Category Archives: StopChildAbuse

The Secret Password

.jpg photo of Child Predator graphic
Protect Your Children From Predators

Protect Your Children From Predators:
The Secret Password –
please pass it forward!

By: Kait King

I am very proud to introduce Ms Kait King, a true Writer Extraordinaire.

I don’t mind telling everyone that I have been Blessed every way possible, since starting that little one page gift to Google+ and all it’s users 5 years and 7 months ago, and Ms Kate King is one of those Blessings, a very large Blessing to be exact.

I met Ms King shortly after I opened our website.  I can tell you what I remember from back then: Ms King was a very good writer, and well educated.  But I was glad that I wasn’t standing in front of her, because I was humbled to tears.  This very special Lady was as good a Parent and Mother, as any that has ever walked this earth… and I stand by my words today.  There was only one thing that struck me as odd, she was working on a project with the name of “The 3 Pigs”.

OK, just one more thing, a warning, if anyone does not follow this link to The Secret Password©, you are going to miss something you will never forget….

You can continue to read the whole original story on Ms Kait King’s site, The Writer’s Blogk, by selecting the link immediately following this short excerpt. . Thank You all for reading, and when you are finished reading this unforgetable story, please do as Ms King wishes: Please Pass It On!
Robert StrongBow

A copy of a letter I sent to all of the primary schools to save children – simple and super effective!  Please pass it on

My son is 29 years old now and it has always amazed me at how many parents through those many years, and even now, who have no idea about the concept of the Secret Password.

I used to work as a National Intelligence Support Officer for the police.

via Protect Your Children From Predators: The Secret Password – please pass it forward!

Good Information And For My Doubters

.jpg photo graphic included with Mayo Clinic article
How Medical Professionals should address Child Physical Abuse.

Medical Professionals – Trauma: How to address Child Physical Abuse

Arne H. Graff, M.D., is the division chair of Child Abuse Pediatrics at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota.  His desire is to equip providers for potential child physical abuse (CPA) cases, helping them feel as comfortable as possible and removing the fear of reporting.  He offers perspective on CPA and what trauma professionals’ responsibilities are in this scenario.

How did you get into the child abuse field?

While I was working in North Dakota, a physician at Sanford Medical Center in Fargo talked me into working with him in a volunteer clinic.  While there, I ran into enough child abuse cases that I realized I needed to get out of it or get better.  So I did a fellowship in child abuse pediatrics.

Is child abuse common in Minnesota?

Around 84,000 reported cases of child maltreatment are reported each year in Minnesota, according to the Minnesota Department of Human Services and documented in the Child Maltreatment Report for 2017.   Minnesota has as high an incidence as some other states, like California, but doesn’t see as large of numbers due to population differences between Minnesota and the other states.

There are about 1,500 identified maltreatment deaths in Minnesota each year, but this is assumed underreported due to the difficulty in identifying many of the deaths as clearly caused by maltreatment.  In Rochester, Minnesota, and the immediate region, we have around 400 reported maltreatment cases each year.

(1,500÷365=4.1 Child Maltreatment deaths per day just in Minnesota, so how can so many distort the numbers by saying there has ever been 5 Child Maltreatment deaths each day in the last 100 years and possibly the last 150 years)

Which children are at highest risk of abuse?

A young child or infant is at highest risk.

Are any children overlooked for abuse?

Yes — teenagers.  I don’t want us as providers to just focus on little kids.  Teens have a similar CPA pattern as other children.  It’s important you consider whether abuse is occurring if you see a 15-year-old with an injury that doesn’t align with the history. Don’t assume because they’re teenagers, they aren’t experiencing abuse.

Who abuses children?

People who have access to children hurt children: parents, child care providers, grandparents and school personnel.  Anyone has the capacity to hurt children.

That said, it’s important to know that 82% of abusers are ages 18 to 44, and 80% of CPA is inflicted by parents, according to data from Child Welfare Information Gateway.

Is denial of mechanism of injury common in these cases?  If so, any advice?

Since we don’t know how often abuse is missed, we can’t guess at how often it’s denied.  Personal experience is that even with serious injuries, denial is common. Considering that one of the caregivers may not have knowledge of events that occurred with his or her partner, denial can be a normal answer.  Therefore, asking about domestic as well as pet violence is important, and also interviewing caregivers separately.  By emphasizing mandated reporting requirements and indicating concern about their child, we hopefully will maintain a working relationship with the family.

Any tips for assessing a child’s injury?

Every injury presented must be consistent with the child’s medical history and developmental ability.  If it doesn’t line up, ask why.  It doesn’t mean there’s abuse occurring, but it does mean something’s going on that doesn’t make sense.

Our job is to consider the injury’s cause — medical, accidental and then nonaccidental trauma — as well as medical history and mechanics.  It’s not our job to immediately assume, if we don’t like how it looks, that somebody’s abused the child. We have to start with ruling out other options, especially with a nonverbal child.

In 30% to 40% of cases we see, we have to say we can’t determine if an injury was abuse or accidental, and we need to consider potential options for the injury.

How should I determine which tests are needed?

First, it’s important to know that exams have limits.  You can’t determine abuse simply by physical exam.  However, being financially responsible means to not shotgun and do every test available.

If you need to consult on a potential CPA case, my colleague Donald (Chris) C. Derauf, M.D., and I are available 24/7 every day for curbside consults at no cost.  We do 300 to 400 of these a year.  You may call us through the MATC to discuss what you’re seeing in a case, and we can advise on screening.  We are your resource and encourage people to call and bounce things off us.

How do I figure out who did it?

You and I don’t care.  It’s not our job.  Our primary role is to prove it’s not abuse and look at accidental injuries or other conditions that may have caused the injury.  Also, our job is not to rule out people who may have abused the child, or determine reason or intent — leave that to the legal system.

How can I help stop CPA?

If you can recognize CPA early through a sentinel event — a case where injuries in children nonmobile or under age 4 can’t be explained by a simple accident, such as significant bruising to the head or neck — you can make a difference.  For these children, consider the injury to be caused by someone.  Bruising in a nonmobile child should be a red flag if not immediately explained by multiple people.

Sentinel injuries, without witnessed accident, carry high risk of further injury or death.  According to an article by Sheets and others in the April 2013 issue of Pediatrics, 27% of kids who’ve been seen by a provider and demonstrated to have had a sentinel event will return with serious injuries or dead.

What’s my responsibility?

 These are critical steps for providers in potential CPA cases:

  • Identify other possible injury causes.
  • Recognize these things are serious.  Once considering CPA as a potential cause, you are a mandated reporter.  It doesn’t have to be proved, just suspected.  You can’t simply write in your notes that you’re concerned and not report.  You must contact child protective services about a safety plan and tell them why there’s concern.
  • Conduct testing in a timely manner; it’s important for safety and complete diagnosis.
  • Remember multiple types of abuse can coexist.  Do a complete exam for neglect; don’t just focus on a bruise.
  • Don’t send the family home until all test results come through, or the child potentially may be going into an unsafe environment.  While you’re doing your work, child protective services (CPS) will develop a safety plan.  We can’t send the family out until this plan is finished and documented by the physician.
  • Make a complete description of the injury, including photos.

Any suggested approach with the family if CPA is suspected?

Since it’s not our role to decide who did it, I usually use this approach and advise providers to consider it.  I say to the caregiver present: “With this type of injury, without a known medical problem causing it or a witnessed accident, I am concerned someone may have hurt your child.  Because of this, I am a mandated reporter and have already spoken with child protective services.  They will want to talk with you about safety plans for your child.  I also want to recommend some tests that may better tell us why the injury occurred and if there are other injuries present we cannot see on the exam.”

It’s important to help families understand that just because the child looks happy and OK, it doesn’t rule out other injuries.

Any pitfalls you’d suggest avoiding with CPA?

We fail to recognize our blinders.  If you’re homeless or a minority, statistics say CPA cases are overreported, according to a 2011 publication in Journal of the National Medical Association.  However, studies indicate if you’re white middle class and present with an infant to the emergency room, people don’t even think about abuse. Also, if we know members of the family personally, there’s a tendency to say, “They are nice people.  They wouldn’t do this.”

If we think there might be abuse, we need to get CPS involved, period.  Letting our biases influence who we report puts kids at risk.  Remember, reporting may help services be put in place to assist the family.

Which patients who’ve survived potential CPA need transfer for further work-up?

The work-up needs to be completed at the time the concern is raised.  Depending on the child’s age, it may include:

  • A dilated eye exam by an eye expert, to be completed within 48 hours
  • A skeletal survey immediately and again in two to three weeks
  • A head CT if under age 1 or obvious head trauma
  • Abdominal labs

If testing can’t be completed, transfer to a larger center is indicated.  If testing can be done and a safety plan put in place, the child may be evaluated at the local site only and be watched overnight or be sent home, depending on tests and exam.

Resource: MayoClinic.org
This publication can be seen HERE complete with links.

Have You Seen These Men?

.jpg photo of Possible witness in Child Abuse case
PPB’s Child Abuse Team is seeking 2 individuals who might be witnesses to an on-going case.

PPB: Possible witnesses sought in
Child Abuse case

PORTLAND, OR  –  Investigators are asking for the public’s help in finding 2 possible witnesses in an on-going case.

.jpg photo of possible witness in Child Abuse case
PPB’s Child Abuse Team is seeking 2 individuals who might be witnesses to an on-going case.

The Portland Police Bureau’s Child Abuse Team believes these individuals could have critical information related to the case.

No other information about the case is being given.

If anyone recognizes these people, please contact Detective Todd Christensen at 503.823.0299 or at todd.christensen@portlandoregon.gov.

Jury Starts Deliberations In Davis Trial

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Kenneth R. Davis, 31, of Springfield Missouri

Dismissed jurors discuss Kenneth Robert Davis’ felony Child Abuse case

GREENE COUNTY, MO  –  A Greene County jury is deliberating the fate of an accused child abuser.

Robert Davis is charged with 7 felonies for brutally beating and torturing his then, 8 year-old daughter last year.

Attorneys for both sides stated their cases to the jury one last time Thursday morning.

The prosecution declares that Davis severely beat his daughter and that they proved their case beyond a reasonable doubt.

The defense argued that the state tried to make Davis look bad.   They insist that he did not abuse her.

We spoke to two alternate jurors after they were dismissed from the case.

“I felt like I’d ran a race and never got to cross the finish line.  I feel glad because I don’t have to be a part of it but I also wish I was able to finish out what we started.  I think he was, can I say, a big fat liar?  I thought he was a big fat liar,” said Julie Kennedy.

Heather Hutson was also dismissed from the case.

She said, “The defense just seemed kind of almost lost.  They weren’t really sure where to go.  This guy was guilty.  The defense didn’t seem to put up too much of a fight.  There was nothing to prove his innocence or to defend his innocence I should say.”

Davis is also charged in the beating death of two year-old Kinzlea Kilgore.

He’ll be in front of a Dallas County, Missouri judge for that case next week.

Michigan State Police ICAC Stops Child Predator

.jpg photo of child predator arrested in online child sex abuse sting operation
Alexander Joseph Piscitelli, 22, of Wyoming Michigan.

MSP: Undercover detective busts
Child Abuse plan

WYOMING, MI  –  A Wyoming man was arrested after he allegedly tried to set up a meeting to sexually assault children, state police say.

Alexander Joseph Piscitelli, 22, was arraigned on two counts of child sexually abusive activity and two counts of using a computer to commit a crime.

The Michigan State Police Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force says Piscitelli arranged online to pay someone to have sexual contact with a 5 and 8-year-old child.  But the person he was communicating with was an undercover detective.

MSP says it found more evidence against Piscitelli when officers searched his home after the arrest.

Online records show Piscitelli was booked into the Kent County jail Thursday and that he was being held on a $100,000 bond.

Tips about exploitation of a child online can be submitted to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children®.
CyberTipline
1-800-843-5678

Information on talking to your kids about online safety can be found on MSP’s website