Tag Archives: Values

One Million Moms Need Our Help With The Hilton App

.jpg photo of Child Predator and Child Sexual Abuse graphic
Please sign the petition

Hilton Attempts to Normalize Sin

Hilton’s current commercial “Make an Entrance with the Hilton App” attempts to normalize sin by featuring two men together with a young boy.  The two dads are shown walking through the hotel lobby and to their room while one dad carries the sleeping toddler.  This ad is inappropriate on so many levels and is clearly attempting to desensitize viewers.  Hilton should avoid aiming to please a small percentage of customers while pushing away conservative customers.

Promoting same sex relationships has nothing to do with marketing their company.  Yet Hilton wants to make it clear where they stand on this controversial topic, instead of remaining neutral in the culture war.  One Million Moms continues to stand up for biblical truth, which is very clear in Romans 1:26-27 about this particular type of sexual perversion.

One Million Moms must remain diligent.  Scripture says multiple times that homosexuality is wrong, and God will not tolerate this sinful nature.

Hilton attempting to redefine the family crosses a line Hilton should have never crossed.  There is concern about the way this advertisement is pushing the LGBTQ agenda, but an even greater concern is that the commercial is airing when children are likely to be watching television.  To make matters worse, this advertisement has aired during family viewing time such as football games and primetime.

TAKE ACTION!

If you agree that this ad is inappropriate, sign our petition urging Hilton to pull its “Two Gay Dads” commercial immediately.  And please share this with your friends and family.

TAKE ACTION NOW

Blessings,
Monica Cole, Director
OneMillionMoms

The Last Days Of A 5-Year-Old

.jpg photo of 5-year-old Boy, who had skin breakdown or bedsores, and was tied down, or was so weak or malnourished that he was unable to move at the end of his life.
5-year-old Elijah Lewis suffered a level of abuse that went far beyond what they typically see, “It would fall into the category of torture, really.”

Medical experts say Elijah Lewis appears to have been ‘tortured’

Autopsy raises new questions about texts sent by New Hampshire child’s mother

The sores were something you’d see on someone living in a derelict nursing home — or someone held in restraints.  The malnourishment hinted at weeks, if not months, without adequate food.  And then there was the trauma to the head.

The final days of 5-year-old Elijah Lewis’s short life remain shrouded in mystery, but medical experts say the recent autopsy findings alone suggest the shaggy-haired little boy from Merrimack, N.H., suffered a level of abuse that went far beyond what they typically see.

“It’s more than just . . .  minor medical neglect,” said Alice W. Newton, medical director of the Child Protection Program at Massachusetts General Hospital.  “It would fall into the category of torture, really.”

The autopsy results also raise new questions about text messages sent by the boy’s mother, Danielle Dauphinais, 35, who is being held without bail in New Hampshire along with her boyfriend, Joseph Stapf, 30.  In the January texts sent to a friend and obtained by the Globe, Dauphinais said she argued with Stapf’s mother for giving Elijah too much food, saying “this child will eat till he pukes.”   Stapf’s mother, according to Dauphinais’s text, said it was “child abuse” to withhold food from a child.

Five-year-old Elijah Lewis had fentanyl in his system and died from violence and neglect, autopsy finds

Reached Monday, Dauphinais’s attorney, Jaye Rancourt, declined to comment on the messages, saying that “without verification that this is actually a text message from my client,  I can’t really respond.  This could be a complete fabrication.”

The texts match a detailed description of the messages given by the person who originally received them.

Questions about the circumstances of Elijah’s death have only grown since his body was discovered in the woods of Abington, Mass., on Oct. 23, following a 10-day search that included law enforcement agencies from at least five states.  Since then, authorities have released little in the way of details as they continue to investigate.  Meanwhile, relatives and people who lived near the child’s home in Merrimack say they seldom saw the boy in the months leading up to his disappearance.

The Massachusetts medical examiner’s office last month ruled the boy’s death a homicide, determining the cause to be “violence and neglect, including facial and scalp injuries, acute fentanyl intoxication, malnourishment and pressure ulcers.”  Pressure ulcers, more commonly referred to as bedsores, are typically found in bedridden people unable to change position.

But neither Dauphinais nor Stapf has been charged with murder. Instead, they are being held on charges of child endangerment and witness tampering related to their alleged attempts to mislead investigators trying to determine the boy’s whereabouts in October. Both have pleaded not guilty.

Mom accused of encouraging people to lie about whereabouts of missing 5-year-old N.H. boy, prosecutors say

It remains unclear how involved New Hampshire’s Division for Children, Youth and Families was with the boy prior to his disappearance.  The agency has declined to comment on the case, though authorities have said that DCYF initially reported the boy missing to law enforcement on Oct. 14, and Dauphinais told a friend last June that she’d been in contact with the agency.

Texts sent by Dauphinais to another friend and obtained by the Globe make it clear that she had serious concerns about her son, including the amount he ate, at least nine months before the boy was discovered missing.

In a text to a friend on Jan. 7, Dauphinais complained that Stapf’s mother, Joanne — with whom the couple shared a home — was feeding the boy against her wishes.  Dauphinais said Joanne Stapf would also “baby him and love on him” even when Elijah acted up.
“I made Elijah a decent plate of food and she insisted on giving him seconds,” Dauphinais wrote in a January text.  “I told her no because this child will eat till he pukes and then eat some more. I also told her that he’s having cake after so there is no need for seconds.”
“She said I was wrong and that was child abuse,”  Dauphinais continued.  “She said that she’s an Italian grandma and that she considers this child abuse in her family. Like wtf!”

The 5-year-old boy was found dead and his mother jailed. ‘What the hell was happening in that home?’

According to two physicians who spoke with the Globe, both of whom specialize in cases of child abuse or neglect, the details outlined in the autopsy report paint a particularly grim picture.  Though neither is involved with the case or privy to case files, both described the autopsy findings to be extreme, even within the realm of neglect cases.

“This is not like an everyday thing,” said Dr. Suzanne Haney, a Nebraska-based child abuse pediatrician who serves as the chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Child Abuse and Neglect. “This extreme of a case, fortunately, is very rare.”

Both doctors described the bedsores, in particular, as highly irregular in a developmentally normal child.  The painful, circular lesions are almost never seen in young, physically mobile patients, leading them to believe that Elijah could have been restrained in some way prior to his death.

“Skin breakdown or bedsores is not something you’d ever see in a healthy 5-year-old,” said Newton.  “That, to me, speaks to being tied down . . . or [being] so weak or malnourished that he was unable to move at the end of his life.”

Added Haney, “If you combine malnourishment and pressure ulcers, I’m thinking he was either restrained or his malnourishment was to the point where . . . he was unconscious or semiconscious for a period of time.”

Either condition would’ve been a red flag to doctors, said Newton — but it’s unclear whether Dauphinais ever took Elijah to see a physician in New Hampshire.

Born in Arizona in 2016, the boy spent much of his early life in the custody of his father following his parents’ contentious 2017 divorce.  In divorce paperwork, Timothy Lewis accused Dauphinais of being “violent and impulsive” and having a “history of domestic violence and substance abuse.”  A decree approved by the court blocked Dauphinais from spending time with her son.

Last May, however, for unclear reasons, Elijah arrived in New Hampshire to live with Dauphinais and her boyfriend, Stapf.

Though initially excited by her son’s arrival, Dauphinais, two friends said, soon became exasperated by what she described as the boy’s myriad behavioral issues.  In texts to a friend last summer, Dauphinais likened her son to a serial killer, saying she felt no connection to the child and that she wanted him “gone.”

‘I want him gone.’ Elijah Lewis’s mother messaged a friend just months before his mysterious death

One friend, Michelle O’Brien, who has known Dauphinais since both were teenagers, told the Globe she’d provided the name of a pediatrician to Dauphinais, but did not know whether she ever followed up on it.

The office of New Hampshire Attorney General John M. Formella, which is handling the case, has declined to release records of previous police visits to the home that Dauphinais and Stapf shared, though neighbors said police were a common presence at the residence, which backs up to a quiet lake.

New Hampshire Representative Kimberly Rice, who chairs the House committee on children and family law, acknowledged that the state’s child welfare agency has suffered from staffing issues that have left it hamstrung.

“I don’t think they’re doing a bad job at DCYF,” said Rice.  “We have positions that need to be filled that are funded, but the people aren’t there, and if the people aren’t there, I don’t know how you continue to hold an agency accountable when you can’t get the positions filled.”

Investigators pledge to find justice for 5-year-old boy after body found buried in Abington woods

As the criminal case moves forward, meanwhile, Moira O’Neill, director of the New Hampshire Office of the Child Advocate, said her office would be opening an investigation into the circumstances surrounding Elijah’s death.

Appointed by New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu in 2018, O’Neill provides oversight of the state’s child protection services, as well as “holding systems accountable,” according to the state website.

But with a small office currently engaged in other cases, she cautioned that the process could take up to a year to complete.

“If what’s reported in the newspapers is correct,” O’Neill said, “it does sound as though this was a preventable death.”

The Lack Of Supervision In High School Sports – Supervision – 4

.jpg photo of Lot and Angels at the gates of Sodom
Lot and Angels at Gates of SODOM

This is not even a drop in the bucket of what I found:

Alleged ‘sadistic hazing rituals’ lead to 13 arrests of male student athletes in small Texas town
April 14, 2017 (La Vernia)
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/04/14/alleged-sadistic-hazing-rituals-lead-to-13-arrests-of-male-student-athletes-in-small-texas-town/

Police report details alleged sexual assault in broomstick hazing of Maryland high school football players
November 7, 2018
https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/bs-md-damascus-hazing-20181107-story.html

Culture of hazing led to boy being sexually assaulted by player at Reed-Custer football practice
November 28, 2018 (Illinois)
https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/ct-met-will-county-high-school-hazing-lawsuit-20181128-story.html

High School Football Players Sexually Assaulted Younger Teens For A Hazing Ritual
October 7, 2019 (Illinois)
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/paigeskinner/football-players-hazed-sexual-assault

Huntsville parents rip School Board over hazing case
2020 – 2021 (Arkansas)
https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2021/jun/18/huntsville-parents-rip-school-board-over-hazing/

Pojoaque HS students under investigation for alleged sexual hazing
September 17, 2021 (NM)
https://www.kob.com/new-mexico-news/pojoaque-hs-students-under-investigation-for-alleged-sexual-hazing/6241872/

Sources: Police investigating allegations of hazing, sexual assault on Woburn High School football team
October 15, 2021 (MA)
https://www.wcvb.com/article/woburn-high-school-football-alleged-hazing-october-15-2021/37977735#

Wall Township High School football player already involved in an ongoing investigation into a locker room hazing incident has been accused of sexual assault
November 11, 2021 (NJ)
https://shoresportsnetwork.com/wall-township-high-school-football-player-accused-of-sexual-assault-incident-unrelated-to-hazing-investigation/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

MA ATTORNEY GENERAL LOOKS IN ON DANVERS – SUPERVISION – 3

.jpg photo of MA Attorney General Logo AG wants more information on Danvers hockey hazing, sexual assault allegations

By Jill Harmacinski jharmacinski@eagletribune.com

DANVERS, MA  –  Stopping short of calling it an investigation, a spokesperson for Attorney General Maura Healey said her office has requested “more information” from both the Danvers schools and Police Department in light of allegations of sexual and physical abuse, racism and other unacceptable behavior among varsity hockey players.

Healey, through her spokesperson, described the accusations as disturbing and extremely troubling.

“Racism, homophobia, and bigotry of any kind have no place in our locker rooms, rinks and playing fields.  If you think sports are about bullying and hazing, you’re losing, and our kids are paying the price,” Healey wrote in social media posts this week.  The posts were not specific to the Danvers situation.

Boston attorney Mitchell Garabedian, who has represented thousands of Catholic Church sexual abuse victims, on Thursday called on Healey or federal authorities to investigate what he described as an “institutional coverup.”

A former varsity hockey player who declined to be named told authorities and news reporters that teammates engaged in racist and sexual misconduct during the 2019-2020 season.

In previous interviews with The Salem News, his account touched on hazing, racism, homophobic and sexual misconduct by the then- varsity hockey team.  He said the toxic culture allowed younger players to be bullied and hushed.

Police and the district attorney’s office said the unnamed hockey player declined to file a criminal complaint and thus they cannot pursue charges.

Danvers school and police officials conducted investigations into the accusations earlier this year.  They declined to release unredacted copies of the reports, contending privacy laws prevented full disclosure.

Some residents have called for the resignation of the School Committee and Superintendent Lisa Dana over the matter.  The hockey coach, Danvers Police Sgt. Stephen Baldassare, resigned from the team in July.

Healey previously issued guidance to Massachusetts schools regarding “legal obligations to prevent and address hate and bias incidents.”  Details were sent in November 2020 to school administrations throughout the state, according to the AG’s office.

When handling such incidents, Healey’s guidelines call for “transparency.”

“Hate incidents can have a significant and disruptive impact on the school community and are frequently the subject of broad community interest.  Schools should strongly consider issuing a prompt and clear communication to the school community when a hate incident occurs, particularly when dealing with incidents that are serious, public, or likely to be the subject of rumors and gossip,” the guidelines suggest.  “The communication should vigorously condemn hateful or biased conduct, explain the steps that the school is taking to address the incident, and reaffirm the shared values of the school community, such as respect for differences and a commitment to inclusivity, equity, and safety for all students.”

The former player spoke confidentially to the Salem News because he said he wanted to alert the community.  He did not want his name used, fearing retribution from teammates and town hockey fans.  He also spoke to school and police investigators.


He said he sensed his accounts of bad behavior were not taken seriously.  He did not file a criminal complaint in order to protect himself.

He said he was told to strip naked for “Gay Tuesdays,” when older players would turn off the locker room lights and inappropriately touch younger players.  Players who resisted were made to do so with force, he said.

He also said he was beaten with a sex toy for refusing to shout a racial slur on “Hard-R Fridays,” named for the final ‘r in the n-word.  Players would line up in front of their hockey bags and scream racial slurs, one by one, he said.

“There was a team dildo,” he said, named the Pink Dragon, for use on those who refused to join in the ritual.

He said he believes Hard-R Fridays came about from a toxic culture where racist players wanted teammates to be like them.

Danvers High School Hockey – Supervision – 2

.jpg photo of hockey arena
Raymond J. Bourque Arena

Danvers High School hockey needs a dose of sunshine

Boston Globe Opinion
By The Editorial Board – Updated November 8, 2021, 6:12 p.m

Its ‘Lord of the Flies’ locker room shows a failure of adult supervision.

If sunshine is indeed the best disinfectant, then it’s high time Danvers school officials aired out the high school hockey team locker room and let the rest of the community in on how badly the adults who should have been in charge failed the young people in their care.

Over the course of 16 months — and three investigations — school officials of that North Shore community continue to play hide-and-seek with the facts, forcing parents and potential student athletes to guess at whether an athletic program tainted by racism, sexism, homophobia, and antisemitism has changed.

The community has been kept largely in the dark even about the investigative reports, heavily redacted copies of which were obtained by the Globe following a six-month-long public records battle.

And without full disclosure of what went wrong during that 2019-20 season, there can be no “teachable moments,” and no confidence that those who have spent the past year trying to keep a deplorable situation under wraps have learned anything in the process.

The first investigation was launched by high school officials after spectators complained that three senior members of the hockey team, riding in a Jeep at the head of the school’s pandemic-induced rolling graduation parade, shouted racial slurs at Black sanitation workers they encountered en route.

What that probe turned up was a vivid account of a “Lord of the Flies” locker room where “Gay Tuesday” — where players allegedly stripped naked and ran around in the dark touching each other — was a regular event.  So too was “Hard R Fridays” — where some players were allegedly commanded to shout the n-word. Failure to do so, according to the account, could get a player targeted with a sex toy, nicknamed “The Pink Dragon,” held to his face long enough to make an indentation.

The public body of evidence of the allegations includes the yearbook profiles of three seniors who listed “G Tuesday” and “R Friday” among their interests and activities. A senior hockey player also listed the “Pink Dragon” as part of the “class will,” bequeathing it to a younger player.

But unlike in “Lord of the Flies,” there were supposed to be responsible adults in charge in Danvers — especially in the locker room.

“Athlete-to-athlete problems, such as sexual abuse, bullying, harassment or hazing, often occur when a coach or other responsible adult is not in a position to observe — this is especially true in locker rooms,” reads USA Hockey’s locker room policy, which requires “proper supervision” at all times.  (This organization is the national governing body for US amateur ice hockey and certified the Danvers head coach.)

One player interviewed by investigators and by the Globe told of an assistant coach walking in during the lights-out naked ritual only to be told it was “Gay Tuesday.”  He reportedly said, “I don’t want to know,” turned off the lights again and walked out.  The assistant coach denied the incident to investigators.

The head coach at the time, Stephen Baldassare, a former Danvers High athlete and longtime member of the local police department, also denied any knowledge of the locker room activities, although in a letter to “DHS Hockey Families,” he wrote, “I have learned from this experience and we will focus on creating a positive, supportive, respectful, and inclusive team environment for seasons to come.”

In July, however, the school system posted the head coaching job, and Superintendent Lisa Dana announced Baldassare had resigned.  Certainly anyone who was part of the coaching staff at the time should follow.  Willful blindness is never a desirable quality in a coach.

Dana’s announcement of Baldassare’s departure and a statement issued to the Globe about continuing “to move forward as an equity seeking district” is about as transparent as she has gotten to date.

Meanwhile, around the country and around this state, parents are demanding a greater role in the education of their children, demanding to be better informed, particularly when it comes to student safety.  They will not be mollified by platitudes — nor should they be.  And they are certainly entitled to a full accounting not just of how things went wrong but also how a toxic environment will be fixed.

It will rest with newer members of the School Committee, like Robin Doherty, to make sure that comes to pass.

“Transparency is the key to trust,” Doherty told the Globe.  “In order to learn from these events and ensure they never happen again, we must be open with our community.”

That’s part of her mandate now.  It would be even better if she got the support of her colleagues in the effort.