Tag Archives: Parenting

One Reason The Clergy Thrown Under The Bus

.jpg photo of Chicago teacher that groomed and sexually abused students
Gabriel Valadez has pleaded not guilty after being charged with grooming and sexually abusing a girl for several years.

State was notified of Child Abuse
allegations more than a year before
Waukegan school employee’s arrest

CHICAGO, IL  –  More than a year before a Waukegan school employee was charged with sexually abusing a girl for years, state education authorities were notified that he was fired by Chicago Public Schools on allegations of “child abuse,” records obtained by the Lake County News-Sun show.

Gabriel Valadez, 26, of Darien, was hired by Waukegan District 60 in August 2017, six months after he was suspended by Chicago Public Schools, where he was a special education classroom assistant.  He was fired from CPS in December 2017 after his suspension the previous February.

A letter obtained from Chicago Public Schools shows the Illinois State Board of Education was notified of his termination the following month, in January 2018.  A spokeswoman for the state agency said she could not comment on specific cases, but ISBE records show Valadez’s paraprofessional educators license remains valid.

Defense attorney John Deleon, who is representing Valadez, declined to comment due to the pending charges.  He said his client also would not comment.

An internal Chicago Public Schools memo summarizing Valadez’s 2017 termination hearing concluded that he “exhibited all the classic signs of child grooming behavior,” which occurs when an adult attempts to gain the trust of the child, looks for opportunities to be alone with the child and gives gifts or money to the child.

Valadez, who pleaded not guilty earlier this month, was arrested Feb. 19 at Waukegan District 60’s administrative offices by Chicago police officers and charged with grooming and sexually abusing a girl for several years, when she was between the ages of 9 and 13, according to court records.

He is accused of taking the girl’s hand and having her touch him, of groping her bottom and of asking her to send sexually explicit and nude photographs of herself, according to preliminary complaints filed in Cook County court.

Waukegan District 60 has “not received any official communication” from either Chicago Public Schools or the Illinois State Board of Education regarding Valadez and his time at CPS, district spokesman Nick Alajakis said.

A bill approved by the Illinois House and awaiting action in the Illinois Senate would give the State Board of Education the ability to suspend the licenses of educators under investigation, a change that might have helped Waukegan District 60 learn about Valadez’s history sooner.

The investigation

Valadez joined Chicago Public Schools in May 2014 in office support for the district’s Network 7, according to personnel records obtained from CPS.

Seven months later, in December 2014, he took a job as a special education classroom assistant at Infinity Math, Science and Tech High School in Chicago’s South Lawndale neighborhood, according to personnel records.  A year later, he moved to Jungman Elementary School.

It was at Jungman that questions arose about Valadez’s contact with a student.

Valadez was suspended Feb. 16, 2017, after giving a student a chocolate Valentine’s Day present despite being warned verbally and in writing to have no contact with that student, according to a letter from Chicago Public Schools to Valadez.

Valadez was never the student’s teacher, he told an investigator.  He said during the 2016-17 school year, one of his assignments included taking another student from one classroom to the science lab, where the girl was also assigned during that period.

Valadez was told not to contact the student following a March 2016 incident where he was speaking to the student outside someone’s house after school until the father came home, according to a November 2017 internal memo.

According to the report, Valadez had been reminded of the no-contact order in September 2016 after staff members saw him playing basketball with the student after school hours.  Valadez denied that he had played basketball with the student.

Valadez told Jungman’s principal that he thought it was OK to give the student the chocolates because two other adults were present at the time, according to a redacted copy of the investigative report.  The principal said Valadez told her he had been asked by another special education classroom aide to bring the chocolates for the student.

The other employee told the investigator that she never told Valadez to get chocolates for the students, according to the report.

Valadez later told an investigator that he had brought chocolates and red roses to give to staff, and decided to give the chocolates to the student after he realized he had some left over, according to the report.  He said the student had followed him into the classroom and he gave the student the chocolates and told her, “Get outta here.”

The student told the investigator that she did not know Valadez was not supposed to talk to her, according to the report.  The student said she would often speak to Valadez before and after school, at least once a week, which Valadez denied when interviewed by the investigator.

A union representative who testified on Valadez’s behalf at his termination hearing denied Valadez was engaged in grooming behavior, and said Valadez did not communicate with the student through social media or text messaging.

According to an internal memo, Valadez did not testify at the hearing.

Valadez had previously been investigated in 2015 for alleging staring at student-athletes during practice and making them uncomfortable, for making an inappropriate comment to a former student, and for staring at a student who was in detention, according to the investigative report.

The investigator, who spoke to the students involved as well as staff, found none of the allegations were supported by evidence, according to the report.

Termination and notification

  Following the Feb. 16, 2017, suspension by Chicago Public Schools, Valadez was sometimes paid and sometimes unpaid throughout the course of an investigation and subsequent proceedings, CPS records show.

He was fired in December 2017 and placed on the district’s do-not-hire list, according to a letter from the district to Valadez.

A month later, Chicago Public Schools sent a letter to the Illinois State Board of Education, notifying the agency it had “reasonable cause” to believe he had been fired after “committing an intentional act of child abuse.”

By this time, Valadez had already been hired by Waukegan District 60 as an administrative assistant at its district offices, records show.  Valadez resigned in February, the week after his arrest.

His application with Waukegan, submitted in July 2017, said he was still employed by Chicago Public Schools and had never been fired, which was all true at that point. On a form completed in August, he denied that he had ever been investigated for misconduct, which was not true.

Valadez wasn’t the district’s first pick, according to text messages sent by Superintendent Theresa Plascencia to a school board member following Valadez’s arrest.  Three other applicants, including an internal candidate, received offers but declined the job.

Plascencia did know Valadez from her time at CPS, but she was not involved in his hiring at Waukegan, Alajakis said.

Plascencia was the chief of Network 7 from November 2013 to August 2015 when she took a new role with CPS as executive director for high school design, programs and support.  She left CPS in April 2016 prior to the start of the internal investigation into Valadez’s conduct at Jungman.

Notifications like Chicago Public Schools’ letter to ISBE, which are required under state law, can trigger an investigation by the Illinois State Board of Education and ultimately the suspension or revocation of an educator’s license, ISBE spokeswoman Jackie Matthews said.

Matthews, who declined to comment on any particular case, said there is no way to predict how long any single case will take to resolve because each comes with its own set of circumstances.

Valadez still had an active paraprofessional educator license as of Friday, Illinois State Board of Education records show.

ISBE will hold off on an investigation, for example, if the police or Department of Child and Family Services are conducting their own investigations, Matthews said. The amount of time it takes for those investigations and criminal proceedings to conclude “varies significantly.”

That means an educator’s license can remain valid and, if they’ve since moved on to another district, no one there may know they’re under investigation.

ISBE does not have the ability to suspend educators’ licenses while they are being investigated for serious alleged crimes involving physical and sexual abuse, though it would want that authority, ISBE’s general counsel, Stephanie Jones, testified before the General Assembly last year.

A bill that would give ISBE that power passed the Illinois Senate in a 57-0 vote April 11.  It is now being considered by the House.

Timeline

May 2014: Gabriel Valadez joins Chicago Public Schools in Network 7 office support.

December 2014: Valadez takes a special education classroom assistant position at Infinity Math, Science and Tech High School.

December 2015: Valadez moves to Jungman Elementary School.

March 2016: Valadez told to have no contact with a student at Jungman.

February 2017: Valadez was suspended after giving Valentine’s Day chocolates to the student with whom he had been ordered to have no contact.

August 2017: Valadez is hired at Waukegan District 60 as an administrative assistant at its district offices.

December 2017: Valadez is fired from Chicago Public Schools.

January 2018: Chicago Public Schools notifies the Illinois State Board of Education that it fired Valadez over allegations of child abuse.

February 2019: Valadez is arrested at Waukegan District 60’s administrative office on charges of child sexual abuse and grooming.  He voluntarily resigns the following week.

We Joked About Child Abuse In The 90s

.jpg photo of pedophile that molested daughter
Pedophile that Sexually Abused his Daughter

Then The Daughter The Convicted Pedophile Raped Speaks Up

It was 1996 when police arrested Jim and Justine and charged them with prolonged sexual abuse and exploitation of their 13-year-old daughter, Amanda.

At the time, Jim claimed that he didn’t think he was doing any harm to his daughter, and that in those days, child molestation was considered “something people joke about” — citing comic book “Chester The Molester” as supposed cultural evidence of this.

But the repercussions of that abuse — which began when his daughter was just 11 — would haunt Amanda into her adulthood, sending her life sideways as she attempted to self-medicate and escape the pain.

Now, 20 years later, Amanda and her biological parents meet again — Amanda for an apology, her parents (particularly her father) forgiveness.

Appearing on Wednesday’s episode of “Dr. Phil,” Amanda says her parents would routinely photograph her in “provocative” situations and video tape her performing various sexual acts— sometimes with her father — with the plan to sell the tapes across the world.

She tells Dr. Phil: “Jim told me with the money we could make, I could go to college”

Amanda adds that she never saw any of her supposed earnings.  Her mother, on stage with Amanda already, begins weeping, presumably overwhelmed with guilt and regret at her part in the abuse.

Then Dr. Phil brings out Amanda’s father.  The audience is silent as he walks out, the tension at its peak.

Amanda starts in on Jim, at first tenuously, seeming to barely contain her rage:

“Where to begin?….  How could you?”

Amanda begins to ask questions directly to her father — reluctantly, at first — saying she’s “dreamed of this moment,” but adding:

“Truthfully I would have preferred if you had been six feet under.”

Jim says to Amanda as she stares at him in anger and disbelief that he’s ashamed that he only remembers abusing Amanda four or five times when it was obviously a regular routine in the family.

Looking straight at his daughter, he says:

“It should have been burned into my memory as much as it was into yours.”

As Amanda recounts how her life spiraled out of control into adulthood — addiction, work as a topless dancer, even the creation of an alter ego to escape the pain she was experiencing — it’s clear that the memories left significant scars with lasting impact.

But the most chilling moments in the episode come from a one-on-one interview with Jim taped earlier, in which the former convict claims that during the early 1990’s, “sexually abusing children were things that people winked and joked about.”

Unbelievably, he goes on to complain that he’d been “exploited, taken advantage of [and] beaten up,” in prison.  He also protested that he had never been aroused by his daughter, but rather was interested in the “mechanics.”

But Dr. Phil doesn’t pull punches responding to claims that Jim didn’t know what he was doing to his daughter, saying directly to Amanda:

“To suggest that he was in an environment where parents didn’t know it wasn’t okay to rape their children is insulting your intelligence, it’s insulting to your experience, it is a complete insult to this entire experience between him and you.  Now he’s either that naive, or he’s just thumbing his nose at you because that is an idiotic statement.”

To watch the entire episode, which aired on Wednesday of this week, check Dr. Phil’s website for listings.

The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault, which collects statistics nationally, reports that 46% of children who are sexually abused are the victims of family members.

It also reports that 61% of American rape victims are raped before the age of 18, and unbelievable 29% of all rapes occurred before the victim was 11.

 

CPS Failed Leiliana Wright

.jpg photo of Police Car
CPS Failed Leiliana Wright

CPS Workers, Investigator Out After 4-Year-Old Child’s Death

Two Texas Child Protective Services workers were fired and a third resigned following the death of a 4-year-old girl in Grand Prairie, the agency confirms.

Leiliana Wright died March 13.  Her mother and the woman’s boyfriend have both been arrested, accused of felony injury to a child in connection with the death.

Arrests Made; Child, 4, Dies After Beating: Police

In a statement Monday, a CPS agency spokesperson said, “the caseworker and supervisor on the case have been dismissed from the agency.  A CPS Special Investigator who worked on the case resigned.”

The child’s paternal grandmother told NBC 5 she had contacted CPS to report her concerns with Leiliana’s well-being.

Grand Prairie Mom Arrested After Child Dies of Head Injury

“I called CPS. I called the governor.  I called whoever I could,” grandmother Alisa Clakely said.  “I took pictures and sent them to CPS.”

In response, Clakely said CPS case workers told her they would look into the issues.  But then, nothing would happen.

“If we had done something sooner, I don’t know,” Clakely said.  “I don’t know.”
The child’s mother, Jeri Quezada, is being held on $500,000 bond while Charles Phifer is being held on $1 million bond.

In an arrest affidavit released last week, police allege the couple used heroin and repeatedly beat and restrained the girl before she stopped breathing, after which the child was transported to an area hospital where she was pronounced dead.

According to CPS, Leiliana’s case is being reviewed internally.  A full report will be released in the next few weeks.

Say YES To Winston’s Law In Alabama

abama District Attorney
District Attorney Randall Houston

Child Abuse Legislation ‘Winston’s Law’
Gets Start In Legislature

Featured on My Brother’s Keeper, December 15, 2015

Alabama  –  District Attorney Randall Houston hopes that an early start in the effort to strengthen punishment in aggravated child abuse cases makes all the difference.

He recalls how it took three years for a bill to change the boating under the influence law to work its way through the Legislature.  He pursued that bill after a series of fatal boating under the influence accidents occurred in his circuit.

“We hope Winston’s Law can make it through the House and Senate quickly this session and go on to the governor’s desk for his signature.”  Houston, who represents Autauga, Chilton and Elmore counties, said.  “We have picked up strong support for the bill.”

Named for the now 5-year-old boy who is at the center of a high-profile Elmore County child abuse case, Winston’s Law would make aggravated child abuse cases where the victim is 6 years old or younger a Class A felony.  Reserved for the most serious crimes in the state, Class A felonies have a punishment range of 10 to 99 years to life in prison.

Aggravated child abuse is now a Class B felony, with a punishment range of 2 to 20 years in prison.

The District Attorneys Association of Alabama and Child Protect have endorsed the bill.  Rep. Paul Beckman, R- Prattville, and state Sen. Clyde Chambliss Jr., R- Prattville, are sponsoring the bill.

In September Winston was found unresponsive in the back of Scott Hicks’ vehicle in the parking lot of the Bay County, Fla., courthouse, where Hicks went to clear up some unrelated warrants.

After deputies found Winston in the vehicle, Hicks, 38, was charged with aggravated child abuse.  He remains in the Bay County Jail.  The investigation shows that the abuse occurred in Elmore County.  His mother, Hallee McLeod, 29, was recently indicted by the Elmore County Grand Jury on charges of aggravated child abuse and chemical endangerment of a child.  Hicks and McLeod, boyfriend and girlfriend, are both Wetumpka residents, Houston said

She remains in the Elmore County Jail under bonds totaling $300,000, jail records show.  She could not be reached for comment and courthouse records show she doesn’t have an attorney.  Houston said Hicks will face similar charges in Elmore County, when the charges against him in Florida adjudicated.

Hicks was a co-owner of Spa Rejuvenate which had locations in Prattville and Montgomery.  McLeod was the manager of the Prattville location.  The Alabama Board of Message Therapy suspended the business license for the Prattville location and entered a non-renewal order for the license at the Montgomery location after the couple’s arrest.

At the time Sheriff Bill Franklin called the physical abuse Winston went through “the worst I have seen.”

“It certainly is the worst I have seen, where the child lived,” said Houston, a veteran prosecutor.”

Winston is now with his father, Joey Crampton, and making a “remarkable” recovery.

“Winston is in a loving, supporting environment and from all signs is doing much better than any of us could have ever hoped,” Houston said.  “He has several more medical procedures that he is facing, and he may well face emotional troubles given the horrific abuse he went through.

“But now he is doing very well, and for that we are all very thankful.”

If passed, Winston’s Law will not be in effect for his case, since McLeod and Hicks were charged before the law was enacted.

“If anything good can come out of a bad situation, it is ensuring that justice is for everyone going forward,” Crampton wrote on the Facebook page JusticeForWinston.  “If we can have a law that protects people, humanity, children especially, that to me is what justice is about.”

Child Abuse Increases

.jpg photo of Child Abuse poster
Child Abuse increases with declining economy, holiday season

Child Abuse increases with declining economy, holiday season

It is estimated that 80 percent of all addresses have at least one sex offender within one mile and there are 266 registered sex offenders in Midland County, according to the Midland County Sheriff’s Office, and 200 in the city of Midland, according to the Midland Police Department. Search Midland’s Sex Offender registry here: http://www.sheriffalerts.com/cap_main.php?office=54759

Midland, TX  –  The holidays, coupled with a declining economy, brings stress to all, but it also brings a more disturbing trend: a rise in child abuse.  Local agencies that provide counseling and crisis services to abuse victims say that both physical and sexual abuse cases are on the rise, but suspected child sexual abuse cases remain in the majority.

“(Child abuse) is a huge problem here and it has been for years,” said Kristi Edwards, Clinical/Operations director and counselor for Centers for Children and Families.  “When times are really bad, people’s stress levels go up, their frustration goes through the roof. Kids are kids no matter what, they don’t understand that dad’s job or mom’s job is cutting hours or employees.”

Not only does an increase occur during downturns, but the advent of the holidays regardless of the economy is unfortunately a reliable predictor of spikes in child abuse, said Elisha McPeek, program director and lead forensic interviewer at the Midland Rape Crisis and Children’s Advocacy Center.

“The boom starts to bust, things become tight, families become stressed, and physical and sexual abuse tends to go up,” McPeek said.  “When Christmas comes, kids are out of school, these things go up as well.”

Child sexual abuse is suspected to be vastly underreported for the most part.  So far this year, MRCCAC has performed forensic interviews with 504 children for alleged physical and sexual abuse, observing homicides and other court cases.

Of that number, 319 have been suspected sexual abuse cases.  In 2014, there were 542 children interviewed total, with 352 for suspected sexual abuse.

“Child sexual abuse exists in Midland as much as people don’t want to admit it does,” said Paula Cox, MRCCAC education director. “We’re not any different from the rest of the country. Horrible things happen in this area, too.”

Cox hasn’t seen noticeable progress when it comes to lowering child sexual abuse rates here over the past few years.

“It’s a bigger issue absolutely than people realize,” McPeek said.  “And if kiddos are not receiving support and therapy and intervention it will cause issues for them later in life.”

Permian Basin Community Centers psychiatrist Mark Luley said a large number of the patients he sees in the Bridges Behavioral Health Clinic are coming in with mental health issues related to childhood sexual abuse.

“In our clinics we see a lot of PTSD,” Luley said.  “There’s a huge trend here.  If you suffer from PTSD or depression as a child, you’re more likely to use alcohol.  My clinic certainly has a lot of alcohol dependence, a lot of cocaine dependence, and what’s really concerning is the synthetic canniboids.  Generally a lot of (the PTSD and substance abuse) is related to childhood sexual abuse and mental abuse during childhood.”

Texas law defines sexual abuse of a child “any sexual conduct harmful to a child’s mental, emotional or physical welfare as well as failure to make a reasonable effort to prevent sexual conduct with a child.  A person who compels or encourages a child to engage in sexual conduct commits abuse, and it is against the law to make or possess child pornography or to display such material to a child.”

No matter the severity of the abuse, the consequences on the victim’s mental and physical well-being can be detrimental.  The fact that 98 percent of sexual abuse perpetrators are family friends, relatives or otherwise known and trusted by the child, only adds to the devastation that the abuse can inflict and the effort made to keep it secret.

“Childhood sexual abuse can be an underlying issue in many later problems in adulthood,” wrote Bridges Behavioral Health Clinician Amber Hoelscher in an email.  “I have seen it manifested through depression, anxiety and addiction, just to name a few.  Many adults may not make the connection that the abuse from their past is still bothering them in their current daily lives.”

Centers for Family and Children serves clients age 3 and up.  Of their clientele, more than 50 percent report some kind of sexual abuse, and 25 percent will report some type of childhood sexual abuse, Edwards said.

“Whenever you’ve had severe childhood sexual trauma, just like PTSD in veterans, it colors everything you do,” Edwards said.

However, many adults don’t see the issues they’re struggling with as PTSD, identifying it as depression, anxiety or an inability to sleep due to nightmares, Hoelscher said.  But the symptoms often manifest in full-blown PTSD or varying degrees of a stress disorder.

“The people we work with say they can’t go anywhere without knowing where the exits are,” Edwards said.  “It affects your relationships, your ability to pay attention.  A lot of people will say they’re afraid they’ll lose their job because sometimes when they’re in the middle of something they’ll have some kind of anxiety and they don’t want to tell people why –that it’s because they were raped or molested as a child.”

With any kind of abuse, victims often report feeling shame. But with sexual abuse, that level of shame has a different tone.

“That’s happening before you even know what sex is about,” Edwards said.  “Somebody that’s touching you, either hurting you or saying you love me so trust me, or don’t tell or I’ll hurt you or your family.  That messes you up. But there’s also pleasure associated with sexual stimulation. So that can also cause the shame.  Yes, it did feel good, or yes, I had an orgasm.  But you know it’s wrong because it was with a brother or an uncle or dad or a trusted baby sitter or whatever.  Almost everybody who’s experienced some type of sexual abuse says it’s difficult to be emotionally connected with other people.”

Victims of sexual abuse are often “groomed” to not tell, or to feel that the abuse is their fault.  This can keep a child from making an outcry, and thus, reporting by outsiders becomes essential.

“Whether you’re a parent, teacher, coach, youth pastor, it’s really about getting to know your kids and allowing them to talk to you,” Cox said.  “If they once were very happy child, an extrovert, and then all of a sudden they go into their shell, or they don’t want to go to school or go home or have unexplained bruises or injuries.  All of these signs don’t necessarily mean they’re being abused, but something’s going on, so whether or not it’s abuse, it’s something you need to have a conversation about.”

If there’s any suspicion at all, it’s worth it to report it, Cox said.

“A lot of people say, what if I’m wrong?  What if nothing is going on? OK, but what if there is? That’s what you need to focus on.  Not whether the kid or the mom is gonna be mad at you because I would much rather deal with somebody hating me than to know I didn’t do something when a child is being abused.”

One in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys is sexually abused before their 18th birthday, according to Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas. Conversations about what inappropriate touching is has to happen earlier, Edwards and Hoelscher said.

“The schools teach stranger danger, good touch bad touch, etc., but some of those classes don’t start until you’re in junior high,” Edwards said.  “We’ve gotta start younger. I’m gonna say 2 and 3 is probably an age in which we need to start giving voice to these kids.  They start knowing what their private parts are, so we start saying we don’t show those in public, we don’t touch those in public.  So to me a natural extension of that is, no one else looks at those, no one else touches those.”

The healing process from sexual abuse can be long and difficult, but there is a way to find peace in a healthy way, local professionals said. Truly healing from sexual abuse often requires the help of a professional.

“We build on successive experiences,” Edwards said.  “If your early childhood is successive experiences of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, that’s all you’ve got in your head and every memory that’s connected to takes you back to something like that. There’s no foundation of safety and control.”

Many who have experienced childhood abuse fall into reckless and dangerous behavior when they get older, such as self-harming behaviors, substance abuse and sexual promiscuity.

“It can be that they think they don’t deserve any better,” Edwards said.  “Who’s gonna ever want me?  Is this ever gonna be an act of love for me because it’s never been an act of love?  It’s always been an act of ‘they’re more powerful than I am, I’m helpless.’  It makes you feel powerless, dirty, ruined, shamed.  It affects you in your job, your relationship with your children, your friends, the way you feel about yourself. It affects your spirituality because people say how could God love me?”

A foundation of self-love, security and trust takes time to build.

“A large percentage of the population we see has a hard time coming to grips with some of the things that have happened to them before, and I think they try to block off those thoughts, and, as a result, don’t seek treatment,” Luley said.  “A large percentage of our population (in Bridges Behavioral) has childhood PTSD and they’ve never received treatment for the things they encountered when they were young, be it mental, physical, or sexual abuse.  And those are things that really require treatment.”

Have you experienced childhood sexual, physical or emotional trauma? Have you found a way to heal?  If you’d like to share your story, please email reporter Erin Stone at estone@mrt.com.

Centers for Children and Families
Services: Counseling
Cost: Free
Location: 1004 N. Big Spring St., Ste 325
Contact: 432-570-4069

Midland Rape Crisis and Children’s Advocacy Center
Services: Forensic interviews and crisis intervention services, free counseling for victims of all ages and their families, and group therapy.
Cost: Free
Location: 1700 N. Big Spring St.
Contact: 432.682.7273 answered 24 hours a day

Permian Basin Community Centers
Services: Mental health services, intellectual and development disability services, substance abuse/chemical dependency, early childhood intervention, HIV services, Veteran’s services.
Cost: Free
Location 401 E. Illinois Ave.
Contact: 432.580.510