Tag Archives: Special Needs

Special Needs Child Locked In Basement Storage

.jpg photo of Child Abuse graphic
Special Needs Child locked In basement storage room.

Macy couple pleads not guilty to
Child Abuse

OMAHA, NE  –  A Macy, Nebraska, husband and wife have pleaded not guilty to locking a 10-year-old foster son in a basement storage room.

Krista Parker entered her plea Monday in U.S. District Court in Omaha to federal and state charges of kidnapping, child abuse/neglect and false imprisonment. Charles Parker pleaded not guilty to the same charges Thursday.

Trial dates have not been set.

According to court documents, authorities on Sept. 15 were called to the Parker home about a report of a boy locked in a storage room.

Officers found the boy locked in the dark, windowless room, amid trash, a few toys and human feces.  The room stunk of urine and feces, court documents said.

Krista Parker was found passed out upstairs, and a preliminary breath test showed her blood-alcohol content at 0.126 percent.

Parker confessed to locking the boy in the room a few hours earlier, court documents said, but denied confining the special-needs boy, who had been in her foster care for nine months, in the room previously.

Charles Parker told officers he was unaware that his wife had confined their son in the room that night, but he said that they occasionally locked the boy in the room for several hours and maybe for a night one time, court documents said.

The boy told a forensic interviewer that the storage room was his bedroom and that he slept on the floor because he did not have a bed.

Grand Prairie Files No Charges After Special Needs Child Molested

Father of boy who civil jury says was sexually assaulted worries that teacher who did it is still near kids

Dallas County, TX  –  A Dallas civil jury found a teacher sexually assaulted an 11-year-old boy with autism.  Now the child’s father is raising concerns about whether the teacher is still around children at the same school.

His son had attended Anderson Private School in Parker County for six weeks when, the civil jury found, Alexander Anderson, now 31, sexually assaulted the boy on an Oct. 31, 2014 field trip to Ripley’s Believe It or Not! in Grand Prairie.  The teacher, Alexander Anderson, lives with his parents in a nearby home that shares the same address as the school.

,jpg photo of Ripley's Believe It or Not attraction in Grand Prairie Texas
Ripley’s Believe It or Not attraction in Grand Prairie, TX

The father of the boy is afraid that Anderson may still have “access to kids,” he said in an interview with The Dallas Morning News.  The News does not typically identify victims of sexual assault or their families.  The boy just turned 15.

The civil jury awarded the boy and his father more than $8 million in December after finding Anderson committed sexual assault and assault against the boy and after finding that Anderson’s parents had defamed the child’s father during a police investigation into the incident.

No criminal charges have been filed and Grand Prairie police closed the investigation.  The case was tried in Dallas because Ripley’s is in Dallas County.

William “Rocky” Feemster, an attorney for the Andersons and the school, said Alexander Anderson, his parents and the school say no sexual assault occurred.
“My clients disputed the allegations and continue to do that,” he said.  “My clients, especially Alexander Anderson, denied this even occurred.”

Feemster confirmed that Anderson still lives “contiguous” to Anderson Private School.  Records show they share the same Fort Worth address on five acres in Parker County.  Several buildings are located on the property, including the home where Anderson lives with his parents, who founded and operate the school.

Anderson also worked at the school and the school’s website still says he is on the staff, but Feemster says he stopped working for the school after the jury’s verdict.

Anderson does not have a criminal conviction and a civil jury’s verdict does not require him to register as a sex offender.  So there’s nothing to prevent him from living close to a school.

In December, a jury awarded the boy $4,041,250 from Alexander Anderson “for the sexual assault and the assault,” according to court records.  The same jury also awarded the father $1.75 million “for the defamation” by William Anderson and $2.5 million “for the defamation” by LeVonna Anderson.  William Anderson is Alexander Anderson’s father and LeVonna Anderson is his mother.

The boy is a high functioning autistic child, according to his father.   He attended regular classes in public school with the help of an aide until, as the school district grew, the father decided to look elsewhere.  He chose Anderson Private School because it presented itself to the boy’s family as a safe environment with highly qualified teachers in a highly supervised environment.    There were about 15 students enrolled when the boy attended, his father said.

The field trip

All students leave the school each Friday for “an adventurous experience” and they also take an overnight trip each year, according to the school’s website.

The father of the assault victim chaperoned the 2014 field trip to Ripley’s, which features a wax museum and an exhibit of odd but true events.

During the trip, the father said in an interview, he began to panic when he lost sight of his son.

Grainy, silent surveillance video shows the boy and his father in the lobby.  The father walks into an adjacent room to talk to others on the field trip.  John Sloan, the family attorney, said the father was asking other adults on the trip whether they were going through the exhibits as a single group or in smaller groups.  In the video, the father picks up his belongings and walks back to the lobby.

Only seconds have passed, but his son is no longer in the lobby.  Another camera recorded Alexander Anderson walking out of an exhibit and the boy following him back inside the exhibit.

The father said he found his son alone in the gift shop after they’d been separated about 11 minutes.  At the time, the father said, he didn’t realize something had happened to his son while they were separated.

“It was during this field trip that Alexander Anderson preyed upon and sexually assaulted” the child, the lawsuit alleged.  “Alexander Anderson was familiar with Ripley’s, as the Anderson School had taken field trips there in the past.  As a result of his familiarity, Alexander Anderson knew Ripley’s did not have adequate security or adequate staffing in many areas of the premises and there would be ample opportunity to commit his intended sexual assault.”

The lawsuit said Alexander Anderson “took advantage of” the boy’s disability and “lured” him “into an area at Ripley’s where he knew they were alone and away from the group, and sexually assaulted” him.

Later, at home, the father began to worry that something had happened on the field trip.  He told The News that his son, “told me later that evening that the teachers at his school were ‘mean.’  He had been super excited about school until then.”

The father phoned the son’s therapist, Sloan said.  The therapist later met with the boy and then called the police.

According to medical records from Cook Children’s hospital in Fort Worth, the boy told a nurse specific details about the assault.

He also told the nurse “Alex is bad.  I don’t like Anderson school.”

Police investigation

Grand Prairie police began to investigate the case Nov. 4. 2014, but said in a statement that there was not enough evidence to file charges.

“Both insufficient evidence and conflicting evidence hindered prosecution of this case,” the department said in a statement.  “Should additional evidence become available, we will immediately re-open the case.”

Sloan said a flawed police investigation prevented a criminal case from moving forward.

“By allowing the adult suspect’s mother to be present during Alexander Anderson’s first and only interrogation, and by allowing her to dominate the interrogation with defamatory statement after defamatory statement about the victim’s father the GPPD investigation was tainted from the beginning,” Sloan said.

Typically, law enforcement investigators interview people separately or with only their attorneys present.  When people are interviewed together, officers have a more difficult time determining their individual version of events.

The father said William and LeVonna Anderson told police and others that he was “on drugs” and was “outside using drugs” during the field trip.  In the civil trial, the jury awarded part of the $8 million judgment for defamation after finding those allegations to be false.

Grand Prairie police declined to answer questions about whether defamatory statements against the father or interviewing Alexander Anderson and his mother at the same time damaged the investigation.

Feemster, the attorney for the Andersons, said the police investigation went nowhere because Alexander Anderson committed no crime.

Settlement

The school does not have insurance, Sloan said.  The Andersons’ homeowners insurance policy covers defamation, he said, but not money owed to the boy because of the sexual assault.

Earlier this month, the school, the Andersons and their insurance company came to an agreement with the father and his son on how to resolve the case.  The agreement could be finalized soon, but the terms are confidential.

Feemster said his clients’ insurance company decided to settle rather than appeal. Both sides, he said, wanted to settle “to get away from each other” and have the case finished.

The News tried to reach the Andersons through the school.  A man who answered the school’s phone declined to identify himself or answer questions about the lawsuit.

“It was a frivolous lawsuit.  Nothing ever happened.  It was done for money,” the man said before hanging up.

The father said he hopes Grand Prairie police carry on with the investigation.

The father said his son’s life will never be the same after the assault, adding that he is worried about other students at the school.

“We hoped to make it so he’s not a teacher anymore,” the father said.  His son is “alive but he’s destroyed.”

FL School Resource Officer Suspended

.jpg photo of Father and his Son who was abused
Eddie Perillo and his Son

School resource officer suspended during
Child Abuse investigation

OKALOOSA COUNTY, FL  –  A former Okaloosa County school resource officer was suspended for “allegations of unsatisfactory performance and not obeying the rules”, according to a report released by the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office (OCSO).

It all came to light, the OCSO reports, when the sheriff’s office began investigating allegations of child abuse at Kenwood Elementary School in May.

OCSO launched an internal investigation when child protection investigators with the Department of Children and Families (DCF) revealed the resource officer did not help or cooperate with multiple ongoing child abuse investigations at the elementary school.

Officials say Officer Dwayne Vasiloff wrote seven initial child abuse reports between August 2016 and June of 2017.  However, during that same time, DCF investigators made 46 investigative visits to the school.

The internal investigation deemed Vasiloff neglected his duty and was “content” with DCF handle the investigations and the resulting workload.

While Vasiloff denied any wrongdoing, he was suspended without pay, reassigned and put on probation.  The sheriff’s office said Vasiloff retired in July before finishing his probation.

The State Attorney’s Office said the investigation has “no bearing on the ongoing criminal investigation in the Marlynn Stillions case”, according to OCSO. Channel 3 News reached out to Assistant State Attorney Greg Marcille, who said Vasiloff is “not a suspect at this time.  The investigation is ongoing and if additional facts come forward it is possible that status could change.”

The special needs teacher faces four counts of child abuse related to allegations she abused a boy with Autism. 

CO Boys & Girls Ranch Shut Down Over Violations

.jpg photo of El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch Logo
El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch Logo

El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch license suspended after reports of Child Abuse

PUEBLO, CO  –  A child care facility in Pueblo has been shut down after reports of child abuse surfaced to the Department of Human Services.

Over the last year, El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch has had 11 repeat violations regarding use of physical restraints, six repeat violations regarding inappropriate discipline, 18 repeat violations of children’s rights, and five repeat lack of supervision violations.

DHS requested on September 25 that El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch’s license be suspended on the following grounds:

On July 20, the Department received a complaint stating that the “current Chief Executive Officer of El Pueblo inappropriately restrained a child.”  The Chief Executive Officer also submitted false and misleading documentation to the Department regarding the incident.

In August, another report made to DHS stated that a child ran from El Pueblo and rode in the back of a train for at least one hour.  The child claimed that he was being bullied and that the staff would not intervene.  He also said El Pueblo wasn’t providing adequate medical attention.

About a month later, a third report was made that staff at El Pueblo weren’t giving a “high needs” child all the necessary medications he/she required and that the child left the facility with an unexplained burn.

Also during the month of September, a child who was supposed to be under one-on-one supervision was left alone and escaped out a window.  It took at least an hour to find the child.

On September 20, a staff member allegedly physically abused a child.  “Staff pulled the child’s hair, scratched the child, and elbowed and kneed the child’s body,” according to DHS’ order of summary suspension document.  Staff is also being accused of punching that child in the mouth around the same time.

 A day later, a child with disabilities was reportedly rolling around the ground and staff was told by administrators not to intervene. The order of summary suspension paperwork says that over a time frame of around 25 minutes, the child ended up biting their own arms and legs, resulting in bleeding wounds and pulled off his or her own skin and was chewing and eating it.

DHS says that it has also received several reports that more than one child at El Pueblo had attempted suicide.  DHS was also notified that children were showing significant weight loss after leaving El Pueblo and that the children were expressing they were hungry.

DHS sent the following statement to KRDO NewsChannel 13:

“DHS is working with the agencies who have placed children at El Pueblo, as they are moved to other placements as quickly as possible.  All children and youth will be moved before CDHS staff leave the facility.  While the specific locations are confidential, all children and youth will be moved to licensed facilities (other residential child care facilities, group homes or group centers), certified providers (foster care homes), or with their parent/guardian, if appropriate.”

El Pueblo Boys & Girls Ranch located at One El Pueblo Ranch Way in Pueblo, Colo. opened January 1, 1995.  It applied for a license continuation around the time of March 17, 2017.

FL School District Covered Abuse Of Special Needs Child Over A Year

.jpg photo of Father and his Son who was abused
Eddie Perillo and his Son

School district addresses Child Abuse claims
in special news conference

OKALOOSA COUNTY, FL  –  Allegations of an Okaloosa County special needs teacher abusing a nonverbal child with autism has rocked the county.

On Monday, the school board will hold its regular meeting less than an hour after the superintendent holds a press conference.

The father of the child who was allegedly abused believes the school district tried to cover up signs of abuse.

Others in the community said it’s time for more oversight.

The saga began in 2015 at Kenwood Elementary School, when Eddie Perillo’s nonverbal autistic son moved into the classroom of Marlynn Stillions.

Eddie’s son spent more than a year in the teacher’s classroom.  At the same time, Eddie noticed changes to his son’s behavior.

“He became aggressive and he had aggressive behavior and just was acting a little different,” Perillo said.

It took until May of 2017 when Perillo was able to obtain a copy of a school district investigation, which accused Stillions of abusing the children in her care, for Perillo to learn about the alleged abuse.

He took the case to the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office and believes it goes all the way to the superintendent’s office.

“I believe she knew about it.  To be honest with you, that’s my thoughts on everything. and if she didn’t, which is very hard to believe, she definitely should’ve been aware of it and taken action,” Perillo said.

The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office investigated the claims and made three arrests, including the teacher, the principal of Kenwood Elementary and the school district’s investigator.

Other members of the autism community, like Angela Hager in Okaloosa County, said it’s a crossroad for the district.

Her autistic son spent almost two decades in Okaloosa County schools.

“I was shocked and very disturbed that not only those events happening, that there were so many witnesses that had seen these things happen and did not come forward until there was an employee intervention being conducted,” Hager said.

She’s on the agenda to speak at Monday night’s meeting.

“I think that there are things that can be done to fix this.  That’s what I want to see.  It’s not that I’ve lost all faith, it’s just that there are deficiencies that need to be addressed,” Hager said.