Tag Archives: Dangerous Environment

Do You Let People In Your House Without Asking

.jpg photo of Good Parents and Junior
AH, come on Dad, I can get my own fish, please Dad please, let me go with you…

ATTENTION:  One by one, your accounts
are being hacked due to poor security

DO YOU WANT TO STOP THIS BEFORE IT HAPPENS TO YOU????

#1 – DO NOT LEAVE ANY EMAIL IN YOUR ACCOUNT FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME THAT YOU DO NOT KNOW WHO IT IS FROM PERSONALLY!!!!  DO NOT JUST DELETE IT, MARK IT AS “SPAM“, AND WHEN ASKED, REPLY “YES, REPORT THIS”.

#2 – Start keeping your email account as near EMPTY AS POSSIBLE, this is not always people from another country… If there is any doubt about what I mean by this, just ask me privately.

#3 – Change your password NOW!!!!  Then, make your new password unique, at least 12 – 15 characters long, with a mixture of caps, little letters, numbers, and symbols.

#4 – TURN ON TWO (2) STEP VERIFICATION, AND USE IT EVERYTIME.

#5 – When you see a friend wanting to be your “Friend” on Facebook, get a screenshot if at all possible, and TELL YOUR FRIEND IMMEDIATELY!!!!  Then, contact FB Support IMMEDIATELY!!!!  FB Messenger is very vulnerable due to users being complacent about security.

#6 – Get a top-of-the-line Security Suite, NOT A FREE ONE.  Your family is worth it, and you will sleep better.  My Security Suite covers 5 devices, and my Wi-Fi.  Then set your “HOME” network as “PRIVATE” not “PUBLIC”.   Use a “PUBLIC” Wi-Fi as little as possible, and then, only if you have a very good Securiy Suite.  NOTE:  Children should not be allowed to use a “PUBLIC” Wi-Fi.  It is a Parent’s job to supervise their Children 24/7, and teach them the proper, secure way in our digital world.

#7 – I also utilize a top-of-the-line VPN, I suggest you all do also.  Once again, your family is worth it, and you will sleep better.

#8 – This is not the end of everything I could bring up, like apps for children’s devices, or not putting your families info on a page for the world to see, and certainly not posting pictures of your family or even your children.  HOWEVER do not post less than fully dressed pictures of children!!!!

#9 – NOW, last but not least, how do you find out if your lack of proper security has set you and your family up for, at the very least, mental abuse…. or possibly a site did not do their job of making sure your data was secure????  These money people are getting off with symbolic slaps on the hand for BEING COMPLACENT WITH YOUR DATA!!!!  I have just what you all need to find out if your email address has been compromised, AND you can setup notifications for future breaches.

have i been pwned?

O.U.R. Response To New York Times

Operation Underground Railroad Logo
Operation Underground Railroad

The New York Times Misses the Point:
Not Preventing Children from Being
Sexually Victimized Would be the Real
Misservice to Society

At Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.), we are extremely proud to play a small part in helping to protect our society’s largest silent political constituency—the children.

A just published New York Times magazine piece raised the issue of whether one law enforcement program trying to address the problem of child exploitation, OperationNet Nanny” in Washington State, is the right approach to apprehending would-be child sexual predators.

The Times’ reporting questions whether hundreds of perpetrators, particularly some young men in their 20s, who have been identified, arrested, and successfully prosecuted for taking part in online “Net Nanny” sting operations, are being unfairly targeted and too harshly punished.

Following our mission to help protect children from sexual exploitation, our organization has become a strong supporter of Operation “Net Nanny,” a preventative-minded child protection initiative the New York Times acknowledges has a 95% conviction rate in hundreds of cases that have gone to trial.  O.U.R. is proud to back this effort and others that help prevent children from being sexually victimized in the first place.

The select cases highlighted by the New York Times (out of hundreds) were largely those of young men in their 20s with no prior criminal records.  The Times chose to only mention in passing that “some caught in stings are violent predators.”  This included 60-year-old Curtis Pouncy, whom the Times noted has “a history of brutal sex crimes” that “included raping a 13-year-old girl he picked up from a bus station as well as a 19-year-old at knife point.”  Pouncy was arrested in a Washington State “Net Nanny” operation while on supervised release in early 2019.  He is now serving life in prison.

One of the hundreds of cases the Times did not highlight was that of Bryan Earle Glant, 24, of Seattle.  Glant, a well-resourced young man, was tried, convicted, and sentenced to nine years in prison on two counts of attempted first-degree rape of a child.  Emails and text messages contained in his court record show Glant arranging through online communication to meet “Hannah,” a police officer posing as a mother, to engage in sex acts with her two daughters, ages 6 and 11.  Glant did not just discuss doing something online.  His messages were not the mere unguided explorations of a young man.  No.  He acted, showing up at the agreed location with lubricant in his pocket.

Imagine if police and their Net Nanny operation were not on the other side of the door that day.  How would the lives of those 6- and 11-year-old children have been different?

At his trial and on appeal, Glant unsuccessfully tried to argue that O.U.R.’s support of the “Net Nanny” program was “outrageous government conduct.”  We were pleased that the court rightfully dismissed those claims.  We are also pleased the court reaffirmed our lawful ability and efforts to provide tools and resources to help law enforcement agencies get those who chose to prey on our children off our streets.

The New York Times led readers to believe that there were “no victims” in “Net Nanny” cases.  This is not factual.  “Net Nanny” cases did result in the rescuing of actual victims.  While the “Net Nanny” arrests of perpetrators did not involve physical contact with a child, in several cases victims of those arrested came forward or the Washington State Police found evidence where the predators did sexually abuse a minor.  The majority of victims who came forward in “Net Nanny” cases were under the age of 11.

Throughout the life of the “Net Nanny” program, law enforcement involved in its supervised multi-jurisdictional operations followed protocols—and the judicial system agreed, clearly finding there was no entrapment under long-standing and tested legal standards.

How the judicial system decides to serve justice on those lawfully charged with violating the law is an issue left for each state to determine, including the severity of sentencing for convicted child sex offenders.

In the end, keeping child predators off the street is paramount, and we will always support law enforcement in their legal efforts to protect children, hopefully before they are preyed upon.

We believe among the best tactics in the fight to bring child sex exploiters, propagators, and abusers to justice is supporting and helping arm the good guys with better technology and expertise.  Domestically, this involves public/private partnerships that help support the nation’s law enforcement officers and prosecutors at the federal, state, and local levels in their important work by providing technology, software, expertise, and training where taxpayer budgets fall short.

This also involves sharing the latest intelligence we glean through legally authorized work O.U.R. does internationally with law enforcement, NGOs, and governments to help rescue victims of child sex exploitation, abuse, and trafficking.  To date, O.U.R. has assisted in the rescue of more than 4,000 victims globally since our first international operation in 2014.

Since our founding, O.U.R. has always worked hand in hand with law enforcement in the U.S. and abroad, and we will continue to do so, helping to provide the necessary ammunition so they are well-armed and equipped to stop predatory trollers seeking their next child victim.

Our team is composed of top former federal, state, and local law enforcement professionals experienced in child exploitation, trafficking, and digital world policing.  One of our newest team members is the former head of the Washington State PatrolNet Nanny program, Carlos Rodriguez, who joined O.U.R. this year following a distinguished 27-year law enforcement career.

We are honored to have Carlos on our team now.  Together with professionals at all levels of the public and private sectors, we can pool our knowledge, resources, and collective passion to protect children at home and abroad to make sure shrinking budgets never deter anyone from the ultimate goal: safeguarding innocent children and bringing guilty perpetrators who seek to prey on them to justice.

Law enforcement and child protection advocacy groups have done unheralded yeoman’s work in the past 20 years to strengthen efforts to combat the unconscionable exploitation of children.  But there remains so much more that must be done.

Today, the sad truth is this:  we still do not know the full extent of the enticement, exploitation, and in far too many instances, the sexual assault, of children.  In the U.S., the most developed nation in the world, the country’s leading measure of criminal victimization—the National Crime Victimization Survey—still does not measure crimes against children under 12.

Those who want to underestimate scale of the problem or claim to know with certainty who is motivated to criminally victimize a child in the many forms it takes are not being truthful.  We simply don’t know.

What we do know with certainty is that with each passing day, our children are becoming even more dependent on the Internet and increasingly engaged in the exploration of online and digital virtual worlds, even more so in the present moment with millions still staying home because of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Honestly ask yourself this question—in the world we live in today, do we want law enforcement to have more resources, tools, and public and private support to combat child exploitation and abuse, or not? 

So You Are Expecting A Baby

.jpg photo of Good Parenting graphic
Your child deserves good parents.

Baby Proofing Essentials

Start Early

It may seem odd to baby-proof your home when your infant can’t even roll over yet, but you may be surprised at how soon he’ll be getting around and getting into things.   So it’s never too soon.  Take the time to baby-proof when your little one is still brand new or even before he arrives.

Tie It Down

Time to secure your TVs and furniture — just in case.  Use furniture straps to hold TVs, bookshelves, dressers, and other heavy furniture in place in any rooms where your child might be left alone, even for a minute.  Don’t put a TV on top of a dresser — the drawers can be used for climbing.  Put corner or edge bumpers on any furniture with sharp edges.

Potty Precautions

You might not see your toilet as a hazard, but the water in it, and the toilet lid, can be a danger for a curious child.  So prevent any problems: Remember to always keep toilet lids down and secured with a lid lock.

Control Your Cords

Use cord holders to keep longer cords fastened against walls.  That way, your little one can’t tug on a tangle of computer cords and other electrical wiring.  That could keep your baby safe from electrical hazards or heavy equipment that falls after a couple of tiny tugs.

Give Baby a Safe Night’s Sleep

Make sure your baby’s crib has fixed rails.  Or if you must use an older crib, don’t use the drop-side rail, or get an immobilizer for it.  (Cribs with drop-side rails are banned.)  Test the crib to make sure your baby can’t fit his head between the slats.  If you can slide a soda can between the slats, they’re too wide.  Always keep soft items like blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, and bumpers out of your baby’s sleep space.

Manage Your Medication

Store all medicines in a high, locked cabinet.  Never take medicine out of its original childproof container.  Try not to take medicine in front of your child or he may want to imitate you.  Never call medicine “candy.”  And don’t flush old pills down the toilet. Get rid of them through your local drug take-back program, or put them in a sealed bag with something your child won’t want to eat — like kitty litter or coffee grounds — and throw it in the trash.

Blind Danger

Tie all blind cords high out of reach, or cut the ends and attach breakaway safety tassels.  Never put a crib or child’s bed near window blinds or drapes.  Those dangling cords can be a choking risk.

Prevent Shocks

Put outlet covers on all exposed electrical sockets to keep your little one from getting an electric shock.  Some small outlet covers can be a choking hazard if a baby or toddler pries them out of the wall.  Look for “childproof” covers that require two hands to remove or cover plates that screw on.  For double protection, place large furniture in front of outlets.

When It’s Time for a Change

You’ll probably be surprised at how fast your baby learns to roll over — and the changing table becomes a falling hazard.  Be sure your changing table has safety straps and always buckle up when diapering your child.  Don’t ever leave baby alone on the table.  Plan ahead and have all the items you need — diapers, wipes, baby cream, nail clippers, and a small toy — handy before you start to change the baby.

Lock It Up

Protect curious kids from household cleaners and other chemicals by storing those items in locked cabinets or installing safety latches that lock when you close the cabinet door.  Do the same for any low cupboards that contain risky items like small appliances.  For added safety, store hazardous items up high and far away from small fingers.

Safety in the Car

Keep your baby safe in your car, too — in a rear-facing car seat until he’s 2.  Don’t use a car seat if you don’t know its history.  It may have been involved in a car crash or it may be past its expiration date.  Avoid a used car seat that looks damaged or is missing parts or the instructions.  Avoid recalled models, too.  You can find out more about car seat safety from the manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (http://www.safercar.gov).

Tub Time

Make tub time fun, but safe, for your little one.  Prevent scalding by adjusting your hot water heater so that the water is no hotter than 120 degrees.  Install no-slip strips on the bottom of your tub and a soft cover on the faucet to protect tender heads.  Most important, never leave your baby or toddler alone in the tub, even for a moment.

Limit Baby’s Movement

If there are some rooms you don’t want to baby proof, use baby gates to keep your little one from getting into them.  Also install gates at the top and bottom of the stairs beforeyour baby gets mobile.  Don’t use accordion-style gates, which could trap the baby’s head.  Look for gates that attach securely to the wall but won’t pinch small fingers.

Prevent Window Falls

Place your child’s crib and other furniture away from windows.  Don’t rely on standard window screens — they’re meant to keep insects out, not children in. Instead, install childproof screens, or even better, window guards, which are proven to prevent falls.

Around Pools and Water Features

Take steps to safeguard areas around pools, hot tubs, and other home features with standing water, like fish tanks and ponds.  Backyard pools should be completely surrounded by a 4-foot fence, preferably with a self-latching gate.  Pool covers and alarms may provide additional protection.  Don’t leave toys floating in pools.  And just like in the tub, never take your eyes off a child near water.

Practice Toy Safety

Baby toys should be safe for babies.  Your child’s toys should be much larger than his mouth, to prevent choking.  Check that all the parts attached to a toy — like doll eyes or teddy bear bows — are securely fastened and can’t be torn off.  Remove mobiles attached to a crib as soon as your baby can push up on his hands and knees.

Unplug Appliances

You may leave appliances such as the toaster, coffee maker, or paper shredder plugged in for convenience.  But some appliances can harm your child if she turns them on, pulls them down on her, or gets tangled in a cord.  Unplug them when you’re not using them and put them away, out of reach, if you can.

Alarms

Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are essential to your family’s safety.  Install a smoke alarm outside every bedroom or sleeping area, and make sure there’s at least one on every floor.  Don’t put smoke detectors near the kitchen or bathroom — these areas can trigger false alarms that may leave you inclined to ignore them.  Check the batteries every month.

Choose a Safer Toy Box

Choose a toy box with a safe design.  Avoid containers with hinged lids that slam down.  You want one with a light, removable lid or one that slides.  If yours has a hinged top, make sure it has a lid support that can prop the lid open.  Pick a toy box with ventilation holes or a gap beneath the lid — in case a kid climbs in.

Get Your Child’s Point of View

The best way to baby proof is to see things the way your baby does.  Get down on your hands and knees and crawl around.  What’s at baby’s eye level and within easy reach?  Kids can be curious about anything they see, like computer cords and glassware on low shelves.  You might not notice breakable or hazardous items when you’re towering above them.

Resource: WebMD.com
Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on September 27, 2019

CO Day Care Owner Facing Charges

.jpg photo of day Care owner facing charges for exceeding limit on children allowed in care
Carla Faith of Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Day care owner charged with Child
Abuse after allegedly hiding 26 children
behind false wall

Colorado Springs, CO  –  Earlier this week, Colorado Springs, Colorado, day care owner Carla Faith, 58, was charged with child abuse and attempt to influence a public servant after 26 toddlers were found behind a false wall at Faith’s day care facility last month.

The day care attached as a secondary building from Faith’s home underwent a welfare check on Nov. 13 when authorities came across two adults and more than 20 children under the age of three.  The search began after a series of complaints that Faith “was housing more children in their care than their licensed allowed,” the City of Colorado Springs said in a statement.

Colorado Springs officer Janel Langdon-Issac discovered the children and two adults in the basement of Faith’s home after hearing children’s music, despite Faith denying of having a lower ground floor, according to ABC affiliate KRDO.

During the search, Officer Jordan Parker bumped into a wall and felt it move, KRDO reported.  When Officer Parker pushed against the wall, authorities discovered a stairwell leading to a finished basement area.

“I spend a minute or two in my car with a tear in my eye because I’m trusting somebody else,” said Ethan Steinberg, an uncle of an enrolled child, in an interview with KRDO. “  It took about an hour until [police] realized where the kids were and that breaks my heart because I don’t know if my niece was down there.”

KRDO also reports that Faith was caught in a similar situation during the late ’90s but in California.

“It’s just not something that’s part of our application process, nor do we really have the authority to require that information,” said Erin Mewhinney, the Division Director Of Early Childhood Care and Learning, in an interview with KRDO.  “We’re working with the state board of human services to allow the department the authority to require child abuse and neglect records from other states of an applicant is coming in from another state.”

Faith’s day care license only permitted her to care for up to six children between the ages of zero and 13, more specifically, only two of these children could be under the age of two, according to an affidavit obtained by KRDO.

“It’s so hard to trust your children with people and we felt we could really trust them,” said parent Jeanette Conde to KRDO.  “ I’m completely betrayed, every parent that I’ve talked to, we all feel completely betrayed.”

Jury Starts Deliberations In Davis Trial

.jpg photo of man on trial for felony child abuse
Kenneth R. Davis, 31, of Springfield Missouri

Dismissed jurors discuss Kenneth Robert Davis’ felony Child Abuse case

GREENE COUNTY, MO  –  A Greene County jury is deliberating the fate of an accused child abuser.

Robert Davis is charged with 7 felonies for brutally beating and torturing his then, 8 year-old daughter last year.

Attorneys for both sides stated their cases to the jury one last time Thursday morning.

The prosecution declares that Davis severely beat his daughter and that they proved their case beyond a reasonable doubt.

The defense argued that the state tried to make Davis look bad.   They insist that he did not abuse her.

We spoke to two alternate jurors after they were dismissed from the case.

“I felt like I’d ran a race and never got to cross the finish line.  I feel glad because I don’t have to be a part of it but I also wish I was able to finish out what we started.  I think he was, can I say, a big fat liar?  I thought he was a big fat liar,” said Julie Kennedy.

Heather Hutson was also dismissed from the case.

She said, “The defense just seemed kind of almost lost.  They weren’t really sure where to go.  This guy was guilty.  The defense didn’t seem to put up too much of a fight.  There was nothing to prove his innocence or to defend his innocence I should say.”

Davis is also charged in the beating death of two year-old Kinzlea Kilgore.

He’ll be in front of a Dallas County, Missouri judge for that case next week.