Tag Archives: Cronyism

More Of Obama’s Legacy Exposed – Pt #1

Child Sex Trafficking through
Child “Protection” Services Exposed –
Kidnapping Children for Sex

“What shouldn’t be overlooked is the fact that Clinics in CA was giving prepubescent Children puberty blockers in 2015 or even before.  This is felony Child Abuse perpetrated by the whims of homosexual “parents”, and all for the purpose of “making” Child Sex Slaves.”
Robert StrongBow

In this Buzzsaw interview (below), filmmaker Sean Stone interviews Tammi Stefano, the Executive Director of The National Safe Child Coalition (NSCC), and exposes much of the corruption happening within Child Protection Services and Family Courts.  This might be one of the few interviews currently available on the Internet that gives this much information on the child sex trafficking business that exists in LA County, and across the nation.  Tammi Stefano reveals some very shocking information about the child and human trafficking business currently operating in the United States, which is a huge illegal business that brings in more money than the illegal drug trade and illegal arms trade combined.

Tammi Stefano has spent over two decades on front lines fighting for child safety. She understands the emotions of being victimized, having survived a kidnapping in her younger years.  Determination was the driving force that prompted her to go undercover to catch a pedophile school teacher.

Child Protection Services do Not Protect Children – Hundreds of Children Murdered in CPS Care

Picking up the interview at about the 9 minute mark, Stefano begins to explain that when there is an allegation of child abuse, law enforcement and child protection services (CPS) are the two entities that get involved.  According to Stefano, the social workers working in child protection services across the country do not have the training to truly investigate child abuse, because child abuse is a crime.  Stefano encourages the listeners of the program to call law enforcement, not CPS, if they encounter sexual or physical abuse of a child, because this is a crime, and CPS is not trained to handle crimes.  Stefano says:

“The minute you call child protection services, you can rest assured that the investigation will not be done properly.  Chances are the child will not be protected.”

She then gives the example of Los Angeles County, where in 2013 CPS took “thousands of children away from parents,” and that 570 children were murdered while in the care of CPS and away from their families.

Foster Children Bring in Great Profits to the State

At another point in the interview, Stefano relates how California benefits financially from having children in foster care.  She states that adults who are incarcerated in the penal system on average cost the State about $48,000.00 per prisoner.  For children taken in foster care, however, one child can bring in up to $1 million of revenue to the State.  Children who need “extra care” are given many medical treatments, such as psychotropic drugs.  (See: California’s Crisis: 1 Out of Every 4 Children in California’s Foster Care Prescribed Powerful Psychiatric Drugs)

Stefano gives one example she encountered where a Los Angeles judge sent one mom’s son to a “behavioral modification camp” because he was allegedly labeled “defiant.”  He was given electroshock treatments, and these treatments were billed to the mother at a cost of $7000.00 per week.  Stefano stated that the mother is still making payments on these “treatments,” while her son is now 23, and she still has 10 years left on her payment plan.  To this day she does not know where her child was sent for these “medical services.”

LA CPS Turning Foster Children Over to Known Sex Abuse Offenders

When Stone asked her who CPS was turning these children over to with such “gruesome” statistics, Stefano replied that what she discovered, and what the Los Angeles Times was kind enough to publish, was that 1000 “convicted sex offenders” had been given a “green light” by CPS to become “approved foster parents” just in Los Angeles County.

*An earlier version of this article incorrectly said more than 1,000 sex-offender addresses matched the addresses for foster homes and group homes.  That account was based on a summary of the report provided to journalists by the state auditor.  In reality, the sex offender matches included a wider group of state-licensed facilities, including day-care facilities for children and providers for the elderly and adults with special needs.  Additionally, the state auditor said that regulators issued 36 orders barring individuals from licensed facilities.  The true number is 31, according to the California Department of Social Services.

Liberal’s Journalism Hall Of Shame Takes Another

.jpg photo of President Trump
Liberals have lied to the American people about caged children, and they’ve deliberately misrepresented the picture of the little girl who made the cover of Time magazine.

Investigation: Obama’s People Drugged,
Force-Fed Meds to Border Kids

The journalism hall of shame keeps getting more crowded.

A blockbuster report last week by the Center for Investigative Reporting cast a glaring light on a practice of U.S. authorities forcing immigrant children who have been separated from their parents to take psychiatric medicines – and forcibly injecting them if they resisted.

But in its eagerness to damn President Donald Trump and his administration for yet another aspect of handling illegal alien minors, according to a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner, the report left out one crucial detail.

The practice began during the Obama administration, and three of the four minors who are plaintiffs in a lawsuit naming Attorney General Jeff Sessions as a defendant were actually drugged long before Trump even took the oath of office.

As reported by the Washington Examiner’s Philip Wegmann, a lengthy article published Wednesday by Reveal, a publication of the Center for Investigative Reporting, failed to note anywhere in the text that the practice of drugging illegal alien children at a Houston-area social services contractor was begun while Obama was in the White House.

“The reporting is detailed and horrific, but the story creates a fake villain,” Wegmann wrote.  “The first words of the piece are ‘President Donald Trump.’  The article blames Trump and his current zero tolerance policy on immigration for creating “a zombie army of children.”  That is misleading at best.

“Three of the four children cited in the report were drugged during the Obama administration.  According to federal court filings, only one occurred while Trump was actually president.  The other three happened in 2016.  That timing is left out of the story, which, after opening with Trump’s policies, never mentions the years of the specific incidents of mistreatment.”

“Misleading at best”?  Wegmann is being kind.

As he noted, the first three words of the piece are “President Donald Trump.”  The piece was published in the middle of a nationwide hysteria over the status of children of illegal aliens who have been separated from their parents.  The wrong conclusion is obviously easy to draw — intentionally easy, apparently.

Only a reader willing to dig into the lawsuit filings that are linked to the article would have a clue that the practice is not some monstrosity cooked up by the administration of the man who’s now holds the presidency.

There is one hint in the article that the contractor – the Shiloh Treatment Center – had a history of problems that predate the Trump administration.  Namely, U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee had been calling for the center to be closed as early as 2014. (This might be the first and only time the regrettable Rep. Lee might not have been utterly wrong about something.)

But the editors of the ironically named Reveal had to know that the percentage of readers willing to read into the actual court filings linked with the article would be vanishingly small.  Likewise, the offhand reference to Lee doesn’t so much establish a time frame for problems at the center as emphasize the false impression that Democrats are the party that actually cares about children.

It looks like there’s more than “misleading” that’s happening here.  It looks a lot like a deliberate deception, a slight of journalistic hand that pretends to “reveal” some fact when conveying an idea that’s completely different from reality.

But what is absolutely clear is depth to which anti-Trump journalists are willing to go to smear the administration with loosely presented facts.

Given the hoaxes that have already been perpetrated surrounding the story of the “separated families” there’s no denying what’s happening.

Liberals have lied to the American people about caged children (using pictures taken during the Obama administration or outright staged for propaganda purposes). They’ve deliberately misrepresented the picture of the little girl who made the cover of Time magazine.

Major media (including USA Today) picked up a story about 1,450 children allegedly “lost” by the Trump administration when it wasn’t true.

And these are just a few of the examples.

The “Russian collusion” coverage has been skewed and tainted, but for sheer, outrageous misstatements and half-truths, it’s doubtful the country has seen distortion like this from the media since the “hands up, don’t shoot” lies of the Ferguson, Missouri, demonstrations turned into a national movement by Black Lives Matter thugs.

But the truth will come out eventually.  And it’s going to hurt the liberal media more than it hurts the rest of the country.

Until then, the journalism hall of shame is just going to keep getting bigger.

Who Is Lobbying Against NY Extending The SOL

.jpg photo of court room graphic for opening the statute of limitations for child sex abuse
The New York State Legislature is considering extending the statute of limitations on child sex crimes.

NYS Exposed: Who’s opposed to giving
Child Sex Abuse victims more time to
file lawsuits?

Rochester, NY  –  Should victims of child sex abuse be able to sue their abusers decades later?

The New York State Legislature is considering extending the statute of limitations on child sex crimes but there are some big organizations spending thousands of dollars to fight it.

Currently, someone who is sexually abused as a child has until the age of 23 to press criminal charges against his or her abuser.  Under the proposed legislation, a victim would have until his 28th birthday to file criminal charges and his 50th birthday to file civil charges.

At the age of 13, a family member shattered Melanie Blow’s trust, “one day he pulled me aside, he sexually assaulted me and I mean… inside my world changed, outside, I didn’t dare tell anybody,” she recalled.  The abuse continued and so did her silence until a decade later when she realized her abuser had done the same thing to other children.

“It never occurred to me that he was going to do this to someone else,” she said.

Since then, she’s been pushing for changes that would allow victims more time to come to terms with their abuse and seek justice.

“When children are victimized sexually in their early years, they very often don’t have the ability to intellectually or developmentally understand what’s happened to them,” said Deb Rosen, the Executive Director of the Bivona Child Advocacy Center.

That’s why many states have done away with statutes of limitations or have significantly extended them.

“New York State is truly out-of-step with the rest of the country in this area,” Rosen added.

It seems there is widespread support in Albany when it comes to giving victims more time to press criminal charges and file civil suits but the legislation also includes a one-year “look-back” for civil cases and that is the sticking point. During that window, anyone, abused at any time could sue.

“You go generations, somebody could stake a claim from something that happened 30, 40, 50 years ago and there’s no one to defend against those particular allegations,” said New York State Senator Patrick Gallivan of Elma.

Who seems most concerned about that?  Not the alleged abusers but their possible former places of employment.  News10NBC pulled lobbying records that show some of the very groups who are supposed to protect children, have spent money urging lawmakers not to pass this legislation.  The list includes public and private schools and teachers, the Boy Scouts of America, the Catholic Church and insurance companies.

“At this point, I feel that it only right to explain one very important point, and give you, Our Readers, the stats.  When a Child says they have been molested, you had better listen, because it is unsubstantiated less than 2% of the time. However, when The Clergy has been named, it is unsubstantiated over 60% of the time, although these men’s testimony is ruined forever.  Just so everyone knows, Law Enforcement does all of this type investigations.”
Robert StrongBow

In fact, following a meeting with Governor Andrew Cuomo about the Child Victims Act in March, the Archbishop of New York, Cardinal Timothy Dolan is quoted as saying “a look-back would be toxic for us….  We find it to be very strangling because we, unfortunately, have a precedent when that happens, the only organization that is targeted is the Catholic church.”

There’s also some concern from lawmakers that a look-back could flood the court system with thousands of civil cases.  The State of California recently passed legislation that included a look-back window; so far, about 1,200 claims have been filed.

When asked if he thought the legislation would pass if the look-back window wasn’t included, Senator Gallivan told News10NBC, “the best way that I can say is this is now being talked about more than I’ve ever heard it talked about in the past and I think the momentum is there for something to get done.”

Melanie said, the least state lawmakers can do is let victims have their day in court.

“It’s really hard to take a case forward when it’s happening right now.  It’s much harder to take it forward when it happened decades ago but it can happen and all victims are asking for is the right to try,” she told News10NBC.

The Real Slavers: Yankee Teachers – Pt#4 of 4

.jpg photo of Child Sex Abuse graphic
It’s legal for a teacher to have sex with a high school student in some states

PROTECTED BY CRONYS AND SOLs

Across region, outdated Sex Abuse laws have
loopholes

Statutes of limitations bottle up information about who the perpetrators are and which institutions are covering up the incidents…

BOSTON, MA  –  Licensure

Public school teachers are generally required to be licensed, allowing the state to investigate complaints of misconduct and ban educators who are found guilty.  Some experts say private school teachers should be licensed or registered with states as well.

Connecticut

Private school teachers are generally not required to be licensed.

Maine

Private school teachers are not required to be licensed if the school is accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

Massachusetts

Private school teachers are generally not required to be licensed.

New Hampshire

Private school teachers are generally not required to be licensed.

Rhode Island

Private school teachers are generally not required to be licensed.

Vermont

Private school teachers are generally not required to be licensed.

Privacy Laws

Some states have privacy laws that discourage schools from warning other schools about teachers who have been fired for misconduct.  In addition, most states allow schools to reach confidential settlements that can keep incidents secret.  Some advocates are urging states to pass laws banning confidentiality pacts and requiring schools to disclose misconduct to other schools.

Connecticut

The state recently passed a law barring public schools from signing confidentiality agreements that would suppress information about sexual misconduct by staff members.  The law also requires educators, when they are seeking new jobs, to provide a list of past employers and give those employers permission to disclose any information about past misconduct.  But the provisions only apply to public schools, not private schools.  And a separate law bars employers from disclosing personnel information without written permission from the worker.

Maine

There is no legal requirement for schools to warn other institutions when a worker who has been accused of sexual abuse applies for jobs elsewhere.  Nor is there any law barring schools from signing confidentiality agreements to resolve allegations of sexual abuse.

Massachusetts

There is no legal requirement for schools to warn other institutions when a worker who has been accused of sexual abuse applies for jobs elsewhere.  Nor is there any law barring schools from signing confidentiality agreements to resolve allegations of sexual abuse.

New Hampshire

There is no legal requirement for schools to warn other institutions when a worker who has been accused of sexual abuse applies for jobs elsewhere.  Nor is there any law barring schools from signing confidentiality agreements to resolve allegations of sexual abuse.

Rhode Island

There is no legal requirement for schools to warn other institutions when a worker who has been accused of sexual abuse applies for jobs elsewhere.  Nor is there any law barring schools from signing confidentiality agreements to resolve allegations of sexual abuse.

Vermont

There is no legal requirement for schools to warn other institutions when a worker who has been accused of sexual abuse applies for jobs elsewhere.  Nor is there any law barring schools from signing confidentiality agreements to resolve allegations of sexual abuse.

Mandatory Reporting

States generally require certain professionals, including educators, to report cases of child abuse to state welfare officials.  But some advocates say the laws do not always include tough enough penalties or rigorous enforcement.

Connecticut

If educators fail to report sexual abuse of a student by a school employee, they could face a fine of up to $500.  The state has prosecuted a number of people for violating the mandatory reporting law in recent years.

Maine

If educators fail to report abuse of a child, they could face a fine of up to $500.  State and county officials could not identify any examples where educators have been prosecuted for violating the mandatory reporting law.

Massachusetts

If educators fail to report abuse of a child under 18, they could face a fine of $1,000 (or criminal charges in the event of the child dies from the abuse).  At least a half-dozen school officials have been charged for violating the law in the past three decades.

New Hampshire

If school officials fail to report sex abuse or child abuse, they could face a fine of up to $1,000 and up to a year in prison.  The state could not provide any examples of cases where schools or administrators have been criminally prosecuted for violating the law.

Rhode Island

If people fail to report abuse of a child under 18 within 24 hours, they could be charged with a misdemeanor, facing up to a year in prison and a $500 fine.  Until recently, some argued the law did not cover sex abuse by school officials – only abuse by parents and guardians – but the legislature recently amended the law to eliminate that concern.  State law also requires any person to notify police when they witness an assault or attempted assault.

Vermont

If educators fail to report abuse of a child under 18, they could face a fine of $500.  If there is an “intent to conceal abuse or neglect,” it could result in up to six months of imprisonment or a fine up to $1,000.  There have been criminal charges filed at least twice against school officials for failing to report an incident.

The Real Slavers: Yankee Teachers – Pt#3 of 4

.jpg photo of Child Sex Abuse graphic
It’s legal for a teacher to have sex with a high school student in some states

PROTECTED BY CRONYS AND SOLs

Across region, outdated Sex Abuse laws have
loopholes

Statutes of limitations bottle up information about who the perpetrators are and which institutions are covering up the incidents…

BOSTON, MA  –  LAWS RELATED TO SEXUAL MISCONDUCT BY EDUCATORS

Child welfare advocates are pushing for changes in a number of areas to discourage educators from abusing students and then continuing to work with children.

Age Of Consent

The age of consent, typically 16 to 18, is the age at which a person is able to legally consent to sexual activity.  But many advocates argue educators should not be able to have sex with high school students of any age.

Connecticut

The age of consent in Connecticut is generally 16, but K-12 school employees are barred from having sex with students who attend the same school, regardless of the student’s age.

Maine

The age of consent in Maine is generally 16, but it is a crime for K-12 educators to have sex with their students, regardless of the age.

Massachusetts

The age of consent in Massachusetts is generally 16, even in cases involving school employees.

New Hampshire

The age of consent in New Hampshire is generally 16.  But people are also barred from using an authority position to coerce a child under 18 into having sex.

Rhode Island

The age of consent in Rhode Island is generally 16, even in cases involving school employees.

Vermont

The age of consent in Vermont is generally 16, but increases to 18 for certain cases in which the offender is in an authority position over the teenager.

Statutes Of Limitations

States typically set a deadline for filing a civil lawsuit or criminal charges.  But advocates say the deadlines pose problems for children who were victims of sex abuse because it can often take them decades to come forward.

Connecticut

Victims who were sexually abused as children must generally file civil suits before they turn 48 (unless the defendant was convicted of first degree sexual assault for the crime).  There is no criminal statute of limitations for prosecuting class A felonies, such as aggravated sexual assault of a minor.  However, lesser offenses must normally be filed by the time the victim turns 48 or five years from the date the incident is reported to police, whichever is earlier. Tighter deadlines may apply to offenses committed before May 23, 2002, when the law was changed.

Maine

There is no statute of limitations for abused children to sue either the perpetrator or employer.  There is currently no criminal statute of limitations for sex offenses involving victims under 16 (though the deadline may have already passed for some offenses before the law was amended in the 1990s).  Sex offenses involving victims 16 or older must generally be prosecuted within three to six years.

Massachusetts

Victims who were sexually abused as children must generally file civil suits within 35 years after they become adults (by age 53) or within seven years after discovering the harm the abuse inflicted, whichever is later.  There is no blanket statute of limitations for criminal prosecuting defendants for sex crimes involving children under 16, but independent corroborating evidence is needed for incidents that happened at least 27 years ago.  Tighter deadlines may apply to offenses that occurred prior to Dec. 20, 2006, when the criminal statute of limitations was last changed.

New Hampshire

Victims of sex abuse as children must generally sue perpetrators or employees by the time they turn 30 or within three years after they discover the harm the incident caused, whichever is later. Prosecutors can seek criminal charges for sexual assault against children so long as the victims are under 40.  Note: In some cases, different deadlines may apply to older incidents that occurred before the current statutes of limitations were put in place.

Rhode Island

Victims who were sexually abused as children must generally file civil lawsuits against the perpetrators within seven years after they become adults (25) or within seven years after discovering the harm the abuse caused.  Victims must generally sue employers within three years after they become adults (21).  There is no criminal statute of limitations for many sex crimes, including rape, first degree sexual assault, and child molestation sexual assault.

Vermont

Victims who were sexually abused as children must generally file civil suits by the time they turn 24 (or six years from the date they discovered the harm from the abuse, whichever is later).  There is no criminal statute of limitations for aggravated sex assault on a child; some other crimes must be filed within 40 years.  However, the statute of limitations may have already expired for some offenses, before the law was changed three years ago.