Tag Archives: Values

Who Gets Illegal Sales Money?

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Abortion Is Murder

‘The View’ Co-Host Calls Out
Planned Parenthood President’s
Absurd 3% Defense

The View Shoots Down PPh 3% Lie

Planned Parenthood has become synonymous with “abortion” — and for very good reason.

Promoting and performing abortions is a huge part of what the organization does on a daily basis, and it’s hardly a secret.

Its new president, however, apparently wants to sweep that reputation under the rug.

During a recent appearance on ABC’s “The View,” Dr. Leana Wen tried to repeat a long-debunked statistic to make abortion look like a minor part of Planned Parenthood’s services … but one of the show’s co-hosts quickly shot her down.

The largest abortion provider in America really, really wants people to think that it’s just a positive women’s health group.  Despite the fact that liberals constantly paint abortion as a great decision — even encouraging women to proudly “shout” their abortions — Planned Parenthood has also worked to downplay just how many of those life-ending procedures it conducts.

On Thursday, Wen used “The View” to declare that the organization she runs is “transparent” and abortions are only 3 percent of what the group does.  She also insisted that Planned Parenthood isn’t political, a bizarre claim at best.

“View” co-host Sunny Hostin wasn’t having it.  She slammed Wen on the claim of transparency, and pointed out that the group’s oft-repeated “3 percent” claim is pretty dishonest.

“Planned Parenthood provides more abortions, the most abortions than any other health care provider in the United States,” Hostin said, noting that the organization provided 328,348 abortions during the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

She pointed to The Washington Post, which gave a “Three Pinocchios” dishonesty rating to the claim that only a single-digit percentage of Planned Parenthood’s activities were abortions.

That liberal newspaper found that abortion accounts for at least 12 percent of Planned Parenthood’s services, and pointed out that it could be much higher depending on how the data are presented.

Slate, another left-leaning news outlet, distanced itself from the abortion provider’s claims of transparency.  It called the 3 percent claim the “most meaningless abortion statistic ever.”

Why are Planned Parenthood and its new president trying so hard to cover up just how involved it is in abortions?  It’s probably because the organization is receiving over $500 million dollars in government subsidies and knows that this funding could disappear if people start asking too many questions.

“I hear all the time, I don’t want my taxpayer money going to fund an organization that provides abortions, whether or not the money is direct or indirect,” another of the more conservative “View” co-hosts, Abby Huntsman, said.  “Do you understand why people have a hard time with it?”

Wen didn’t really answer, but deflected with another head-scratching claim.

“Health care shouldn’t be political,” she shot back.

Odd.  Why, then, do so many liberals want government to control almost every aspect of health care?

It’s an extremely strange stance to rake in hundreds of millions in taxpayer subsidies and demand state-run medical and insurance programs but then declare that “health care shouldn’t be political” with a straight face.

Planned Parenthood’s new president seems to have mastered the art of deflection and deception.  No wonder the increasingly scrutinized abortion promoter chose her.

No One Addressed The Video Our Security Found

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Abortion Is Murder

Bombshell New Evidence Suggests
Planned Parenthood Lied to Congress

NOT IN MY WORLD!!!! is where WE THE PEOPLE first heard that Planned Parenthood was making $1,000,000 to $10,000,000 daily off illegal sales of illegal fetal tissue for highly illegal research, and the illegal sales of viable murdered Baby organs for highly illegal transplants.

When the pro-life group Center for Medical Progress, led by a man named David Daleiden, released a series of shockingly disturbing undercover videos featuring doctors and employees of Planned Parenthood abortion clinics in 2015, those videos appeared to expose the abortion providers as being engaged in the unlawful harvesting and sale — for profit — of various internal organs and body parts of aborted babies.

Unsurprisingly, the pro-abortion left pushed back hard, launching an intense smear campaign against Daleiden and CMP to discredit them while the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, as well as a number of subsidiaries beneath them, filed a lawsuit against Daleiden and CMP to silence their voices and suppress their videos.

That effort to squash Daleiden and hide from the public what CMP had exposed may have backfired on Planned Parenthood, though, as Daleiden and CMP have refused to back down and instead are fighting the lawsuit in court, as evidenced by the recent filing of a motion to compel the release of certain records.

Incredibly, LifeNews has reported that the court motion may make public documents which will show that Planned Parenthood may have fabricated certain records to hide what they were doing, and not only that, but also lied about as much in sworn testimony before a Congressional panel.

In the motion to compel filed with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, the defendants — CMP, Daleiden and others — argued a number of legal precedents against the plaintiffs — Planned Parenthood Federation of America, a number of PP subsidiaries and third-party Advanced Bioscience Resources, among others — which they viewed as supportive of their demand that Planned Parenthood and ABR turn over certain documents and records as part of the discovery process.

Specifically, the defendants called for any documents and records that would show five specific things: a scheme to profit from the sale of fetal tissue, modifications to abortion procedures to facilitate such a profit, violations of the federal ban on partial-birth abortions as part of that scheme, the procurement of tissue from born-alive infants as part of the profit-making scheme and the procurement and sale of fetal tissues without the donor’s consent … all of which are illegal.

CMP has been seeking such documents for some time, but the plaintiffs have resisted such requests and made a number of different arguments to the court as to why they shouldn’t have to do so, hence the filing of the motion to compel.

After citing a number of legal precedents that undermined each argument put forward by Planned Parenthood to avoid turning over the requested documents and records, the motion from the defendants got to the heart of the matter in that they alleged the production of the records they seek would show discrepancies with records that Planned Parenthood had previously turned over to Congress.

That allegation was based on the fact that ABR had already produced certain documents and records — such as invoices — in response to an earlier subpoena from CMP, prior to ABR joining with PPFA in refusing to produce any further documents after what CMP alleged was “troubling” “attorney meddling” had occurred between the various plaintiffs in the case.

The motion alleged that there were substantial differences in invoices provided by ABR and two PP subsidiaries, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte and Planned Parenthood Pacific Southwest.  Specifically, “The PPMM invoices produced match, but ABR and PPPSW produced different versions of the same invoice.” (Emphasis included in court filing.)

“Further, the revenue totals and procurement totals, when added up based on the invoices produced by ABR and Plaintiff PPPSW, do not match the totals that PPPSW reported to the Select Investigative Panel for fiscal year 2015,” the motion continued, noting that one of the totals produced was for $18,960.

“However the ABR fetal tissue invoices for July 2014 to December 2014 alone — half of fiscal year 2015 — show revenues of $21,120 from ABR for 352 fetal tissue donations,” the defendants revealed.

“It is unclear to Defendants why the invoices are not identical, or why the numbers do not add up, but it is perfectly possible that the invoices were subject to tampering and someone falsely reported information to Congress,” the motion argued.  “Thus, it is critical that Defendants obtain access to third-party documents to verify that Plaintiffs are not producing fabricated evidence.”

As that motion to compel the release of the requested documents and records was just filed today — and is actually dated to take effect on November 29 — it could be some time before the judge rules one way or the other on this matter.

Daleiden told LifeNews, “This would not be the first time Planned Parenthood has apparently doctored critical evidence about their own wrongdoing.”

“Planned Parenthood has everything to lose if the full scope of their illicit trade in aborted baby body parts is revealed, and when the Congressional investigations made criminal referrals of Planned Parenthood and their business partners for selling baby parts, the House Select Panel had to refer Planned Parenthood partner StemExpress for evidence destruction.”

He added, “As the U.S. Department of Justice continues to follow up on the criminal referrals for Planned Parenthood and ABR, it is imperative for prosecutors to seize the original financial records from Planned Parenthood and their accomplices immediately, so these depraved enterprises cannot continue to cover up their criminal sale of baby body parts.”

80 Percent Of The Time

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Jacob John Weld, 29, of Petoskey

Petoskey man facing sexual assault,
Child Abuse charges

PETOSKEY, MI  –  A Petoskey area man is facing multiple felony charges in connection with allegations that he sexually and physically abused two young children, respectively.

Jacob John Weld, 29, of Petoskey was arrested last week on two counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct.  The charge is a felony which carries a maximum penalty of up to life in prison and a mandatory minimum sentence of 25 years in prison.  He was arrested on the afternoon of Oct. 10 on the charge.

At the time of his arrest on the sexual assault charges he was out of jail on bond following an Oct. 1 arrest on a charge of third-degree child abuse.  That charge is a felony punishable by up to two years in prison.

According to a Michigan State Police affidavit of probable cause filed in the case, the sexual assault charges stem from allegations that Weld sexually assaulted a young child at a home in Emmet County on at least two occasions in August and September of this year.  Police said the child came forward with the allegation on Oct. 8.  Police further said in the affidavit that when they interviewed Weld, he admitted to the actions with the child leading to the sexual assault charges.

In the child abuse case, Weld is accused of causing injury to a different young child.

In that case, Emmet County Sheriff’s Office deputies said in an affidavit of probable cause that the case was initially referred to police from a Michigan Department of Health and Human Services representative who was investigating a child abuse complaint. In the affidavit, police said the alleged abuse happened on or around Sept. 23. Police said an adult noticed bruising on the back of the child’s leg on Sept. 29. Police said the child reported having been spanked with a belt by Weld.
Police said when they interviewed Weld he said he “probably used a belt to spank (the child).”

Weld was originally released from jail on Oct. 1 after posting a $50,000 surety bond. But he now remains lodged in the Emmet County Jail in connection with the sexual assault case, for which a new bond has been set at $2 million.

Weld is slated to face preliminary examinations in both cases on Oct. 24 in 90th District Court.

Don’t Do This, You Gave NIMW It’s Start

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Google announced that it will shut down the consumer version of Google+ following the discovery of a bug that it opted to keep secret.

Google+ to shut down following bug that
exposed 500K profiles

Google yesterday announced that it will shut down the consumer version of Google+ following the discovery of a bug that it opted to keep secret.

In a blog post, the search giant framed the decision as one that makes sense given that very few people actively use Google+—”90 percent of Google+ user sessions are less than five seconds,” writes Ben Smith, a Google Fellow and VP of Engineering—and it doesn’t warrant the work required to keep tabs on developers.

But as the Wall Street Journal reports, the move comes after Google discovered a bug that left private user information open to developers in March, but declined to alert users for fear of regulatory scrutiny.

“A memo reviewed by the Journal prepared by Google’s legal and policy staff and shared with senior executives warned that disclosing the incident would likely trigger ‘immediate regulatory interest’ and invite comparisons to Facebook’s leak of user information to data firm Cambridge Analytica,” the Journal says.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai reportedly knew about the plan to forego notification.

In the blog post, Smith says Google discovered the bug in March as part of Project Strobe—”a root-and-branch review of third-party developer access to Google account and Android device data and of our philosophy around apps’ data access.”

The bug, according to Google, meant that third-party apps had access to “profile fields that were shared with the user, but not marked as public,” like name, email address, occupation, gender, and age. Google+ posts, messages, Google account data, phone numbers, or G Suite content were not accessible.

“We found no evidence that any developer was aware of this bug, or abusing the API, and we found no evidence that any Profile data was misused,” Smith says.

The bug, which Google patched in March, affected about 500,000 Google+ users. Was yours one of those accounts?  Sorry, there’s no way to tell.

“We made Google+ with privacy in mind and therefore keep this API’s log data for only two weeks,” according to Smith.  “That means we cannot confirm which users were impacted by this bug.”

According to Smith, the vulnerability didn’t rise to the level of requiring a notification.  “Every year, we send millions of notifications to users about privacy and security bugs and issues.  Whenever user data may have been affected, we go beyond our legal requirements and apply several criteria focused on our users in determining whether to provide notice,” he says.

It remains to be seen if regulators agree.  Uber kept a 2016 data breach secret, and that just resulted in a $148 million fine.

The Google+ shutdown, meanwhile, will occur over the next 10 months, so get your fill before August 2019.  If you use the service for work, though, Google+ is not going anywhere.

“Our review showed that Google+ is better suited as an enterprise product where co-workers can engage in internal discussions on a secure corporate social network,” Smith says.  “Enterprise customers can set common access rules, and use central controls, for their entire organization.  We’ve decided to focus on our enterprise efforts and will be launching new features purpose-built for businesses.  We will share more information in the coming days.”

As part of the announcement, Google also promised to give users “more fine-grained control over what account data they choose to share with each app.”  If an app wants access to a Calendar and Drive documents, for example, you can opt to share one but not the other.

Google will also “limit the apps that may seek permission to access your consumer Gmail data,” while Google Play will limit which apps that can ask for a user’s phone (including call logs) and SMS data.

Need More Attorneys General Like TX And NM

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NM Attorney General Hector Balderas

New Mexico Attorney General wants to handle fatal Child Abuse cases

Attorney General Hector Balderas wants New Mexico lawmakers to expand his authority by allowing him to take over child abuse cases resulting in death without having to wait for a district attorney to decline to prosecute, dismiss the case or ask for his help.

Why?  Balderas said in a phone interview Friday that his office is well equipped to handle such cases and he wants to be able to step in and help children whenever its resources are needed, “like the Navy SEALs.”

“When prosecutors have referred complex, tragic cases to us, we’ve had above-average success rates,” Balderas said.

Balderas said his office is uniquely equipped to handle complicated child abuse cases because his staff includes victim advocates, investigators, lawyers and appellate attorneys, meaning he could handle all aspects of a case without having to rely on other agencies to bring a case to trail.

“In every community, there are sometimes unhealthy tensions between law enforcement, child protective agencies and the DA’s Office,” Balderas said.  “But we are one unit.  We collaborate at every stage.  We are always working together.”

Under current laws, Balderas said, he has to wait for the prosecutor in the judicial district where a case arises to either ask for his help, dismiss a case or decline to prosecute before the Attorney General’s Office can jump in.

“To me, that’s just not sound policy when we are in a child abuse crisis,” Balderas said.  “Now is the time to make the attorney general an equal partner.  I shouldn’t have to ask for permission.  It shouldn’t be a failure in the system that triggers our ability to intervene.”

Balderas said district attorneys usually work well with his office but sometimes don’t agree on the best way to attack a case.

He pointed to a recent high-profile child abuse death in the Taos area in which authorities say a 3-year-old boy abducted by his father from the child’s mother’s home in Georgia was found dead after being denied medications and instead subjected to Islamic prayer rituals for healing.  Balderas said that case is an example of one that could have benefited from his office’s expertise.

The attorney general said he offered 8th Judicial District Attorney Donald Gallegos his help at the outset of the Taos County case, but Gallegos didn’t consult with him until after a judge denied a motion to hold the defendants without bail while they await trial.

“I offered meaningful support and strategy so they could win and the community would get a timely and aggressive prosecution,” Balderas said.  “I don’t believe it’s collaboration when you are only calling after a loss or setback.”

Gallegos did not return a call seeking comment for this story.

In other cases, Balderas said, the state Children, Youth and Families Department has made investigative missteps that affected the outcome.

CYFD Secretary Monique Jacobson said Friday she didn’t know enough about Balderas’ proposal to comment at length she welcomes the chance to partner with Balderas or any other law enforcement agency on improving front-end investigations to better protect the state’s children.  Jacobson added that her agency might not be affected if the law were changed because CYFD doesn’t participate in criminal investigations.

A spokesman for Second Judicial District Attorney Raúl Torrez in Albuquerque referred questions to New Mexico District Attorney’s Association President Dianna Luce.

Luce, a prosecutor in southeastern New Mexico, said in an email that Balderas had not contacted her organization about proposed legislation and that she cannot comment in her capacity as association president until she knows more.

“As the elected district attorney in the Fifth Judicial District,” she wrote, “I’m opposed to giving blanket authority to another entity outside of my district.  Our prosecutors have experience in prosecuting these types of cases and have successfully prosecuted child abuse resulting in death cases.”

In Santa Fe, First Judicial District Attorney Marco Serna said in an email Friday he also hadn’t seen the proposed law change and wanted a chance to discuss it with Balderas and the District Attorney’s Association to see what exactly the attorney general proposes.

“I can’t speak for all district attorneys in our state,” Serna wrote, “but I would anticipate opposition to the Attorney General’s position, considering each DA is elected to their respective districts.”

Serna added that he has a “great working relationship” with Balderas’ office and will continue to request assistance or pull resources from the Attorney General’s Office when needed.

Balderas said he is working to draft legislation and find a legislative sponsor.