Tag Archives: Domestic Violence

Animal -A Man That Hits a Woman and a child

.jpg photo of domestic violence graphicI saw this and it made my blood boil, but there was no way that I could resist sharing this.  We are at a point in time on this earth where there is quiet a few people that thinks it’s cool, or acceptable, to terrorize and/or hurt the weakest members of society.  I’m talking about our Elders, women, or children.

You know the funny thing is that actually, there is no animal on this earth that just inflicts pain on another creature just to terrorize , in fact all I know of only hunt and kill just for food.  So if I would have put that H1 up there, I would have said “Lower Than A Gutless Sewer Rat”.

How can anyone think it is funny to Bully someone until they consider suicide????  Well I want you to know that I don’t turn my head away, and from what I can see from this other good man named Robert, who just happens to be from Australia, and he’s the writer of this post that I shared, I don’t much think he likes it too much for people to hurt women, children, or our elders.

I think you get my meaning, so at this time I’m proud to introduce Mr. ROBERT SHERRIFF, who really is from Australia,

via Animal -A Man That Hits a Woman and a child

Domestic Violence Big Part Of Utah Child Abuse Case

.jpg photo of man that made death threats toward child to mother
Daniel Mercer, 28

Utah couple charged with child abuse
after 3-month-old girl suffers broken bones, brain bleeding and severe burns

SPANISH FORK, UT  –  A Spanish Fork couple was charged Friday after their three-month-old child was taken to the hospital with bad burns on her body, and other injuries consistent with child abuse, investigators said.

According to a probable cause statement released by the Utah County Sheriff’s Office, officers were contacted by the Department of Child & Family Services to investigate an aggravated child abuse case involving a three-month-old girl.

Investigators went to the University of Utah, where doctors said the baby had second-degree burns on her hand, two broken bones, brain bleeding consistent with shaken baby syndrome and a possible detached retina in her eye.

Doctors determined that the injuries the baby sustained were inflicted over the course of two weeks prior to her being admitted to the hospital, the statement said.

.jpg photo of abused child's mother
Whitney Huber, 30

The parents, identified as Whitney Huber, 30, and Daniel Mercer, 28, spoke with police about the incident, according to court documents.

After being interviewed by police, Mercer admitted to “recklessly causing the burns to his infant daughter’s left hand.”

“Daniel admitted to making death threats to the child and telling Huber when they fought on two recent occasions that he would, ‘kill the baby and make her watch as the baby died.’” the statement said.

Neither Huber or Mercer would tell police how the infant sustained the other injuries doctors said she had, police stated.

Mercer was charged Friday with two counts of child abuse – inflict serious physical injury intentionally, both second-degree felonies, possession of a controlled substance, a class-A misdemeanor and use or possession of drug paraphernalia, a class-B misdemeanor.

Huber was charged one count of child abuse, inflict serious physical injury recklessly, a third-degree felony.

Support is available 24/7 in Utah for those dealing with domestic violence.  Visit the Utah Domestic Violence Coalition online or call 1-800-897-5465 for resources and assistance.  In an emergency, dial 911.

No One In Harms Way

.jpg photo of Fort Hood Deputy Commander signing anti-child abuse proclamation
Fort Hood Deputy Commander Maj. Gen. JT Thomson as he signed the proclamation to stomp out child abuse.

Proclamation signed to denounce Child Abuse

Fort Hood leaders and community members gathered for the 2018 Fort Hood Child Abuse Prevention Month and Month of the Military Child proclamation signing ceremony at the III Corps Headquarters Tuesday.

The ceremony honored military children, raised awareness of child abuse and its long-term effects and recognized military and civilian leaders who contribute to child safety.

“We want to celebrate our military children and celebrate the necessity for their safety and well-being,” Billy Floyd, Fort Hood Family Advocacy program manager, said.  “We want to make sure that the community does not forget that all children deserve the right to be safe and to be protected.”

Organizations that prioritize child safety such as law enforcement units, Child Protective Services, Communities in Schools and counsel personnel attended the event.

Floyd pointed out that sometimes parents argue and don’t consider the serious effects it could have on children.

“We have to be cautious of that and model how to manage conflict,” Floyd said. “How to agree to disagree.  We all have stressors, but how do you manage your situation so that no one is in harm’s way?  That is the biggest key.”

Mayuana Hutt, the guest speaker for the event, experienced the effects of living in a home with domestic abuse, first hand.

“I was born to two young individuals that were in a long on-going volatile relationship,” Hutt said.  “Most children’s earliest moments don’t involve high-speed chases on the highway or violent late night encounters, but for me, these are the memories I have of my parents.”

Hutt revealed to the crowd of approximately 100 attendees that she still remembers the night when her father would hold a knife to her mother’s throat and held her mother at gunpoint for long periods of time.

“Individuals in chaotic situations don’t always think of how the situation affects their child,” Hutt said.  “I can still picture those days like they were yesterday.”

Hutt’s mother, Drenda Williams stood on the side lines to support her daughter through the difficult speech.

“I didn’t know that being a survivor, how much it affected her until we actually talked about it,” Williams said.  “It kind of made me take a step back and see how my actions affected her and make sure that she has healed from that situation as well.”

Fort Hood police officer Lt. Andrew Samarripa beelined toward Hutt after the ceremony to commend her for her courageous speech.

“The main thing is that a lot of my law enforcement career I have been really focused on the community and the preventive aspects of things,” Samarripa said.  “But to see an individual such as her, to be able to come and speak to what the victims see and how they process …  it is really courageous on her behalf.”

At the end of the ceremony, grade school children from on-post schools gathered around III Corps and Fort Hood Deputy Commander Maj. Gen. JT Thomson as he signed the proclamation to stomp out child abuse.

Two horse cavalrymen attended the event in full regalia and boots as the crowd joined in with the children beating their feet against the ground to ‘stomp out’ child abuse.

“I ask that everyone involved, whether military or civilian, unite collaboratively as we continue to lay the foundation in which all children can be raised in caring relationships free of fear and free of abuse,” Thomson said. “Demonstrate our commitment as we pledge our continued support towards resilient Families.”

Our Protectors Come In One Size – Heroes

.jpg photo of Our Protectors, Military, Law Enforcement, and Firefighter graphic
Thank You All!!!!

The impacts of Child Abuse, through the
eyes of an officer

SPOKANE, WA  –  As the first ones to arrive on the scene of a crime, law enforcement officers see the impacts of child abuse firsthand.

“It’s something that you don’t get over quickly – it may never leave you,” said Spokane Police Officer John O’Brien.  “It doesn’t get easier to deal with.  It’s really hard to understand what’s going on in the minds of a parent or guardian that would do that to a child,” he said.

He says child abuse can affect anyone, in any situation.  It’s not limited to a certain neighborhood or demographic.  That’s part of what makes it difficult to address.

“A crime against an adult is horrible as it is, but when you have an innocent, defenseless child who doesn’t know they’re going to be victimized it’s devastating.  There’s no way for that child to fight back or protect themselves,” O’Brien said.

Especially when a child’s life ends because of abuse.

“Officers, you know we have this uniform and we have a tough exterior at times but we are human and we have those same emotions it’s hard to see a child killed at the hands of another person,” O’Brien said.

When law enforcement responds to a child abuse call, they have a chance to break the cycle of abuse.  That’s something that sticks with them.

“You often wonder did that make a difference?  Did that turn the tide for them, that they’ve got clean, done any of the programs that have learned how to be a parent?  Because parenting is not easy at times,” O’Brien said.

That’s why — police say— the community’s help is so critical.

“We can do our part, but we also want the community to help us do that part to say something to partner with us so that we can stop or do our best to at least reduce or eliminate child abuse,” O’Brien said.

Anger Management Pt-3 of 3

.jpg photo of Anger Management graphic
Violence is out-of-control, and Domestic Violence can not be justified.

When To Seek Help

When to seek help for anger management and control

If your anger is still spiraling out of control, despite putting the previous anger management techniques into practice, or if you’re getting into trouble with the law or hurting others  –  you need more help.  There are many therapists, classes, and programs for people with anger management problems.  Asking for help is not a sign of weakness.  You’ll often find others in the same shoes, and getting direct feedback on techniques for controlling anger can be tremendously helpful.

Consider professional help if:

  • You feel constantly frustrated and angry no matter what you try.
  • Your temper causes problems at work or in your relationships.
  • You avoid new events and people because you feel like you can’t control your temper.
  • You have gotten in trouble with the law due to your anger.  Your anger has ever led to physical violence.
  • Your anger has ever led to physical violence.

Therapy for anger problems.  Therapy can be a great way to explore the reasons behind your anger.  If you don’t know why you are getting angry, it’s very hard to control.  Therapy provides a safe environment to learn more about your reasons and identify triggers for your anger.  It’s also a safe place to practice new skills in expressing your anger.

Anger management classes or groups.  Anger management classes or groups allow you to see others coping with the same struggles.  You will also learn tips and techniques for managing your anger and hear other people’s stories.  For domestic violence issues, traditional anger management is usually not recommended.  There are special classes that go to the issue of power and control that are at the heart of domestic violence.

If your loved one has an anger management problem

If your loved one has an anger problem, you probably feel like you’re walking on eggshells all the time.  But always remember that you are not to blame for your loved one’s anger.  There is never an excuse for physically or verbally abusive behavior.  You have a right to be treated with respect and to live without fear of an angry outburst or a violent rage.

Tips for dealing with a loved one’s anger management problem

While you can’t control another person’s anger, you can control how you respond to it:

  • Set clear boundaries about what you will and will not tolerate.
  • Wait for a time when you are both calm to talk to your loved one about the anger problem.  Don’t bring it up when either one of you is already angry.
  • Remove yourself from the situation if your loved one does not calm down.
  • Consider counseling or therapy for yourself if you are having a hard time standing up for yourself.
  • Put your safety first.  Trust your instincts.  If you feel unsafe or threatened in any way, get away from your loved one and go somewhere safe.

Anger isn’t the real problem in abusive relationships

Despite what many people believe, domestic violence and abuse is not due to the abuser’s loss of control over his behavior and temper.  In fact, abusive behavior is a deliberate choice for the sole purpose of controlling you.   If you are in an abusive relationship, know that couples counseling is not recommended  –  and that your partner needs specialized treatment, not regular anger management classes.

Source:  helpguide.org