the boy missing to law enforcement on Oct. 14, and Dauphinais told a friend last June that she’d been in contact with the agency.

Texts sent by Dauphinais to another friend and obtained by the Globe make it clear that she had serious concerns about her son, including the amount he ate, at least nine months before the boy was discovered missing.

In a text to a friend on Jan. 7, Dauphinais complained that Stapf’s mother, Joanne — with whom the couple shared a home — was feeding the boy against her wishes.  Dauphinais said Joanne Stapf would also “baby him and love on him” even when Elijah acted up.
“I made Elijah a decent plate of food and she insisted on giving him seconds,” Dauphinais wrote in a January text.  “I told her no because this child will eat till he pukes and then eat some more. I also told her that he’s having cake after so there is no need for seconds.”
“She said I was wrong and that was child abuse,”  Dauphinais continued.  “She said that she’s an Italian grandma and that she considers this child abuse in her family. Like wtf!”

The 5-year-old boy was found dead and his mother jailed. ‘What the hell was happening in that home?’

According to two physicians who spoke with the Globe, both of whom specialize in cases of child abuse or neglect, the details outlined in the autopsy report paint a particularly grim picture.  Though neither is involved with the case or privy to case files, both described the autopsy findings to be extreme, even within the realm of neglect cases.

“This is not like an everyday thing,” said Dr. Suzanne Haney, a Nebraska-based child abuse pediatrician who serves as the chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Child Abuse and Neglect. “This extreme of a case, fortunately, is very rare.”

Both doctors described the bedsores, in particular, as highly irregular in a developmentally normal child.  The painful, circular lesions are almost never seen in young, physically mobile patients, leading them to believe that Elijah could have been restrained in some way prior to his death.

“Skin breakdown or bedsores is not something you’d ever see in a healthy 5-year-old,” said Newton.  “That, to me, speaks to being tied down . . . or [being] so weak or malnourished that he was unable to move at the end of his life.”

Added Haney, “If you combine malnourishment and pressure ulcers, I’m thinking he was either restrained or his malnourishment was to the point where . . . he was unconscious or semiconscious for a period of time.”

Either condition would’ve been a red flag to doctors, said Newton — but it’s unclear whether Dauphinais ever took Elijah to see a physician in New Hampshire.

Born in Arizona in 2016, the boy spent much of his early life in the custody of his father following his parents’ contentious 2017 divorce.  In divorce paperwork, Timothy Lewis accused Dauphinais of being “violent and impulsive” and having a “history of domestic violence and substance abuse.”  A decree approved by the court blocked Dauphinais from spending time with her son.

Last May, however, for unclear reasons, Elijah arrived in New Hampshire to live with Dauphinais and her boyfriend, Stapf.

Though initially excited by her son’s arrival, Dauphinais, two friends said, soon became exasperated by what she described as the boy’s myriad behavioral issues.  In texts to a friend last summer, Dauphinais likened her son to a serial killer, saying she felt no connection to the child and that she wanted him “gone.”

‘I want him gone.’ Elijah Lewis’s mother messaged a friend just months before his mysterious death

One friend, Michelle O’Brien, who has known Dauphinais since both were teenagers, told the Globe she’d provided the name of a pediatrician to Dauphinais, but did not know whether she ever followed up on it.

The office of New Hampshire Attorney General John M. Formella, which is handling the case, has declined to release records of previous police visits to the home that Dauphinais and Stapf shared, though neighbors said police were a common presence at the residence, which backs up to a quiet lake.

New Hampshire Representative Kimberly Rice, who chairs the House committee on children and family law, acknowledged that the state’s child welfare agency has suffered from staffing issues that have left it hamstrung.

“I don’t think they’re doing a bad job at DCYF,” said Rice.  “We have positions that need to be filled that are funded, but the people aren’t there, and if the people aren’t there, I don’t know how you continue to hold an agency accountable when you can’t get the positions filled.”

Investigators pledge to find justice for 5-year-old boy after body found buried in Abington woods

As the criminal case moves forward, meanwhile, Moira O’Neill, director of the New Hampshire Office of the Child Advocate, said her office would be opening an investigation into the circumstances surrounding Elijah’s death.

Appointed by New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu in 2018, O’Neill provides oversight of the state’s child protection services, as well as “holding systems accountable,” according to the state website.

But with a small office currently engaged in other cases, she cautioned that the process could take up to a year to complete.

“If what’s reported in the newspapers is correct,” O’Neill said, “it does sound as though this was a preventable death.”

Unconstitutional And Illegal Vaccine Mandate

.jpg photo of american family association logoThere is no American monarchy

Abraham Hamilton III has written an excellent article regarding President Biden’s unconstitutional and illegal vaccine mandate.  It clearly outlines why American is not a monarchy and will not abide a dictatorship.

I strongly encourage you to read Abraham’s article below.

Abraham Hamilton III is general counsel for American Family Association and host of the daily radio program “The Hamilton Corner” on American Family Radio.

Sincerely,
Tim Wildmon, President
American Family Association

THERE IS NO AMERICAN MONARCHY

On September 8, 2021, Politico published an article titled “The Surprisingly Strong Supreme Court Precedent Supporting Vaccine Mandates.”  In it, the author works feverishly to project the argument that the 1905 United States Supreme Court decision against Lutheran minister Henning Jacobson and in favor of the state of Massachusetts’ compulsory vaccination mandate (concerning smallpox) provides the legal footing necessary to uphold…wait for it…a U.S. governmental COVID-19 injection mandate.

Then, almost on cue, on September 9, 2021, the J. Robinette B. Administration announced “Sweeping New Vaccine Mandates for 100 million Americans.”  Gasp!  How was Politico so prescient?  They just so happened to release their article on vaccine mandates the day before Mr. Biden announced an injection mandate.  They weren’t trying to lay the social groundwork for the White House’s executive action, were they?

We do not yet have the formal publication of the executive action.  However, according to reports (including the AP News story cited above), the federal action mandates “that all employers with more than 100 workers require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly.”  This will affect about 80 million Americans.  And,

“The roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid also will have to be fully vaccinated.”

The mandate also requires “vaccination for executive branch employees and contractors who do business with the federal government—with no option to test out.”  This includes several million more workers.  Finally,

“The requirement for large companies to mandate vaccinations or weekly testing for employees will be enacted through a forthcoming rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that carries penalties of $14,000 per violation.”

In the midst of all of this, AP News reported,

“Biden’s order for executive branch workers and contractors includes exceptions for workers seeking religious or medical exemptions from vaccination, according to press secretary Jen Psaki” (in the link cited above).

Yet, in addition to this newly announced intrusion upon the private employment sector, separately,

“[T]he Department of Health and Human Services will require vaccinations in Head Start Programs, as well as schools run by the Department of Defense and Bureau of Indian Education, affecting about 300,000 employees.”

Having said all of that, every ounce of this proposed executive action is illegal and unconstitutional.  The United States of America is a constitutional republic with representative democratic features.  Our Constitution separates power within the federal government.  In our federal executive branch, we have a president.  Not a king!  In our republican form of government, as expressed in Article IV, Section 4 of our U.S. Constitution, we enjoy the benefit of separate sovereignty.  The bulk of emergency power in our nation rests in state governmentNot in the U.S. executive branch.  A president’s role and powers are different than those charged with state governance. Article 2 of our U.S. Constitution sets the parameter, the limits, for executive power. Nowhere in it will you find any authority whatsoever for the J. Robinette B. Administration to compel private companies to force their staffs to inject their bodies with anything or to test them.  Period.

Interestingly, when you read the Jacobson v. Massachusetts, 197 U.S. 11 (1905) opinion Politico cited, you find that the opinion doesn’t support the unconstitutional authoritarian overreach proposed by the White House.  In Jacobson, the Court ruled that it is within the police power of a State to enact a compulsory vaccination law.  And it is for the legislature, and not for the courts, to determine in the first instance whether vaccination is or is not the best mode for the prevention of smallpox and the protection of the public health.  “The State” in Jacobson was the state of Massachusetts.  “The legislature” was the Massachusetts state legislature.  The federal executive branch has no legal authority to do this.  The opinion Politico tried to pass off as legal authority for a national injection mandate is clearly distinguishable from and cuts directly against what the Biden administration is trying to force on the American people.

More specifically, they seek to shove it into our bodies without our consent.  OSHA has no more authority to do this than did the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to issue an eviction moratorium.  This is why the U.S. Supreme Court struck that down too.  Which, Mr. Biden knew but sought to expand anyway, even after the Court rebuked him.  That should give you an indication of his respect, or lack thereof, for the rule of law.

We should also mention Mr. Biden’s injection mandate does not comport with the science presented in the Jacobson case.  The Jacobson Court observed that the vaccination against smallpox at issue in 1905 was promulgated to “prevent the spread of smallpox.” (Jacobson p. 31).  Many well-intentioned people may hope that currently available injections help “slow the spread” of SARS-CoV-2.  But, no one today, at least not anymore, attempts to credibly assert that the various injections prevent infection with or the transmission of SARS-CoV-2.  I recently had Dr. Christina Parks on my radio program to discuss this very thing.  You can find that program here.

She earned her Ph.D. in cellular and molecular biology from the University of Michigan. She did her graduate research in the field of cytokine signaling.  Cytokines are the chemicals the immune system uses to communicate.  During the interview, Dr. Parks referred to a study that indicated that all of the proposed injections were designed for the initial strand of SARS-CoV-2, which for all practical purposes, is no longer present.  There were not designed for the Delta Variant (or any other variants).  Recent studies, indicate that people who’ve developed natural immunity due to having had COVID-19 previously (the disease produced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus) who also receive the injection may be susceptible to greater health risk.  The combined effect of natural immunity plus the injection may be far worse than COVID-19 itself.  Dr. Parks testified about this before the Michigan state legislature.

The reality that the injections do not prevent infection or transmission of SARS-CoV-2 seems to be reflected in recent activity by the CDC.  On August 23, 2021, Pfizer received FDA approval for its Biontech injection.  On September 1, 2021, the CDC changed its definition for vaccination.  It now defines vaccination as “The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce protection from a specific disease.”  Congressman Thomas Massie of Kentucky pointed out that the CDC previously defined vaccination as “Injection of a killed or weakened infectious organism in order to prevent the disease” up until 2015. From 2015 to September 1, 2021, the CDC defined vaccination as “The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease. The CDC’s vaccination definition evolved from “prevention” to “immunity,” and now to mere “protection.”  The CDC seems to have confirmed what Dr. Parks told me (and a few of my “Corner” friends) and tacitly admitted that the injections do not prevent infection or transmission.

The national injection mandate seems to also be anti-science.  Studies like this one from Israel specifically compared the potency and durability of natural immunity to purported injection immunity.  The authors wrote that their study demonstrated “natural immunity confers longer lasting and stronger protection against infection, symptomatic disease and hospitalization caused by the Delta variant” than does the two-dose Pfizer injection (the only one with FDA approval to date).  In light of this fact, Dr. Anthony Fauci (“The boy from Brooklyn”) was specifically asked during a recent CNN appearance why Americans with natural immunity would need injections.  His response: I don’t have “a really firm answer” on that.  Seriously?  This from the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases?  If this is so, is science driving the J. Robinette B. Administration to implement a national injection mandate, or is something else dictating this decision?

Whatever the answer, this national mandate is a no-go.  It is unconstitutional.  It’s not supported jurisprudentially.  And, it does not follow the available science.  The United States of America is a constitutional republic.  We are not a monarchy and we will not abide a dictatorship.  The current administration seems to require a reminder of that fact. This abuse of executive power may be just the thing to provoke that reminder.

THE HAMILTON CORNER – Tuesday, September 28, 2021
She’s back.  Dr. Christina Parks is back in “The Corner” to discuss her concerns with this novel technology being used for vaccination.

Tell Elected Officials Stop Takeover Of Supreme Court

.jpg photo of radical left AntiAmerican Agenda
STOP these radicals from taking over the Supreme Court!

Stop These AntiAmericans From Taking
Over The Supreme Court

The radical agenda of President Joe Biden and the liberal left is very clear… they want to pack the United States Supreme Court by increasing the number of justices from nine members to 13.  Through shady legislation and unethical maneuvering, Vice President Kamala Harris, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, and other Democratic operatives will force U.S. citizens to abide by their tyrannical authority and policies.

In 1983, then-Senator Joe Biden called court-packing a “bonehead idea.”  In 2005, he said eliminating the filibuster for political convenience would gut the “core of what the Senate is about as an institution.”

But now, Biden and his far-left pals have an unquenchable thirst for power and control. And they will stop at nothing to get it.

TAKE ACTION NOW

With a rigged Court, they’ll have a majority of justices, sure to rubber-stamp radical legislation that will fundamentally change America and ravage the Constitution.

This attack on the most fundamental tenets of separation of powers in our government must be stopped.  Right now, the only thing standing between complete tyranny and freedom is the Supreme Court.

Those on the radical left who want to destroy America currently control the executive and legislative branches of government.  They must not be allowed to gain control of the judiciary.

Please, TAKE ACTION!

Contact your members of Congress now!  We have prepared an email that will be delivered directly to your representative and senators.

Our friends at First Liberty Institute have prepared a short but very concise video exposing this attempted coup of the Supreme Court.  You can watch it here.

TAKE ACTION NOW

Sincerely,
Tim Wildmon, President
American Family Association

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